The Politics of the Body in Weimar Germany

Based on a wealth of archive material, much of which had been previously neglected, this book examines the remarkable progress made in Weimar Germany toward reproductive freedom and maternity protection.

The Politics of the Body in Weimar Germany

Based on a wealth of archive material, much of which had been previously neglected, this book examines the remarkable progress made in Weimar Germany toward reproductive freedom and maternity protection. Social and political upheaval after the First World War, including a rapidly declining birthrate, the decisive influence of socialists in government, and the advent of Germany's first female politicians, made possible progressive legislation and reforms in the areas of welfare, abortion, and contraception. These advances afforded women an unprecedented measure of control over their lives, but also stimulated state intervention in reproduction. The attempts to restore national fortunes by means of biological politics shed new light on Weimar society and reveal new tensions between the sexes, classes, and generations. The increasing emphasis on eugenics reduced women's freedom by sacrificing individual aspirations to collective interests in the name of regeneration for the Volk.

The Politics of the Body in Weimar Germany

This book analyses how the Weimar Republic put Germany in the forefront of social reform and women's emancipation with wide-ranging maternal welfare programmes and labour protection laws.

The Politics of the Body in Weimar Germany

This book analyses how the Weimar Republic put Germany in the forefront of social reform and women's emancipation with wide-ranging maternal welfare programmes and labour protection laws. Its enlightened policy of family planning and liberalised abortion laws offered women a new measure of control over their lives. But the new politics of the body also increased state intervention, the power of the medical profession and the tendency to sacrifice women's rights to national interests whenever the Volk seemed in danger of 'racial decline'.

The Politics of the Body in Weimar Germany

Official schemes in imperial Germany may well have been as much a tactical device used by the government, who wanted to be seen to exert control, as a programme aimed at practical results. It seems likely, therefore, that Weimar ...

The Politics of the Body in Weimar Germany

This book analyses how the Weimar Republic put Germany in the forefront of social reform and women's emancipation with wide-ranging maternal welfare programmes and labour protection laws. Its enlightened policy of family planning and liberalised abortion laws offered women a new measure of control over their lives. But the new politics of the body also increased state intervention, the power of the medical profession and the tendency to sacrifice women's rights to national interests whenever the Volk seemed in danger of 'racial decline'.

Cultures of Abortion in Weimar Germany

Based on an exceptionally rich source of material, this study explores different attitudes and experiences of those women who sought to terminate an unwanted pregnancy in the Weimar Republic, and those who helped or hindered them.

Cultures of Abortion in Weimar Germany

Based on an exceptionally rich source of material, this study explores different attitudes and experiences of those women who sought to terminate an unwanted pregnancy in the Weimar Republic, and those who helped or hindered them.

Degeneration and Revolution

An important reexamination of the cultural left in Germany during the Weimer period.

Degeneration and Revolution

In Degeneration And Revolution: Radical Cultural Politics and the Body in Weimar Germany Robert Heynen explores the impact of conceptions of degeneration - exemplified by eugenics and social hygiene - on the social, cultural and political history of the left in Germany, 1914-33. Demonstrably, hygienic practices of bodily regulation were integral to the extension of modern capitalist social relations, and profoundly shaped Weimar culture.

Lustmord

Maria Tatar's book opens up an important discussion for readers seeking to understand the forces behind sexual violence and its portrayal in the cultural media throughout this century.

Lustmord

In a book that confronts our society's obsession with sexual violence, Maria Tatar seeks the meaning behind one of the most disturbing images of twentieth-century Western culture: the violated female corpse. This image is so prevalent in painting, literature, film, and, most recently, in mass media, that we rarely question what is at stake in its representation. Tatar, however, challenges us to consider what is taking place--both artistically and socially--in the construction and circulation of scenes depicting sexual murder. In examining images of sexual murder (Lustmord), she produces a riveting study of how art and murder have intersected in the sexual politics of culture from Weimar Germany to the present. Tatar focuses attention on the politically turbulent Weimar Republic, often viewed as the birthplace of a transgressive avant-garde modernism, where representations of female sexual mutilation abound. Here a revealing episode in the gender politics of cultural production unfolds as male artists and writers, working in a society consumed by fear of outside threats, envision women as enemies that can be contained and mastered through transcendent artistic expression. Not only does Tatar show that male artists openly identified with real-life sexual murderers--George Grosz posed as Jack the Ripper in a photograph where his model and future wife was the target of his knife--but she also reveals the ways in which victims were disavowed and erased. Tatar first analyzes actual cases of sexual murder that aroused wide public interest in Weimar Germany. She then considers how the representation of murdered women in visual and literary works functions as a strategy for managing social and sexual anxieties, and shows how violence against women can be linked to the war trauma, to urban pathologies, and to the politics of cultural production and biological reproduction. In exploring the complex relationship between victim and agent in cases of sexual murder, Tatar explains how the roles came to be destabilized and reversed, turning the perpetrator of criminal deeds into a defenseless victim of seductive evil. Throughout the West today, the creation of similar ideological constructions still occurs in societies that have only recently begun to validate the voices of its victims. Maria Tatar's book opens up an important discussion for readers seeking to understand the forces behind sexual violence and its portrayal in the cultural media throughout this century.

