The Poems of Hesiod

Hesiod is the first Greek and, therefore, the first European we can know as a real person, for, unlike Homer, he tells us about himself in his poems.

The Poems of Hesiod

Hesiod is the first Greek and, therefore, the first European we can know as a real person, for, unlike Homer, he tells us about himself in his poems. Hesiod seems to have been a successful farmer and a rather gloomy though not humorless man. One suspects from his concern for the bachelor's lot and some rather unflattering remarks about women that he was never married. A close study of both poems reveals the same personality -that of a deeply religious man concerned with the problems of justice and fate.

The Poems of Hesiod

It makes up the third section of this book"--Provided by publisher. ”Barry Powell, known for his powerful translations of Homer, now brings to life the epics of Hesiod, the second giant of early Greek literature.

The Poems of Hesiod

"The Theogony is one of the most important mythical texts to survive from antiquity, and we devote the first section to it. It tells of the creation of the present world order under the rule of almighty Zeus. The Works and Days, in the second section, describes a bitter dispute between Hesiod and his brother over the disposition of their father's property, a theme that allows Hesiod to range widely over issues of right and wrong. The Shield of Herakles, whose centerpiece is a long description of a work of art, is not by Hesiod, at least most of it, but it was always attributed to him in antiquity. It is Hesiodic in style and has always formed part of the Hesiodic corpus. It makes up the third section of this book"--Provided by publisher.

Hesiod the Poems and Fragments Done Into English Prose

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process.

Hesiod  the Poems and Fragments  Done Into English Prose

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

Theogony

"Written in the late eighth century BC by Hesiod, one of the oldest known of Greek poets, Theogony and Works and Days represent the earliest account of the origin of the Greek gods, and an invaluable compendium of advice for leading a moral ...

Theogony

"Written in the late eighth century BC by Hesiod, one of the oldest known of Greek poets, Theogony and Works and Days represent the earliest account of the origin of the Greek gods, and an invaluable compendium of advice for leading a moral life, both offering unique insights into archaic Greek society ... This translation contains a general introduction, a translator's introduction, notes, and a glossary."--Publisher description.

Hesiod The Other Poet

This book offers a comprehensive account of the role of Hesiod in the ancient imagination, investigating the poet as a literary-critical concept, a moral and philosophical symbol, and generally a cultural icon endlessly employed and re ...

Hesiod  The Other Poet

This book offers a comprehensive account of the role of Hesiod in the ancient imagination, investigating the poet as a literary-critical concept, a moral and philosophical symbol, and generally a cultural icon endlessly employed and re-created by later Greeks.

Work and Days

Work and Days is a didactic poem of some 800 verses written by the ancient Greek poet Hesiod around 700 BC. At its center, the Works and Days is a farmer's almanac in which Hesiod instructs his brother Perses in the agricultural arts.

Work and Days

Work and Days is a didactic poem of some 800 verses written by the ancient Greek poet Hesiod around 700 BC. At its center, the Works and Days is a farmer's almanac in which Hesiod instructs his brother Perses in the agricultural arts. Scholars have seen this work against a background of agrarian crisis in mainland Greece, which inspired a wave of colonial expeditions in search of new land. In the poem Hesiod also offers his brother extensive moralizing advice on how he should live his life.

Hesiod s Works and Days

This volume situates the poem within these two modes of reading and argues that the text itself sustains both treatments, advocating not blind adherence to Hesiod's teachings but thinking for oneself and working for one's lesson.

Hesiod s Works and Days

Hesiod's 'Works and Days' was often performed in its entirety, but was also relentlessly excerpted, quoted, and reapplied. This volume situates the poem within these two modes of reading and argues that the text itself, through Hesiod's complex mechanism of rendering elements detachable whilst tethering them to their context for the purposes of the poem, sustains both treatments.

Hesiod

Hesiod belongs to the transitional period in Greek civilization between the oral tradition and the introduction of a written alphabet.

