The Poems of Edward Taylor

POETIC ACHIEVEMENT Taylor's poetic achievement comprises a lifetime of work , starting with some early poems composed while he was a schoolboy in London . At Harvard getting his education and later as a minister on the frontier of the ...

The Poems of Edward Taylor

Edward Taylor (1642-1729) was one of the most influential ministers in Puritan New England. He was also a prolific but unpublished poet. With the discovery of his poetry in 1936 and the publication of a nearly complete volume in 1960, his reputation as the premiere early American poet has grown immensely. Beginning with an overview of his life and times, this reference analyzes Taylor's poems in light of Puritan doctrine and his thoughts about poetry. The book traces the genesis of his works, their editorial and publication history, and the complex cultural and historical background of his writings.

The Poems of Edward Taylor

Other Writings of Edward Taylor In addition to the poems in this collection, the following volumes of Edward Taylor's writings have been published: The Poems of Edward Taylor. Edited by Donald E. Stanford.

The Poems of Edward Taylor

Now considered America's foremost colonial poet, Edward Taylor was virtually unknown until some of his poems were discovered in the Yale library and published in 1937. The intellectual brilliance and the emotional intensity of his poetical meditations have led critics to compare him to John Donne and George Herbert. These poems are now recognized as one of the great achievements in American devotional literature.

A Reading of Edward Taylor

The first part of the book examines the long doctrinal poem, Gods Determinations, as the poem in which Taylor emerges as an accomplished poet.

A Reading of Edward Taylor

"A Reading of Edward Taylor is a study of Taylor's poetry in the sense that Thomas M. Davis is interested in how the nature of the poems evolves during the nearly fifty years Taylor served as minister in Westfield, Massachusetts. The first part of the book examines the long doctrinal poem, Gods Determinations, as the poem in which Taylor emerges as an accomplished poet. The final section of the poem, the "Choral Epilogue," with its emphasis on praising God in song, leads directly to the initial poems of the Preparatory Meditations, the more than two hundred meditative poems that Taylor wrote over the next forty years." "The early poems in Series 1 exhibit only loosely organized sequences; some are directly prompted by the Lord's Supper, but many are related in only indirect ways to the Sacrament. These poems, in their range and celebration of the joys of grace, are some of Taylor's best. In Meditations 19-22, he writes four interlocked poems dealing with the relation of his poetry to his spiritual condition. Despite Taylor's disclaimers about the quality of his poetry, in these poems he also makes his most elevated claim about his ability to praise." "What reservations he has about his ability to praise adequately are relatively minor in subsequent Meditations. But after the death of his wife, Elizabeth, Taylor reexamines the nature of his poetry and the relationship of grace to his ability to write in praise of Christ. And he begins to equate shoddy poetry with his own sin. In the central Meditations in this process, Meditations 39 and 40, the intense examination of his sinful state ("My Sin! my Sin, My God, these Cursed Dregs. . .") leads him to beg Christ to destroy his (Taylor's) sins so that his "rough Feet shall [Christ's] smooth praises sing." By the end of Series 1, he has come to accept a more limited view of the possibility of writing praise commensurate with Christ's glory. He acknowledges that until he receives the Crown of Life "I cannot sing, my tongue is tide. / Accept this Lisp till I am glorifide."" "He then turns at the beginning of Series 2 to the poems on typology. These poems are often mechanical, particularly those where he is too strictly bound by the large number of typological parallels. He also recognizes these limitations and moves increasingly to other texts, particularly those from the Canticles. In the allegory of the Song, Taylor finds the openness and sensuous imagery that allow him to express as fully as is possible his love of Christ and his passionate desire to be with the Bridegroom in the heavenly Garden. The more than forty Meditations based on Canticles texts near the end of Series 2 reveal Taylor's sense of drawing closer and closer to being in the Garden itself, and of replacing his "lisp" with the true voice of the glorified."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

A Concordance to The Poems of Edward Taylor

THE WORDS OF EDWARD TAYLOR Karl Keller Chime my affections in To serve thy Sacred selfe with Sacred art . ( II.36 ) * Interest in the Puritan poet Edward Taylor ( 1642-1729 ) has now progressed to that point where it can at last focus ...

A Concordance to The Poems of Edward Taylor

Includes Preparatory meditations, God's determinations touching his elect, and the miscellaneous poems in D. Stanford's The poems of Edward Taylor.

A Concordance to the Major Poems of Edward Taylor

Introduction The Concordance to the Major Poems of Edward Taylor , a general - use reference tool for Edward Taylor scholars and students , is based on Daniel Patterson's recent edition , Edward Taylor's Gods Determinations and ...

A Concordance to the Major Poems of Edward Taylor

The Concordance to the Major Poems of Edward Taylor is a general use concordance of the work of British colonial and American puritan poet, Edward Taylor (d. 1729). Taylor's major poems, "Gods Determinations" and "Preparatory Meditations," represent nearly 50 years of poetic production of this devotional poet, whose emphasis on language and linguistic complexity make this concordance an essential tool of scholarship. This keyword-in-context (KWIC) concordance is based on Daniel Patterson's recent edition, Edward Taylor's Gods Determinations and Preparatory Meditations (Kent State UP, 2003) and offers users an extensive compilation and sorting of orthographic variants, treatment of homographs as discrete words, and an index of other words typically excluded from such works.