Weimar Germany

Weimar Germany also shows that beneath this glossy veneer lay political turmoil that ultimately led to the demise of the republic and the rise of the radical Right.

Weimar Germany

The definitive history of Weimar politics, culture, and society A New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice A Financial Times Best Book of the Year Thoroughly up-to-date, skillfully written, and strikingly illustrated, Weimar Germany brings to life an era of unmatched creativity in the twentieth century—one whose influence and inspiration still resonate today. Eric Weitz has written the authoritative history that this fascinating and complex period deserves, and he illuminates the uniquely progressive achievements and even greater promise of the Weimar Republic. Weitz reveals how Germans rose from the turbulence and defeat of World War I and revolution to forge democratic institutions and make Berlin a world capital of avant-garde art. He explores the period’s groundbreaking cultural creativity, from architecture and theater, to the new field of "sexology"—and presents richly detailed portraits of some of the Weimar’s greatest figures. Weimar Germany also shows that beneath this glossy veneer lay political turmoil that ultimately led to the demise of the republic and the rise of the radical Right. Yet for decades after, the Weimar period continued to powerfully influence contemporary art, urban design, and intellectual life—from Tokyo to Ankara, and Brasilia to New York. Featuring a new preface, this comprehensive and compelling book demonstrates why Weimar is an example of all that is liberating and all that can go wrong in a democracy.

Weimar Publics Weimar Subjects

This collection offers new perspectives from leading scholars in the disciplines of history, art history, film studies, and German studies on the vibrant political culture of Germany in the 1920s.

Weimar Publics Weimar Subjects

In spite of having been short-lived, "Weimar" has never lost its fascination. Until recently the Weimar Republic's place in German history was primarily defined by its catastrophic beginning and end - Germany's defeat in 1918 and the Nazi seizure of power in 1933; its history seen mainly in terms of politics and as an arena of flawed decisions and failed compromises. However, a flourishing of interdisciplinary scholarship on Weimar political culture is uncovering arenas of conflict and change that had not been studied closely before, such as gender, body politics, masculinity, citizenship, empire and borderlands, visual culture, popular culture and consumption. This collection offers new perspectives from leading scholars in the disciplines of history, art history, film studies, and German studies on the vibrant political culture of Germany in the 1920s. From the traumatic ruptures of defeat, revolution, and collapse of the Kaiser's state, the visionaries of Weimar went on to invent a republic, calling forth new citizens and cultural innovations that shaped the republic far beyond the realms of parliaments and political parties.

The Weimar Republic Sourcebook

Drawing from such primary sources as magazines, newspapers, manifestoes, and official documents (many unknown even to specialists and most never before available in English), this book challenges the traditional boundaries between politics, ...

The Weimar Republic Sourcebook

A laboratory for competing visions of modernity, the Weimar Republic (1918-1933) continues to haunt the imagination of the twentieth century. Its political and cultural lessons retain uncanny relevance for all who seek to understand the tensions and possibilities of our age. The Weimar Republic Sourcebook represents the most comprehensive documentation of Weimar culture, history, and politics assembled in any language. It invites a wide community of readers to discover the richness and complexity of the turbulent years in Germany before Hitler's rise to power. Drawing from such primary sources as magazines, newspapers, manifestoes, and official documents (many unknown even to specialists and most never before available in English), this book challenges the traditional boundaries between politics, culture, and social life. Its thirty chapters explore Germany's complex relationship to democracy, ideologies of "reactionary modernism," the rise of the "New Woman," Bauhaus architecture, the impact of mass media, the literary life, the tradition of cabaret and urban entertainment, and the situation of Jews, intellectuals, and workers before and during the emergence of fascism. While devoting much attention to the Republic's varied artistic and intellectual achievements (the Frankfurt School, political theater, twelve-tone music, cultural criticism, photomontage, and urban planning), the book is unique for its inclusion of many lesser-known materials on popular culture, consumerism, body culture, drugs, criminality, and sexuality; it also contains a timetable of major political events, an extensive bibliography, and capsule biographies. This will be a major resource and reference work for students and scholars in history; art; architecture; literature; social and political thought; and cultural, film, German, and women's studies.