Hesiod

Hesiod belongs to the transitional period in Greek civilization between the oral tradition and the introduction of a written alphabet. His two major surviving works, the Theogony and the Works and Days, address the divine and the mundane, respectively. The Theogony traces the origins of the Greek gods and recounts the events surrounding the crowning of Zeus as their king. A manual of moral instruction in verse, the Works and Days was addressed to farmers and peasants. Introducing his celebrated translations of these two poems and of the Shield, a very ancient poem of disputed authorship, Apostolos Athanassakis positions Hesiod simultaneously as a philosopher-poet, a bard with deep roots in the culture of his native Boeotia, and the heir to a long tradition of Hellenic poetry. For this eagerly anticipated revised edition, Athanassakis has provided an expanded introduction on Hesiod and his work, subtly amended his faithful translations, significantly augmented the notes and index, and updated the bibliography. Already a classic, Hesiod: Theogony, Works and Days, Shield is now more valuable than ever for students of Greek mythology and literature.

Hesiod

"In Theogony Hesiod charts the history of the divine world, narrating the origin of the universe and the rise of the gods, from first beginnings to the triumph of Zeus, and reporting on the progeny of Zeus and of goddesses in union with ...

Hesiod


Farming and Poetry in Hesiod s Works and Days

This book fills a void in classical scholarship with its treatment of the interplay between farming and poetry in Hesiod's poem and in later Greek poetry.

Farming and Poetry in Hesiod s Works and Days

This book fills a void in classical scholarship with its treatment of the interplay between farming and poetry in Hesiod's poem and in later Greek poetry. Its accessibility to those unfamiliar with ancient Greek is heightened by the translations of Greek words and phrases, along with an introduction aimed at the non-specialist, yet the book deals masterfully with semantics and parallels within Greek poetics in order to reveal the interconnectedness of Hesiod's Almanac and moral themes. Farming and Poetry in Hesiod's Works and Days will be of interest to classical scholars and the general reader interested in Greek poetics.

Hesiod

The reading of Hesiod offered here does not stress his value as a historical, mythological, or theological source, although these issues are fraught with difficulties that require at least a provisional resolution in order for the poems to ...

Hesiod

The reading of Hesiod offered here does not stress his value as a historical, mythological, or theological source, although these issues are fraught with difficulties that require at least a provisional resolution in order for the poems to be read.

Hesiod s Ascra

In this book, Anthony T. Edwards extracts from the poem a picture of the social structure of Ascra, the hamlet in northern Greece where Hesiod lived, most likely during the seventh century b.c.e.

Hesiod s Ascra

In Works and Days, one of the two long poems that have come down to us from Hesiod, the poet writes of farming, morality, and what seems to be a very nasty quarrel with his brother Perses over their inheritance. In this book, Anthony T. Edwards extracts from the poem a picture of the social structure of Ascra, the hamlet in northern Greece where Hesiod lived, most likely during the seventh century b.c.e. Drawing on the evidence of trade, food storage, reciprocity, and the agricultural regime as Hesiod describes them in Works and Days, Edwards reveals Ascra as an autonomous village, outside the control of a polis, less stratified and integrated internally than what we observe even in Homer. In light of this reading, theconflict between Hesiod and Perses emerges as a dispute about the inviolability of the community's external boundary and the degree of interobligation among those within the village. Hesiod's Ascra directly counters the accepted view of Works and Days, which has Hesiod describing a peasant society subordinated to the economic and political control of an outside elite. Through his deft analysis, Edwards suggests a new understanding of both Works and Days and the social and economic organization of Hesiod's time and place.

Works of Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns

This volume unites Hine's skillful translations of the Works of Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns—along with Hine's rendering of the mock-Homeric epic The Battle of the Frogs and the Mice—in a stunning pairing of these masterful classics.

