The Politics of Resentment

With The Politics of Resentment, Katherine J. Cramer uncovers an oft-overlooked piece of the puzzle: rural political consciousness and the resentment of the “liberal elite.” Rural voters are distrustful that politicians will respect the ...

The Politics of Resentment

Since the election of Scott Walker, Wisconsin has been seen as ground zero for debates about the appropriate role of government in the wake of the Great Recession. In a time of rising inequality, Walker not only survived a bitterly contested recall that brought thousands of protesters to Capitol Square, he was subsequently reelected. How could this happen? How is it that the very people who stand to benefit from strong government services not only vote against the candidates who support those services but are vehemently against the very idea of big government? With The Politics of Resentment, Katherine J. Cramer uncovers an oft-overlooked piece of the puzzle: rural political consciousness and the resentment of the “liberal elite.” Rural voters are distrustful that politicians will respect the distinct values of their communities and allocate a fair share of resources. What can look like disagreements about basic political principles are therefore actually rooted in something even more fundamental: who we are as people and how closely a candidate’s social identity matches our own. Using Scott Walker and Wisconsin’s prominent and protracted debate about the appropriate role of government, Cramer illuminates the contours of rural consciousness, showing how place-based identities profoundly influence how people understand politics, regardless of whether urban politicians and their supporters really do shortchange or look down on those living in the country. The Politics of Resentment shows that rural resentment—no less than partisanship, race, or class—plays a major role in dividing America against itself.

The Politics of the New South Africa

This book provides an appraisal of critical moments in South Africa's history: segregation and racial supremacy, black opposition, politics under apartheid and violence and terror.

The Politics of the New South Africa

For undergraduate and taught masters courses on modern South Africa as part of a politics, area studies, development studies or combined social sciences degree. This book provides an appraisal of critical moments in South Africa's history: segregation and racial supremacy, black opposition, politics under apartheid and violence and terror. The authors include up-to-date information such as the transfer of power in 1994, enfranchisement and political realignment, the post-electoral period of adjustment and socio-economic transition, the findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the 1999 elections.

The Politics of Ecstasy

Now repackaged with a striking new cover by renowned cyber-artist Brummbauer, this collection of 22 essays, speeches, and interviews, first published in 1968, presents psychedelic pioneer Timothy Leary at his most influential, provocative, ...

The Politics of Ecstasy

Now repackaged with a striking new cover by renowned cyber-artist Brummbauer, this collection of 22 essays, speeches, and interviews, first published in 1968, presents psychedelic pioneer Timothy Leary at his most influential, provocative, and outrageous. Photos & illustrations.

The Politics of Motherhood

Essays and interviews explode the myth of apolitical motherhood by showing how 20th century women have politicized their role as mothers in a wide range of social contexts.

The Politics of Motherhood

Essays and interviews explode the myth of apolitical motherhood by showing how 20th century women have politicized their role as mothers in a wide range of social contexts.

The Politics of European Citizenship

This book is the first of its kind to map the development of EU citizenship and its relation to various localities of EU governance.

The Politics of European Citizenship

As the European Union faces the ongoing challenges of legitimacy, identity, and social cohesion, an understanding of the social purpose and direction of EU citizenship becomes increasingly vital. This book is the first of its kind to map the development of EU citizenship and its relation to various localities of EU governance. From a critical political economy perspective, the authors argue for an integrated analysis of EU citizenship, one that considers the interrelated processes of migration, economic transformation, and social change and the challenges they present.

Justice and the Politics of Difference

"In this classic work of feminist political thought, Iris Marion Young challenges the prevailing reduction of social justice to distributive justice.

