Anne Conway The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy

The series includes texts by familiar names and also by less well-known authors. Wherever possible, texts are published in complete and unabridged from, and translations are specially commissioned for the series.

Anne Conway  The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy

A newly translated edition of Conway's radical and influential philosophical treatise.

The Philosophy of Anne Conway

Exploring all of the major aspects of Conway's thought, this book presents a valuable guide to her contribution to the history of philosophy.

The Philosophy of Anne Conway

The early modern philosopher Anne Conway offers a remarkable synthesis of ideas from differing philosophical traditions that deserve our attention today. Exploring all of the major aspects of Conway's thought, this book presents a valuable guide to her contribution to the history of philosophy. Through a close reading of her central text, Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy (1690), it considers her intellectual context and addresses some of the outstanding interpretive issues concerning her philosophy. Contrasting her position with that of contemporaries such as Henry More, Franciscus Mercurius van Helmont and George Keith, it examines her critique of the prominent philosophical schools of the time, including Cartesian dualism and Hobbesian materialism. From her accounts of dualism, time and God to the often overlooked elements of her work such as her theory of freedom and salvation, The Philosophy of Anne Conway illuminates the ideas and legacy of an important early-modern woman philosopher.

Anne Conway

This 2004 book was the first intellectual biography of one of the very first English women philosophers.

Anne Conway

This 2004 book was the first intellectual biography of one of the very first English women philosophers. At a time when very few women received more than basic education, Lady Anne Conway wrote an original treatise of philosophy, her Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy, which challenged the major philosophers of her day - Descartes, Hobbes and Spinoza. Sarah Hutton's study places Anne Conway in her historical and philosophical context, by reconstructing her social and intellectual milieu. She traces her intellectual development in relation to friends and associates such as Henry More, Sir John Finch, F. M. van Helmont, Robert Boyle and George Keith. And she documents Conway's debt to Cambridge Platonism and her interest in religion - an interest which extended beyond Christian orthodoxy to Quakerism, Judaism and Islam. Her book offers an insight into both the personal life of a very private woman, and the richness of seventeenth-century intellectual culture.

The Philosophy of Anne Conway

out of the first edition, such as important early philosophical letters between Conway and Henry More. ... The Conway Letters contains thirty-eight of Anne's letters, and we often have to use the replies of others to discern something ...

The Philosophy of Anne Conway

The early modern philosopher Anne Conway offers a remarkable synthesis of ideas from differing philosophical traditions that deserve our attention today. Exploring all of the major aspects of Conway's thought, this book presents a valuable guide to her contribution to the history of philosophy. Through a close reading of her central text, Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy (1690), it considers her intellectual context and addresses some of the outstanding interpretive issues concerning her philosophy. Contrasting her position with that of contemporaries such as Henry More, Franciscus Mercurius van Helmont and George Keith, it examines her critique of the prominent philosophical schools of the time, including Cartesian dualism and Hobbesian materialism. From her accounts of dualism, time and God to the often overlooked elements of her work such as her theory of freedom and salvation, The Philosophy of Anne Conway illuminates the ideas and legacy of an important early-modern woman philosopher.

The Conway Letters

A new Appendix contains some important letters not included in the first edition, among them the early discussion of Cartesianism. The Introduction by Sarah Hutton sets the book in the context of recent scholarship.

The Conway Letters

Lady Anne Conway was a remarkable woman who became a philosopher in her own right at a time when most women were denied even basic education. The Conway Letters is the record of her friendship with the Cambridge Platonist Henry More, which began when he acted as her unofficial tutor in philosophy and lasted until her death in 1679. The letters cover a wide range of topics--personal, philosophical, religious, and social. They give a detailed picture of the More-Conway circle, including such figures as Jeremy Taylor, Ralph Cudworth, Robert Boyle, and Francis Mercury van Helmont, as well as Lady Conway's Quaker associates George Keith and William Penn. The letters are thus a valuable source for mid-seventeenth-century history, and especially for the intellectual history of the period. This revised edition reprints all the letters from the original edition, published in 1930, together with Marjorie Nicolson's biographical account of Anne Conway and Henry More, with its emphasis on the personal side of their relationship. A new Appendix contains some important letters not included in the first edition, among them the early discussion of Cartesianism. The Introduction by Sarah Hutton sets the book in the context of recent scholarship.

Legacy of Anne Conway 1631 1679 The

Explores the work of Anne Conway, whose philosophy of the natural world incorporated a spiritual vision.