Edward Taylor s Gods Determinations and Preparatory Meditations

A Critical Edition Edward Taylor Daniel Patterson. When the young minister - poet Edward Taylor moved to Westfield , Massachusetts , in November of 1671 , he had written several poems . When he died there fifty - eight years later ...

Edward Taylor s Gods Determinations and Preparatory Meditations

When the young minister-poet Edward Taylor moved to Westfield, Massachusetts, in November of 1671, he had written several poems. When he died there fifty-eight years later, in addition to thousands of sermons and more than 2,000 manuscript pages of original prose, he had composed some 40,000 lines of poetry. For two of his poetic projects in particular, Taylor is considered - with Anne Bradstreet - one of British North America's most accomplished poets. Daniel Patterson's Edward Taylor's Gods Determinations and Preparatory Meditations: A Critical Edition reconsiders the texts of Taylor's two major works for the first time since Donald Stanford's 1960 edition. This volume also offers the first complete text of all the Meditations that Taylor transcribed into his Poetical Works manuscript. The restoration of Taylor's text, however, is the most enduring value of this edition, which is designed to become the new standard edition of these poems. The scores of substantive variants and the hundreds of variants in matters of punctuation and capitalization existing between the Patterson and Stanford texts are fully reported in the back of the volume, as are all editorial emendations. Ulti

A Concordance to the Minor Poetry of Edward Taylor 1642 1729 American Colonial Poet

For the Psalms , Job and other paraphrastic poems , the Holy Bible ( KJV ) was consulted as a source text when context ... Edward Taylor's occasional hyphenations appear alphabetically according to the first word of the hyphenated form ...

A Concordance to the Minor Poetry of Edward Taylor  1642  1729   American Colonial Poet

The purpose of this concordance is to provide a thorough tool for Taylor scholarship, and to this end it is designed to anticipate the needs of the greatest number of Taylor scholars without compromising the needs of those with special interest in stylistic features of Taylor's work.

The Poetical Works of Edward Taylor

“Inventory of the Estate of the Rev. erend Edward Taylor, Jan. 13, 1729/30.” Savage, James, A GENEALOGICAL DICTIONARY OF THE FIRST SETTLERs of NEW ENGLAND, Boston, 1860-1862. 4 vols. Sewall, Samuel, DIARY OF SAMUEL SEwALL, ...

The Poetical Works of Edward Taylor

From a 250 year-old manuscript come these selections from the work of America's first important poet, Edward Taylor of Massachusetts. He was regarded by Mark Van Doren as the writer of "the most interesting American verse before the 19th century." Originally published in 1966. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

American Puritan Imagination

Dialectal and Phonetic Features of Edward Taylor's Rhymes : a Brief Study Based upon a Computer Concordance of His Poems ' , American Literature , XLIII ( 1971 ) , 165-80 . Taken from Dissertation of the same title , Wisconsin , 1970 .

American Puritan Imagination

The major themes, leading exponents, style, and genres of early American literature are investigated

American and British Poetry

Edward Taylor's ' Occasional Meditations , ' ” Early American Literature 5 ( 3 ) , Winter 1970-71 , 22-23 . CECELIA L. HalBERT . " Tree of Life Imagery in the Poetry of Edward Taylor , ” American Literature 38 ( 1 ) , March 1966 ...

American and British Poetry


Making Nature Sacred

“The Great Bones Dug up at Claverack,” in Edward Taylor's Minor Poetry, in The Unpublished Writings of Edward Taylor, ed. Thomas M. and Virginia L. Davis ... 53–54, 59, 78, 181); I also discuss Taylor's related insect poems (192– 199).

Making Nature Sacred

This book argues that the religious import of American environmental literature has yet to be fully recognized or understood. Making Nature Sacred explores how the quest for 'natural revelation' has been pursued through successive phases of American literary and intellectual history.

Reference Works in British and American Literature

Edward Taylor , c . 1644-1729 Bibliographies 1323. Gefvert , Constance J. Edward Taylor : An Annotated Bibliography , 16681970. Kent , OH : Kent State University Press , 1971. 82p . ( The Serif Series : Bibliographies and Checklists ...

Reference Works in British and American Literature

Bracken identifies and describes a substantial portion of the currently available reference sources in British and American literature with more than 1,500 resources on individual writers. Descriptive annotations offer thorough and detailed assessments of the works.

A Study Guide for Edward Taylor s Huswifery

A minister and a poet, Edward Taylor is regarded as one of the most important voices of early American literature. Only a few stanzas of his poetry were published in his lifetime, but more of his poems and sermons as well were published ...

A Study Guide for Edward Taylor s  Huswifery

A Study Guide for Edward Taylor's "Huswifery," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Poetry for Students. This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Poetry for Students for all of your research needs.