Justice and the Politics of Difference

In this classic work of feminist political thought, Iris Marion Young challenges the prevailing reduction of social justice to distributive justice. The starting point for her critique is the experience and concerns of the new social movements that were created by marginal and excluded groups, including women, African Americans, and American Indians, as well as gays and lesbians. Young argues that by assuming a homogeneous public, democratic theorists fail to consider institutional arrangements for including people not culturally identified with white European male norms. Consequently, theorists do not adequately address the problem of an inclusive participatory framework. Basing her vision of the good society on the culturally plural networks of contemporary urban life, Young makes the case that normative theory and public policy should undermine group-based oppression by affirming rather than suppressing social group differences. Danielle Allen's new foreword contextualizes Young's work and explains how debates surrounding social justice have changed since — and been transformed by — the original publication of Justice and the Politics of Difference.

The Politics of Jurisprudence

This text explores what jurisprudence is about, what it seeks to do and how. The book considers how the conclusions of jurisprudence can be brought to bear on everyday problems of legal practice and major social, moral or political issues.

The Politics of Jurisprudence

This text explores what jurisprudence is about, what it seeks to do and how. The book considers how the conclusions of jurisprudence can be brought to bear on everyday problems of legal practice and major social, moral or political issues.

The Politics Book

The Politics Book makes government and politics easy to understand by explaining the big ideas simply, using clear language supported by eye-catching graphics.

The Politics Book

This easy-to-understand guide to politics and government introduces more than 80 of the most important theories and big ideas of leaders and politicians throughout history. The Politics Book makes government and politics easy to understand by explaining the big ideas simply, using clear language supported by eye-catching graphics. The key events in political history are outlined from the origins of political thinking by Confucius and Aristotle to modern-day activists such as Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela. Helpful mind maps break down their important concepts into bitesize chunks to make the subject accessible to students of politics and anyone with an interest in how government works. A handy reference section also provides a glossary of key terms and a directory of significant political figures. Filled with thought-provoking quotes from great political thinkers such as Nietzsche, Malcolm X, Karl Marx, and Mao Zedong, The Politics Book gives context to the world of government and power.

Multiculturalism and the Politics of Guilt

Linking multiculturalism to a distinctive political and religious context, the book argues that welfare-state democracy, unlike bourgeois liberalism, has rejected the once conventional distinction between government and civil society.

Multiculturalism and the Politics of Guilt

Multiculturalism and the Politics of Guilt extends Paul Gottfried’s examination of Western managerial government’s growth in the last third of the twentieth century. Linking multiculturalism to a distinctive political and religious context, the book argues that welfare-state democracy, unlike bourgeois liberalism, has rejected the once conventional distinction between government and civil society. Gottfried argues that the West’s relentless celebrations of diversity have resulted in the downgrading of the once dominant Western culture. The moral rationale of government has become the consciousness-raising of a presumed majority population. While welfare states continue to provide entitlements and fulfill the other material programs of older welfare regimes, they have ceased to make qualitative leaps in the direction of social democracy. For the new political elite, nationalization and income redistributions have become less significant than controlling the speech and thought of democratic citizens. An escalating hostility toward the bourgeois Christian past, explicit or at least implicit in the policies undertaken by the West and urged by the media, is characteristic of what Gottfried labels an emerging “therapeutic” state. For Gottfried, acceptance of an intrusive political correctness has transformed the religious consciousness of Western, particularly Protestant, society. The casting of “true” Christianity as a religion of sensitivity only toward victims has created a precondition for extensive social engineering. Gottfried examines late-twentieth-century liberal Christianity as the promoter of the politics of guilt. Metaphysical guilt has been transformed into self-abasement in relation to the “suffering just” identified with racial, cultural, and lifestyle minorities. Unlike earlier proponents of religious liberalism, the therapeutic statists oppose anything, including empirical knowledge, that impedes the expression of social and cultural guilt in an effort to raise the self-esteem of designated victims. Equally troubling to Gottfried is the growth of an American empire that is influencing European values and fashions. Europeans have begun, he says, to embrace the multicultural movement that originated with American liberal Protestantism’s emphasis on diversity as essential for democracy. He sees Europeans bringing authoritarian zeal to enforcing ideas and behavior imported from the United States. Multiculturalism and the Politics of Guilt extends the arguments of the author’s earlier After Liberalism. Whether one challenges or supports Gottfried’s conclusions, all will profit from a careful reading of this latest diagnosis of the American condition.