Legacy of Anne Conway  1631 1679   The

Explores the work of Anne Conway, whose philosophy of the natural world incorporated a spiritual vision.

Anne Conway s Intellectual Neighborhood

Anne Conway (1631-1679) fits into standard narratives of seventeenth-century natural philosophy only as a footnote, that rare example of a well-documented educated woman.

Anne Conway s Intellectual Neighborhood

Anne Conway (1631-1679) fits into standard narratives of seventeenth-century natural philosophy only as a footnote, that rare example of a well-documented educated woman. The focus placed on print publication by the history of science community means that most scholarly work views Conway through her metaphysical treatise, The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy, which was printed eleven years after her death. -- In early modern England, however, print did not carry the same cultural weight as today. Manuscript and letters were not viewed as less important methods of communication. Instead, each mode had its own norms and culture which intertwined in complicated ways. Privileging printed work flattens many aspects of early modern natural philosophy, but especially erases the involvement of women, who participated more freely in manuscript- and letter-based culture. -- This leads back to the archive, where Anne Conway's surviving correspondence--much of it published in 1930--provides a wider perspective on her life and work. Via letters, Conway received information on natural history and natural philosophy from as far away as Italy and Constantinople; discussed Descartes, Euclid, and the Kabbala; and orchestrated at least one debate between friends. Careful reading of her correspondence also suggests that Anne Conway's home, Ragley Hall, was the site of an ongoing dialogue about these and similar topics. She continually brought people to live and converse with her at Ragley: men and women, Quakers and Cambridge scholars, relatives and friends of friends. -- The ideas of community and the neighborhood have an important place in the historical literature on the early modern period, particularly in relation to women's lives and identities. Bringing this perspective to bear on Anne Conway, I use the term "intellectual neighborhood" to describe the network which Conway created and maintained to gather information about the world as well as people with whom to discuss that information, and to construct a place for herself as a natural philosopher.

Anne Conway The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy

Anne Conway was an extraordinary figure in a remarkable age.

Anne Conway  The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy

Anne Conway was an extraordinary figure in a remarkable age. Her Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy is the most interesting and original philosophical work written by a woman in the seventeenth century. Her radical and unorthodox ideas are important not only because they anticipated the more tolerant, ecumenical, and optimistic philosophy of the Enlightenment, but also because of their influence on Leibniz. This newly translated and fully annotated edition includes an introduction that places Conway in her historical and philosophical contexts, together with a chronology of her life and a bibliography.

Feminist History of Philosophy The Recovery and Evaluation of Women s Philosophical Thought

The volume contains contributions by an international group of leading historians of philosophy and political thought, whose scholarship represents some of the very best work being done in North and Central America, Canada, Europe and ...

Feminist History of Philosophy  The Recovery and Evaluation of Women s Philosophical Thought

Over the course of the past twenty-five years, feminist theory has had a forceful impact upon the history of Western philosophy. The present collection of essays has as its primary aim to evaluate past women’s published philosophical work, and to introduce readers to newly recovered female figures; the collection will also make contributions to the history of the philosophy of gender, and to the history of feminist social and political philosophy, insofar as the collection will discuss women’s views on these issues. The volume contains contributions by an international group of leading historians of philosophy and political thought, whose scholarship represents some of the very best work being done in North and Central America, Canada, Europe and Australia.

Philosophy of Mind in the Early Modern and Modern Ages

Essential reading for students and researchers in philosophy of mind, enlightenment philosophy, and the history of philosophy, Philosophy of Mind in the Early Modern and Modern Ages is also a valuable resource for those in related ...

Philosophy of Mind in the Early Modern and Modern Ages

The early modern period is arguably the most pivotal of all in the study of the mind, teeming with a variety of conceptions of mind. Some of these posed serious questions for assumptions about the nature of the mind, many of which still depended on notions of the soul and God. It is an era that witnessed the emergence of theories and arguments that continue to animate the study of philosophy of mind, such as dualism, vitalism, materialism, and idealism. Covering pivotal figures in philosophy such as Descartes, Hobbes, Kant, Leibniz, Cavendish, and Spinoza, Philosophy of Mind in the Early Modern and Modern Ages provides an outstanding survey of philosophy of mind of the period. Following an introduction by Rebecca Copenhaver, sixteen specially commissioned chapters by an international team of contributors discuss key topics, thinkers, and debates, including: Hobbes, Descartes’ philosophy of mind and its early critics, consciousness, the later Cartesians, Malebranche, Cavendish, Locke, Spinoza, Descartes and Leibniz, perception and sensation, desires, mental substance and mental activity, Hume, and Kant. Essential reading for students and researchers in philosophy of mind, enlightenment philosophy, and the history of philosophy, Philosophy of Mind in the Early Modern and Modern Ages is also a valuable resource for those in related disciplines such as religion, history of psychology, and history of science.

