The Phoenicians

Introduces the customs, history, beliefs, and legends of the Phoenicians.

The Phoenicians

Introduces the customs, history, beliefs, and legends of the Phoenicians.

The Ten Commandments a Phoenician Legend

We come now to the story of Sanchoniaton, ancient author, who lived before the
Trojan War and wrote the Phoenician History as accurately as truth. Philon of
Byblos, not Philon the Hebrew, translated the whole history into Greek, we will
quote ...

The Ten Commandments a Phoenician Legend


Trees of the British Isles in History Legend

In parts of France the hawthorn is known as l'epine noble , because of
associations with the Crown of Thorns legend . The superstitious even assert that
the tree groans and sighs on Good Friday . Many peasants used to wear sprigs of
it in ...

Trees of the British Isles in History   Legend


Indaba My Children African Tribal History Legends Customs And Religious Beliefs

Sodimo Karesu Kadesi Makira-Kadesi The Boy Emperor His grandfather
Emperor of the Phoenicians' Empire in Africa Successor to Karesu, but murdered
by him Half-caste Empress, successor to her murdered husband Last Ruler in the
 ...

Indaba  My Children  African Tribal History  Legends  Customs And Religious Beliefs

First published in 1964, Indaba, My Children is an internationally acclaimed collection of African folk tales that chart the story of African tribal life since the time of the Phoenicians. It is these stories that have shaped Africa as we know it.

The Phoenician History of Philo of Byblos

Rooster is suggested by the rabbinic , be an attempt to interpret the verse and
understand the difficult word , . rendered by the Targum on the verse as xna swon
the equivalent among birds of the 7101 710 and Leviathan of Jewish legend .

The Phoenician History of Philo of Byblos


Thracian Legends

This rather complicated myth betrays the presence of Phoenician elements in the
legends and history of the Thracians . It is curious that Phineus was connected
with navigation . His kingdom was situated at the entrance to the Bosphorus and
 ...

Thracian Legends

Thraker.

A History of Greece to the Death of Alexander the Great

This coinage now comes to an end at Panormus , and is replaced by a coinage ,
of Greek type indeed , but with a Phoenician legend — the word Ziz . The change
seems to have been made just before the invasion , and it was significant of an ...

A History of Greece to the Death of Alexander the Great

"Notes and references": pages 835-862.

The Old Testament in the Light of the Historical Records and Legends of Assyria and Babylonia

According to Josephus (or, rather, Menander, whom he quotes), Phœnicia
submitted (Menander tells the story from the ... being aided on this occasion by
the Phœnicians, who furnished him with threescore ships, and 800 men to row
them.

The Old Testament in the Light of the Historical Records and Legends of Assyria and Babylonia

To find out how the world was made, or rather, to give forth a theory accounting for its origin and continued existence, is one of the subjects that has attracted the attention of thinking minds among all nations having any pretension to civilization. It was, therefore, to be expected that the ancient Babylonians and Assyrians, far advanced in civilization as they were at an exceedingly early date, should have formed opinions thereupon, and placed them on record as soon as those opinions were matured, and the art of writing had been perfected sufficiently to enable a serviceable account to be composed. This, naturally, did not take place all at once. We may take it for granted that the history of the Creation grew piece by piece, as different minds thought over and elaborated it. The first theories we should expect to find more or less improbable-wild stories of serpents and gods, emblematic of the conflicting powers of good and evil, which, with them, had their origin before the advent of mankind upon the earth. But all men would not have the same opinion of the way in which the universe came into existence, and this would give rise, as really happened in Babylonia, to conflicting accounts or theories, the later ones less improbable than, and therefore superior to, the earlier. The earlier Creation-legend, being a sort of heroic poem, would remain popular with the common people, who always love stories of heroes and mighty conflicts, such as those in which the Babylonians and Assyrians to the latest times delighted, and of which the Semitic Babylonian Creation-story consists. As the ages passed by, and the newer theories grew up, the older popular ones would be elaborated, and new ideas from the later theories of the Creation would be incorporated, whilst, at the same time, mystical meanings would be given to the events recorded in the earlier legends to make them fit in with the newer ones.

Contributions to Aegean Archaeology

We today do not have to accept the Trojan legend as historical merely because
the traditional date for the fall of Troy coincides very neatly with a vast movement
of Aegean and Anatolian peoples , Greeks among them , that pushed into the ...

Contributions to Aegean Archaeology


A History of Greece

From the Phoenicians the Euboeans at an early age learned the working of metal
; they are said to have been the first in ... In Greek legend Thebes is founded by
Cadmus , and through historical times the Acropolis was known as the Cadmea .

A History of Greece


Studies in Greek Scenery Legend and History

The period during which he ruled Athens was the happiest and greatest in her
history, as it was one of the greatest ages of the world. Other ages have had their
bright particular stars; the age of Pericles is the Milky Way of great men.