Weimar Germany

while Atina Grossmann, '''Girlkultur'' or thoroughly rationalized female: a new woman in Weimar Germany? ... female body as a site of conflict has been made by Cornelie Usborne, The Politics of the Body in Weimar Germany (London, 1992), ...

Weimar Germany

The Weimar Republic was born out of Germany's defeat in the First World War and ended with the coming to power of Hitler and his Nazi Party in 1933. In many ways, it is a wonder that Weimar lasted as long as it did. Besieged from the outset by hostile forces, the young republic was threatened by revolution from the left and coups d'états from the right. Plagued early on by a wave of high-profile political assassinations and a period of devastating hyper-inflation, its later years were dominated by the onset of the Great Depression. And yet, for a period from the mid-1920s it looked as if the Weimar system would not only survive but even flourish, with the return of economic stability and the gradual reintegration of the country into the international community. With contributions from an international team of ten experts, this volume in the Short Oxford History of Germany series offers an ideal introduction to Weimar Germany, challenging the reader to rethink preconceived ideas of the republic and throwing new light on important areas, such as military ideas for reshaping society after the First World War, constitutional and social reform, Jewish life, gender, and culture.

Women and Modernity in Weimar Germany

The Politics of the Body in Weimar Germany : Women's Reproductive Rights and Duties . London , 1992 . Vaerting . M. Die weibliche Eigenart im Männerstaat und die männliche Eigenart im Frauenstaat . Karlsruhe , 1931 . Valentin , Veit .

Women and Modernity in Weimar Germany

This book focuses on the popular fiction of Weimar Germany and explores the relationship between women, the texts they read, and the society in which they lived. A complex picture emerges that shows women talking center stage, not only in the fiction but also in the reality that shaped its fictional representations. One of the author's significant conclusions is that it was the growing strength of female subjectivity, its strong positioning, and its insistent claim to visibility that occupied the imaginations and fears of Weimar culture and contributed in an important way to the crisis that afflicted the Weimar Republic.

Weimar Thought

On population politics, see Cornelie Usborne, The Politics of the Body in Weimar Germany: Women's Reproductive Rights and Duties (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1992); James Woycke, Birth Control in Germany 1871–1933 (London: ...

Weimar Thought

A comprehensive look at the intellectual and cultural innovations of the Weimar period During its short lifespan, the Weimar Republic (1918–33) witnessed an unprecedented flowering of achievements in many areas, including psychology, political theory, physics, philosophy, literary and cultural criticism, and the arts. Leading intellectuals, scholars, and critics—such as Hannah Arendt, Walter Benjamin, Ernst Bloch, Bertolt Brecht, and Martin Heidegger—emerged during this time to become the foremost thinkers of the twentieth century. Even today, the Weimar era remains a vital resource for new intellectual movements. In this incomparable collection, Weimar Thought presents both the specialist and the general reader a comprehensive guide and unified portrait of the most important innovators, themes, and trends of this fascinating period. The book is divided into four thematic sections: law, politics, and society; philosophy, theology, and science; aesthetics, literature, and film; and general cultural and social themes of the Weimar period. The volume brings together established and emerging scholars from a remarkable array of fields, and each individual essay serves as an overview for a particular discipline while offering distinctive critical engagement with relevant problems and debates. Whether used as an introductory companion or advanced scholarly resource, Weimar Thought provides insight into the rich developments behind the intellectual foundations of modernity.

Sexuality in Modern German History

In Women in Culture and Politics: A Century of Change, edited by Judith Friedlander, Blanche Wiesen Cook, Alice Kessler-Harris, ... The Politics of the Body in Weimar Germany: Women's Reproductive Rights and Duties.

Sexuality in Modern German History

A History of Sexuality in Modern Germany offers both a detailed survey of this key subject and a new intervention in the history of sexuality in modern Germany. It investigates the diverse and often contradictory ways in which individuals, activists, doctors, politicians, artists, social movements and cultural commentators have defined 'normal' or 'natural' sexuality in Germany over the past two centuries. Katie Sutton explores how these definitions have been used to shape identities, behaviors, bodies and practices, particularly around norms of heterosexual, marital, reproductive sex. At the same time, she examines how such ideas enabled the policing of 'unnatural' or 'deviant' bodies and practices. Covering a range of crucial themes, including birth control, prostitution, homosexual rights and heterosexual intimacy, this important text comes with 30 illustrations, a useful glossary and interesting biographical vignettes which help to illuminate the narrative. Primary source extracts and a wealth of secondary literature are also helpfully integrated into the book to enable further insight and analysis. This is a vital volume for all students and scholars with an interested in modern Germany or the history of sexuality in modern Europe.