The Oxford Handbook of Early American Literature

Taylor, Edward. 1960. The Poems of Edward Taylor, edited by Donald E. Stanford. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. ———. 1962a. Edward Taylor's Christographia, edited by Norman S. Grabo. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. ———.

The Oxford Handbook of Early American Literature

Organized primarily in terms of genre, this handbook includes original research on key concepts, as well as analysis of interesting texts from throughout colonial America. Separate chapters are devoted to literary genres of great importance at the time of their composition that have been neglected in recent decades.

Edward Taylor s Minor Poetry

Edward Taylor s Minor Poetry


Design in Puritan American Literature

between artistic impulse and scriptural authority in Taylor's poem, see Lynn M. Haims, "Puritan Iconography: The Art of Edward Taylor's Gods Determinations," Puritan Poets and Poetics, pp. 84-98. 40. The Poems of Edward Taylor, p. 399.

Design in Puritan American Literature

Puritan American writers faced a dilemma: they had an obligation to use language as a celebration of divine artistry, but they could not allow their writing to become an iconic graven image of authorial self-idolatry. In this study William Scheick explores one way in which William Bradford, Nathaniel Ward, Anne Bradstreet, Urian Oakes, Edward Taylor, and Jonathan Edwards mediated these conflicting imperatives. They did so, he argues, by creating moments in their works when they and their audience could hesitate and contemplate the central paradox of language: its capacity to intimate both concealed authorial pride and latent deific design. These ambiguous occasions served Puritan writers as places where the threat of divine wrath and the promise of divine mercy intersected in unresolved tension. By the nineteenth century the heritage of this Christlike mingling of temporal connotation and eternal denotation had mutated. A peculiar late eighteenth-century narrative by Nathan Fiske and a short story by Edward Bellamy both suggest that the binary nature of language exploited by their Puritan ancestors was still a vital authorial concern; but neither of these writers affirms the presence of an eternal denotative signification hidden within the conflicting historical contexts of their apparently allegorical language. For them, appreciation of the mystery of a divine revelation possibly concealed in words yielded to puzzlement over language itself, specifically over the inadequacy of language to signify more than its own instability of design. This book is a tightly focused study of an important aspect of Puritan American writers' use of language by one of the leading scholars in the field of early American literature.

Popular Measures

priate for the more private poems , and Keller includes sections of Gods Determinations in this category ; " Example of Edward Taylor , " 5—26 . 42. Bush , " Paradox , " 61 ; Stanford , " Edward Taylor , " 79 ; Taylor , " Critical ...

Popular Measures

In Popular Measures, Amy Morris examines the influence of church practices on the poetry of seventeenth-century New England. In a community where the Book of Common Prayer was banished from the church, and preference was given to the plain-style sermon (delivered orally and often without notes), what role was there for religious poetry? As a humanly crafted, fixed form, poetry fell short of the ideal of spontaneous, spirit-filled language promoted by Congregationalists. By analyzing the impact of this religious culture on the design of early New England verse, Morris shows how writers adapted English poetic conventions to fit their new colonial context. Throughout her investigation, Dr. Morris explains the relevant political and religious background, especially the controversial "Halfway Covenant," that shaped the popular measures of colonial America.

George Herbert Edward Taylor and the Poetry of Sacramental Praise

2 Taylor undoubtedly went to school to Herbert . Ever since Thomas H. Johnson published his 1939 edition of Edward Taylor's newly discovered poems , critics have found it useful to compare the two poets . The comparison has nearly ...

George Herbert  Edward Taylor  and the Poetry of Sacramental Praise


The Turn Around Religion in America

For the poet Edward Taylor, investigating his deep and far-reaching Hebraic commitments opens different avenues into his work and into the implications of Hebraism in American culture more generally. Discussions of Edward Taylor have ...

The Turn Around Religion in America

Playing on the frequently used metaphors of the 'turn toward' or 'turn back' in scholarship on religion, The Turn Around Religion in America offers a model of religion that moves in a reciprocal relationship between these two poles. In particular, this volume dedicates itself to a reading of religion and of religious meaning that cannot be reduced to history or ideology on the one hand or to truth or spirit on the other, but is rather the product of the constant play between the historical particulars that manifest beliefs and the beliefs that take shape through them. Taking as their point of departure the foundational scholarship of Sacvan Bercovitch, the contributors locate the universal in the ongoing and particularized attempts of American authors from the seventeenth century forward to get it - whatever that 'it' might be - right. Examining authors as diverse as Pietro di Donato, Herman Melville, Miguel Algarin, Edward Taylor, Mark Twain, Robert Keayne, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paule Marshall, Stephen Crane, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Joseph B. Soloveitchik, among many others-and a host of genres, from novels and poetry to sermons, philosophy, history, journalism, photography, theater, and cinema-the essays call for a discussion of religion's powers that does not seek to explain them as much as put them into conversation with each other. Central to this project is Bercovitch's emphasis on the rhetoric, ritual, typology, and symbology of religion and his recognition that with each aesthetic enactment of religion's power, we learn something new.