The Politics

Aristotle's opinions form an essential background to the thinking of philosophers such as Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli and Jean Bodin and both his premises and arguments raise questions that are as relevant to modern society as they were to ...

The Politics

Twenty-three centuries after its compilation, 'The Politics' still has much to contribute to this central question of political science. Aristotle's thorough and carefully argued analysis is based on a study of over 150 city constitutions, covering a huge range of political issues in order to establish which types of constitution are best - both ideally and in particular circumstances - and how they may be maintained. Aristotle's opinions form an essential background to the thinking of philosophers such as Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli and Jean Bodin and both his premises and arguments raise questions that are as relevant to modern society as they were to the ancient world.

The Politics of EU Accession

This book examines the politics of EU accession which have evolved during the expansion of the EU, from more procedural conditions to provisions of substantive democracy.

The Politics of EU Accession

This book examines the politics of EU accession; by assessing the experiences of the newly-democratised and acceded Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia, and the challenges that Turkey faces.

The Politics of the Welfare State

TOPICS EDITORS IN PHILIP GABRIEL BRITISH LORNA FOWLER POLITICS Topics in British Politics is a series of up-to-date studies of key political questions. Using the most recent evidence, individual books in the series explore the main ...

The Politics of the Welfare State


The Politics of Antipolitics

This serves only to confirm previous claims of those institutions that order and progress are possible only 382 The Politics of Antipolitics.

The Politics of Antipolitics

First published in 1978 and here updated from the 1989 edition to include more information on the origins of antipolitics and its history in the 19th and early 20th centuries, to emphasize the often illusory transitions to democracy from 1965 to 1995, to explore why and how military rulers accede to elected civilian governments, and to document the military's generally successful defense against accusations of human rights abuses. The 28 essays find that the civilian governments blossoming throughout Latin America are dressing authoritarian institutions in the trappings of protected democracy in order to suppress popular movements and to privilege the market. No index. Paper edition (unseen), $23.95. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

The Politics of Planting

In The Politics of Planting, he provides historical background and examines both the politics behind Israel's afforestation policy its consequences.

The Politics of Planting

On the open landscape of Israel and the West Bank, where pine and cypress forests grow alongside olive groves, tree planting has become symbolic of conflicting claims to the land. Palestinians cultivate olive groves as a vital agricultural resource, while the Israeli government has made restoration of mixed-growth forests a national priority. Although both sides plant for a variety of purposes, both have used tree planting to assert their presence on—and claim to—disputed land. Shaul Ephraim Cohen has conducted an unprecedented study of planting in the region and the control of land it signifies. In The Politics of Planting, he provides historical background and examines both the politics behind Israel's afforestation policy its consequences. Focusing on the open land surrounding Jerusalem and four Palestinian villages outside the city, this study offers a new perspective on the conflict over land use in a region where planting has become a political tool. For the valuable data it presents—collected from field work, previously unpublished documents, and interviews—and the insight it provides into this political struggle, this will be an important book for anyone studying the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

The Politics of Representation

In this important new book, an international team of experts critically examines issues of democratic representation in three culturally diverse nations whose governments are elected under systems of proportional representation - New ...

The Politics of Representation

As societies have become ever more complex, coupled with the increased power of the media, electoral campaigns have become a key focus of political communication research. In this important new book, an international team of experts critically examines issues of democratic representation in three culturally diverse nations whose governments are elected under systems of proportional representation - New Zealand, Germany, and Italy. The authors examine the power plays at work in the development and implementation of proportional representation in their respective countries and they consider the ways in which the electoral system has impacted election campaign strategies. The final chapter by Douglas Kellner (George F. Kellner Philosophy of Education Chair, Social Sciences and Comparative Education, UCLA) relates the issue to contemporary politics in the United States by using the 2000 U.S. presidential election to investigate the ways in which democracy is served, and disserved, by the electoral system.