Weimar Through the Lens of Gender

Winning Women's Votes: Propaganda and Politics in Weimar Germany. ... Lustmord: Sexual Murder in Weimar Germany. ... “Body Biological to Body Politic: Women's Demands for Reproductive Self-Determination in World War I and Early Weimar ...

Weimar Through the Lens of Gender

DIVExploring the social and political struggles over prostitution reform in the Weimar Republic/div

True Story

See Eric D. Weitz, Weimar Germany: Promise and Tragedy (Princeton, NJ: Princeton Univ. ... The Politics of the Body on Weimar Germany: Women's Reproductive Rights and Duties (Ann Arbor: Univ. of Michigan Press, 1992). 86.

True Story

Focusing on Bernarr Macfadden, a bodybuilder turned publishing mogul, Shanon Fitzpatrick charts the rise and export of US mass media and consumer culture. Macfadden’s magazines—featuring fitness tips, celebrity gossip, and sensational “true” stories—created an enduring editorial template and powered worldwide demand for interactive American media.

The Oxford Handbook of the Weimar Republic

See Erich Fromm, The Working Class in Weimar Germany: A Psychological and Sociological Study, tr. Barbara Weinberger (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1984), 98–104. ... Cornelie Usborne, The Politics of the Body in Weimar Germany ...

The Oxford Handbook of the Weimar Republic

The Oxford Handbook of the Weimar Republic is a multi-author survey of German history from 1918 to 1933. Covering a broad range of topics in social, political, economic, and cultural history, it presents an overview of current scholarship, and will help students and teachers to make sense of the contradictions and complexities of Germany's experiments with democracy and modern society in this period. The contributions emphasize the historical openness of Germany's first republic, which was more than just the coming of the Third Reich. The thirty-three chapters, all written by leading experts, contain information and interpretation based on cutting-edge scholarship, and together provides an unsurpassed panorama of the Weimar Republic.

Body by Weimar

Body by Weimar argues that male and female athletes fundamentally recast gender roles during Germany's turbulent post-World War I years and established the basis for a modern body and modern sensibility that remain with us to this day.

Body by Weimar

Body by Weimar argues that male and female athletes fundamentally recast gender roles during Germany's turbulent post-World War I years and established the basis for a modern body and modern sensibility that remain with us to this day.

The Coming of the Third Reich

James Woycke , Birth Control in Germany 1871-1933 ( London , 1988 ) , 113-16 , 121 , 147-8 ; Grossmann , Reforming Sex ; Cornelie Usborne , The Politics of the Body in Weimar Germany : Women's Reproductive Rights and Duties ( London ...

The Coming of the Third Reich

A history of Adolf Hitler's rise to power and the collapse of democracy in Nazi Germany explains why Nazism's ideology of hatred flourished in a country embittered by military defeat and economic disaster following World War I.

The Family in Modern Germany

3 C. Usborne, The Politics of the Body in Weimar Germany: Women's Reproductive Rights and Duties (Ann Arbor, 1992), p. 82; D. Blasius, Ehescheidung in Deutschland 1794–1945 (Göttingen, 1987), pp. 157–8; M. Mouton, From Nurturing the ...

The Family in Modern Germany

This cutting-edge edited collection examines the impact of political and social change upon the modern German family. By analysing different family structures, gender roles, social class aspects and children's socialization, The Family in Modern Germany provides a comprehensive and well-balanced overview of how different political systems have shaped modern conceptualizations of the family, from the bourgeois family ideal right up to recent trends like cohabitation and same-sex couples. Beginning with an overview of the 19th-century family, each chapter goes on to examine changes in family type, size and structure across the different decades of the 20th century, with a focus on the relationship between the family and the state, as well as the impact of family policies and laws on the German family. Lisa Pine and her expert team of contributors draw on a wealth of primary sources, including legal documents, diaries, letters and interviews, and the most up-to-date secondary literature to shed new light on the continuities and changes in the history of the family in modern and contemporary Germany. This book is a fantastic resource for scholars, postgraduates and advanced undergraduates studying modern German history, sociology and social policy.