Women Philosophy and Science

This book sheds light on the originality and historical significance of women’s philosophical, moral, political and scientific ideas in Italy and early modern Europe.

Women  Philosophy and Science

This book sheds light on the originality and historical significance of women’s philosophical, moral, political and scientific ideas in Italy and early modern Europe. Divided into three sections, it starts by discussing the women philosophers’ engagement with the classical inheritance with regard to the works of Moderata Fonte, Tullia d'Aragona and Anne Conway. The next section examines the relationship between women philosophers and the new philosophy of nature, focusing on the connections between female thought and the new seventeenth- and eighteenth-century science, and discussing the work of Camilla Erculiani, Margherita Sarocchi, Margaret Cavendish, Mariangela Ardinghelli, Teresa Ciceri, Candida Lena Perpenti, and Alessandro Volta. The final section presents male philosophers’ perspectives on the role of women, discussing the place of women in the work of Giordano Bruno, Poulain de la Barre and the theories of Hobbes and Rawls. By exploring these women philosophers, writers and translators, the book offers a re-examination of the early modern thinking of and about women in Italy.

Women Philosophers of Seventeenth Century England

This volume collects the private letters and published epistles of English women philosophers of the early modern period (c. 1650-1700).

Women Philosophers of Seventeenth Century England

This volume collects the private letters and published epistles of English women philosophers of the early modern period (c. 1650-1700). It includes the correspondences of Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway, Damaris Cudworth Masham, and Elizabeth Berkeley Burnet. These women were the interlocutors of some of the best-known intellectuals of their era, including Constantijn Huygens, Walter Charleton, Henry More, Joseph Glanvill, John Locke, Jean Le Clerc, and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Their epistolary exchanges range over a wide variety of philosophical subjects, from religion, moral theology, and ethics to epistemology, metaphysics, and natural philosophy. For the first time in one collection, the philosophical correspondences of these women have been brought together to be appreciated as a whole. Women Philosophers of Seventeenth-Century England is an invaluable primary resource for students and scholars of these neglected women thinkers. It includes original introductory essays for each woman philosopher, demonstrating how her correspondences contributed to the formation of her own views as well as those of her better-known contemporaries. It also provides detailed scholarly annotations to the letters and epistles, explaining unfamiliar philosophical ideas and defining obscure terminology to help make the texts accessible and comprehensible to the modern reader. This collection and its companion volume, Women Philosophers of Eighteenth-Century England (forthcoming), provide valuable historical evidence that women made substantial contributions to the formation and development of early modern thought and reflect the intensely collaborative and gender-inclusive nature of philosophical discussion in the early modern period.

How to Know Everything about Anyone Through Handwriting

Describes the six major types of personality handwriting analysis can reveal, and explains how to predict compatibility, and perform self-analysis

How to Know Everything about Anyone Through Handwriting

Describes the six major types of personality handwriting analysis can reveal, and explains how to predict compatibility, and perform self-analysis

Studies on Locke Sources Contemporaries and Legacy

This is surely part of the justi cation for the practice, in almost every university, of including elements from the history of philosophy as a basic part of the undergraduate curriculum.

Studies on Locke  Sources  Contemporaries  and Legacy

John Cottingham In the anglophone philosophical world, there has, for some time, been a curious relationship between the history of philosophy and contemporary philosophical - quiry. Many philosophers working today virtually ignore the history of their s- ject, apparently regarding it as an antiquarian pursuit with little relevance to their “cutting-edge” research. Conversely, there are historians of philosophy who seldom if ever concern themselves with the intricate technical debates that ll the journals devoted to modern analytic philosophy. Both sides are surely the poorer for this strange bifurcation. For philosophy, like all parts of our intellectual culture, did not come into existence out of nowhere, but was shaped and nurtured by a long tradition; in uncovering the roots of that tradition we begin see current philoso- ical problems in a broader context and thereby enrich our understanding of their signi cance. This is surely part of the justi cation for the practice, in almost every university, of including elements from the history of philosophy as a basic part of the undergraduate curriculum. But understanding is enriched by looking forwards as well as backwards, which is why a good historian of philosophy will not just be c- cerned with uncovering ancient ideas, but will be constantly alert to how those ideas pre gure and anticipate later developments.