Works of Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns

Winner of the 2005 Harold Morton Landon Translation Award from the Academy of American Poets. In Works of Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns, highly acclaimed poet and translator Daryl Hine brings to life the words of Hesiod and the world of Archaic Greece. While most available versions of these early Greek writings are rendered in prose, Hine's illuminating translations represent these early classics as they originally appeared, in verse. Since prose was not invented as a literary medium until well after Hesiod's time, presenting these works as poems more closely approximates not only the mechanics but also the melody of the originals. This volume includes Hesiod's Works and Days and Theogony, two of the oldest non-Homeric poems to survive from antiquity. Works and Days is in part a farmer's almanac—filled with cautionary tales and advice for managing harvests and maintaining a good work ethic—and Theogony is the earliest comprehensive account of classical mythology—including the names and genealogies of the gods (and giants and monsters) of Olympus, the sea, and the underworld. Hine brings out Hesiod's unmistakable personality; Hesiod's tales of his escapades and his gritty and persuasive voice not only give us a sense of the author's own character but also offer up a rare glimpse of the everyday life of ordinary people in the eighth century BCE. In contrast, the Homeric Hymns are more distant in that they depict aristocratic life in a polished tone that reveals nothing of the narrators' personalities. These hymns (so named because they address the deities in short invocations at the beginning and end of each) are some of the earliest examples of epyllia, or short stories in the epic manner in Greek. This volume unites Hine's skillful translations of the Works of Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns—along with Hine's rendering of the mock-Homeric epic The Battle of the Frogs and the Mice—in a stunning pairing of these masterful classics.

Hesiod Theogony Works and days Testimonia

None of these is now thought to be by Hesiod himself, but all have considerable literary and historical interest.

Hesiod  Theogony  Works and days  Testimonia

The two extant poems of Hesiod (eighth or seventh century BCE) are "Theogony," in which he charts the history of the divine world, and "Works and Days," in which he delivers moral precepts and practical advice for the world of men.

Homer and Hesiod

To understand their innovations properly, this work begins with the presentation of an account of the nature of religion and myth and in particular of the disclosure of truth achieved in myth.

Homer and Hesiod

Homer and Hesiod, Myth and Philosophy is a study of the nature and function of the poetry of Homer and Hesiod when their work is considered in historical context as the initial significant developments of poetry as a distinctive voice for truth beyond religion and myth. To understand their innovations properly, this work begins with the presentation of an account of the nature of religion and myth and in particular of the disclosure of truth achieved in myth. Then it takes up the Homeric and Hesiodic innovations which transform the bardic poetry that was heritage from at least Mycenaean times and that make the inspired poet an educative voice for truth. After giving an account of the four major poems in which this transformation is embodied: Illiad and Odyssey, Theogony and Works and Days, the work concludes with a discussion of how these creations shaped the matrix within which philosophy arose. In this way it points to why the distinctive realization of philosophy in Greece (as contrasted with that in China and India) involved what the Platonic Socrates can speak of as "an ancient quarrel between poetry and philosophy."

Hesiod s Theogony

Tracing the poem's reception in the Byzantine, medieval, and early Renaissance, including Petrarch and Erasmus, the book ends with a lengthy exploration of Milton's imitations of the poem in Paradise Lost.