Community and the Politics of Place

The book offers new insight into the relationship between politics and economics and addresses the question of whether the nation-state is an appropriate entity for the practice of either discipline.

Community and the Politics of Place

Thomas Jefferson envisioned a nation of citizens deeply involved in public life. Today Americans are lamenting the erosion of his ideal. What happened in the intervening centuries? Daniel Kemmis argues that our loss of capacity for public life (which impedes our ability to resolve crucial issues) parallels our loss of a sense of place. A renewed sense of inhabitation, he maintains —of community rooted in place and of people dwelling in that place in a practiced way—can shape politics into a more cooperative and more humanly satisfying enterprise, producing better people, better communities, and better places. The author emphasizes the importance of place by analyzing problems and possibilities of public life in a particular place— those northern states whose settlement marked the end of the old frontier. National efforts to “keep citizens apart” by encouraging them to develop open country and rely upon impersonal, procedural methods for public problems have bred stalemate, frustration, and alienation. As alternatives he suggests how western patterns of inhabitation might engender a more cooperative, face-to-face practice of public life. Community and the Politics of Place also examines our ambivalence about the relationship between cities and rural areas and about the role of corporations in public life. The book offers new insight into the relationship between politics and economics and addresses the question of whether the nation-state is an appropriate entity for the practice of either discipline. The author draws upon the growing literature of civic republicanism for both a language and a vantage point from which to address problems in American public life, but he criticizes that literature for its failure to consider place. Though its focus on a single region lends concreteness to its discussions, Community and the Politics of Place promotes a better understanding of the quality of public life today in all regions of the United States.

The Politics of Englishness

This book provide readers with ready access to and interpretation of the significant literature on "The English Question", and enables them to make sense of the political, historical and cultural factors which constitute that question.

The Politics of Englishness

This book provide readers with ready access to and interpretation of the significant literature on "The English Question", and enables them to make sense of the political, historical and cultural factors which constitute that question.

Baal and the Politics of Poetry

The book argues that the poem, written in the last decades of the Bronze Age, takes aim at the reigning political-theological norms of its day and uses the depiction of a divine world to educate its audience about the nature of human ...

Baal and the Politics of Poetry

Baal and the Politics of Poetry provides a thoroughly new interpretation of the Ugaritic Baal Cycle that simultaneously inaugurates an innovative approach to studying ancient Near Eastern literature within the political context of its production. The book argues that the poem, written in the last decades of the Bronze Age, takes aim at the reigning political-theological norms of its day and uses the depiction of a divine world to educate its audience about the nature of human politics. By attuning ourselves to the specific historical context of this one poem, we can develop more nuanced appreciation of how poetry, politics, and religion have interacted—in antiquity, and beyond.

The Politics of Disgust

The ongoing role of the politics of disgust in welfare policy is revealed here by using content analyses of the news media, the 1996 congressional floor debates, historical evidence and interviews with welfare recipients themselves.

The Politics of Disgust

Winner of the 2006 Race, Ethnicity, and Politics Organized Section Best First Book Award from the American Political Science Association Winner of the 2006 W.E.B. DuBois Book Award from the National Conference of Black Political Scientists Ange-Marie Hancock argues that longstanding beliefs about poor African American mothers were the foundation for the contentious 1996 welfare reform debate that effectively "ended welfare as we know it." By examining the public identity of the so-called welfare queen and its role in hindering democratic deliberation, The Politics of Disgust shows how stereotypes and politically motivated misperceptions about race, class and gender were effectively used to instigate a politics of disgust. The ongoing role of the politics of disgust in welfare policy is revealed here by using content analyses of the news media, the 1996 congressional floor debates, historical evidence and interviews with welfare recipients themselves. Hancock's incisive analysis is both compelling and disturbing, suggesting the great limits of today's democracy in guaranteeing not just fair and equitable policy outcomes, but even a fair chance for marginalized citizens to participate in the process.