Studies in Greek Scenery  Legend and History

It may be reckoned a peculiar piece of good fortune that among the wreckage of classical literature the Description of Greece by Pausanias should have come down to us entire. In this work we possess a plain, unvarnished account by an eye-witness of the state of Greece in the second century of our era. Of no other part of the ancient world has a description at once so minute and so trustworthy survived, and if we had been free to single out one country in one age of which we should wish a record to be preserved, our choice might well have fallen on Greece in the age of the Antonines. No other people has exerted so deep and abiding an influence on the course of modern civilisation as the Greeks, and never could all the monuments of their chequered but glorious history have been studied so fully as in the second century of our era. The great age of the nation, indeed, had long been over, but in the sunshine of peace and imperial favour Greek art and literature had blossomed again. New temples had sprung up; new images had been carved; new theatres and baths and aqueducts ministered to the amusement and luxury of the people. Among the new writers whose works the world will not willingly let die, it is enough to mention the great names of Plutarch and Lucian. It was in this mellow autumn—perhaps rather the Indian summer—of the ancient world, when the last gleanings of the Greek genius were being gathered in, that Pausanias, a contemporary of Hadrian, of the Antonines, and of Lucian, wrote his description of Greece. He came in time, but just in time. He was able to describe the stately buildings with which in his own lifetime Hadrian had embellished Greece, and the hardly less splendid edifices which, even while he wrote, another munificent patron of art, Herodes Atticus, was rearing at some of the great centres of Greek life and religion. Yet under all this brave show the decline had set in. About a century earlier the emperor Nero, in the speech in which he announced at Corinth the liberation of Greece, lamented that it had not been given him to confer the boon in other and happier days when there would have been more people to profit by it. Some years after this imperial utterance Plutarch declared that the world in general and Greece especially was depopulated by the civil brawls and wars; the whole country, he said, could now hardly put three thousand infantry in the field, the number that formerly Megara alone had sent to face the Persians at Plataea; and in the daytime a solitary shepherd feeding his flock was the only human being to be met with on what had been the site of one of the most renowned oracles in Boeotia. Dio Chrysostom tells us that in his time the greater part of the city of Thebes lay deserted, and that only a single statue stood erect among the ruins of the ancient market-place. The same picturesque writer has sketched for us a provincial town of Euboea, where most of the space within the walls was in pasture or rig and furrow, where the gymnasium was a fruitful field in which the images of Hercules and the rest rose here and there above the waving corn, and where sheep grazed peacefully about the public offices in the grass-grown market-place. In one of his Dialogues of the Dead, Lucian represents the soul of a rich man bitterly reproaching himself for his rashness in having dared to cross Cithaeron with only a couple of men-servants, for he had been set upon and murdered by robbers on the highway at the point where the grey ruins of Eleutherae still look down on the pass; in the time of Lucian the district, laid waste, he tells us, by the old wars, seems to have been even more lonely and deserted than it is now. Of this state of things Pausanias himself is our best witness. To be continue in this ebook...

A History of Tristan Scholarship

( ii ) Mythological Origins While the theory that the Tristan legend derived from
British history was steadily gaining ground , other critics were beginning to strike
out in new directions in the study of origins . Jacob Bryant ' s book on the arkite ...

A History of Tristan Scholarship

This history presents a survey of the ideas and achievements of those scholars who, from the late 18th century up to the present, have dealt with the Tristan material and in particular with the medieval romance on this theme by Gottfried von Strassburg. The pertinent literature has been divided and arranged so that each chapter covers one of the main branches of Tristan scholarship and offers a chronological record of its development.

Legend Myth and History in the Old Testament

Damascus fell in 732 B. C, therefore 1 :5c was added by later editors. dThe
condemnation of the Philistine cities of Gaza, Ashdod, Ashkelon, and Ekron, the
Phoenician city of Tyre and the land of Edom is not written in the forceful style of
Amos.

Legend  Myth  and History in the Old Testament


The Ancient History of the Near East

Besides the case of Corinth , we have probable Phoenician traces , either in
legend or in placenames , at Thera and Kythera , where the purple - fishery had
attracted them ; at Samos and Adramyttion on the Asiatic coast , whose names
are ...

The Ancient History of the Near East


Faith and Thought

Not only does he bear a Phoenician name ( from qadmu , possibly meaning “ first
” ) , but several features of his legend have marked Phoenician affinities , and the
legend itself reflects an historical situation several generations before the ...

Faith and Thought


Transforming History

... question of transoceanic travel , from western Africa by the black race and
northern Africa by the Semitic Phoenicians . 24 From the world travels of the
Phoenicians , we can return to the Near East to pick up the story of our legendary
culture ...

Transforming History

Education is now at the fore of many Americans' concerns. But education is about more than teaching children how to function in life. It is a means of transmitting both a culture and a heritage. In this dynamic and far-reaching work, William Irwin Thompson, one of today's most innovative interdisciplinary thinkers, talks about how to transform a cultural legacy in the course of transmitting it. In the process of discussing this issue with the purpose of providing a home-schooling curriculum in the culture and history of humanity and the West, Thompson gives us a mind-rattling tour of our potential as human beings. He describes four "cultural ecologies" using a broad-based intellectual vista that takes in an expanse ranging from the Gilgamesh epic of 2000 B.C. to Disney, U2, and Ronald Reagan. His visionary approach takes education far beyond the bland, watered-down curricula so many students face today. He not only presents a far-reaching system of knowledge, but suggests how we may stimulate the best and healthiest patterns of development in children and teenagers.

The Early History of Greece

Farnell in searching for the origin of the stories was first inclined to see a
Phoenician influence , 166 connecting the legends with those of the Graeco -
Phoenician Melicertes , or at least , with the legends of that female divinity whose
power ...

The Early History of Greece


History of Rome

There was a time when the Mediterranean might be styled the Phoenician Sea .
The legend , summing up , as it always does , the ancient history of a people in
that of a THIS mythic hero , represented the successive stages of progress of ...

History of Rome


Tales and Legends of Morocco

Thus Tangier became the cradle of strange myths and legends in which fable
and history formed threads with which poets of imagination wove a brilliant
tapestry . So much for the legend . Now let us examine the facts of history . From
the ...

Tales and Legends of Morocco