Hesiod s Theogony

Stephen Scully both offers a reading of Hesiod's Theogony and traces the reception and shadows of this authoritative Greek creation story in Greek and Roman texts up to Milton's own creation myth, which sought to "soar above th' Aonian Mount [i.e., the Theogony]...and justify the ways of God to men." Scully also considers the poem in light of Near Eastern creation stories, including the Enûma elish and Genesis, as well as the most striking of modern "scientific myths," Freud's Civilization and its Discontents. Scully reads Hesiod's poem as a hymn to Zeus and a city-state creation myth, arguing that Olympus is portrayed as an idealized polity and--with but one exception--a place of communal harmony. This reading informs his study of the Theogony's reception in later writings about polity, discord, and justice. The rich and various story of reception pays particular attention to the long Homeric Hymns, Solon, the Presocratics, Pindar, Aeschylus, Aristophanes, and Plato in the Archaic and Classical periods; to the Alexandrian scholars, Callimachus, Euhemerus, and the Stoics in the Hellenistic period; to Ovid, Apollodorus, Lucian, a few Church fathers, and the Neoplatonists in the Roman period. Tracing the poem's reception in the Byzantine, medieval, and early Renaissance, including Petrarch and Erasmus, the book ends with a lengthy exploration of Milton's imitations of the poem in Paradise Lost. Scully also compares what he considers Hesiod's artful interplay of narrative, genealogical lists, and keen use of personified abstractions in the Theogony to Homeric narrative techniques and treatment of epic verse.

Works and Days Theogony and the Shield of Heracles

Like his contemporary, Homer, Hesiod artfully relates the struggles and triumphs of the gods as he offers moral and practical advice for earthbound mortals.

Works and Days  Theogony and the Shield of Heracles

These three classics of Greek literature — often called extended poems — helped bridge the oral and written traditions of Greek civilization. Like his contemporary, Homer, Hesiod artfully relates the struggles and triumphs of the gods as he offers moral and practical advice for earthbound mortals. A poetic treatise on agriculture and farming, Works and Days also presents instructions for daily life and social behavior. Theogony, on the other hand, concerns the origins of the gods, from the battle between the Titans to the ultimate triumph of Zeus. The Shield of Heracles holds further adventure, recounting one of the legendary hero's epic battles. This scrupulously accurate and readable translation is essential for students of Greek mythology and literature.

The Remains of Hesiod Translated Into English Verse with a Preliminary Dissertation on the Life Writings and ra of Hesiod and Illustrative Notes by Charles Abraham Elton

Hesiod, Sir Charles Abraham ELTON ... Had the Iliad been mutilated and broken
into rem . nants like the poems of Hesiod , similar detached parts of it would
probably have come down to us with separate titles , and in like mander have
found ...

The Remains of Hesiod  Translated     Into English Verse  with a Preliminary Dissertation on the Life  Writings and   ra of Hesiod  and Illustrative Notes by Charles Abraham Elton


Ancient Greek Civilization

The Poems of Hesiod The Development of Hero Cult The Poems of Homer The
earliest works of Greek literature, the poetry of Hesiod and Homer, are explored
in this chapter. In his Theogony (ca. 700 BC), Hesiod tries to account in poetic
form ...

Ancient Greek Civilization

A concise narrative of Greek history and an analysis of the literature, art, and thought of the ancient Greeks. Tells the story of Greek civilization from the from the Minoan Period to the time of the Byzantine Empire Surveys the remarkable culture and history the ancient Greeks Explores the ways in which Greek civilization has been continually reinvented from antiquity to the present day Updated edition includes additional illustrations, maps, and timelines, a glossary, and an annotated bibliography

A Commentary on Hesiod

This is a word-for-word commentary on the first part (vv. 1-382) of Hesiod's Works and Days.

A Commentary on Hesiod

This is a word-for-word commentary on the first part (vv. 1-382) of Hesiod's Works and Days. Special attention has been paid to peculiarities of grammar and idiom, but also to figures of style and the poet's train of thought. All interpretations - many of them which are new - are documented as fully, but at the same time as concisely, as possible. This documentation, which will prove useful for the interpretation of many other texts, has been made more easily accesible by detailed indexes. Discussion of other views plays a considerable part in the commentary and will help the reader avoid a great number of minor and major misunderstandings. The commentary has been confined to the first part of the poem because this seemed to be more in need of a thorough explanation than the rest. It is also the most interesting part in so far as it forms a kind of manual of social morality. The basis concepts of this doctrine are carefully defined in the commentary, and their historical implications are briefly indicated.