The Poor Mouth

"O'Brien was one of the comic geniuses of the 20th century . . . The Poor Mouth is wildly funny and Steadman's drawings catch the spirit." Boston Globe

The Poor Mouth

"O'Brien was one of the comic geniuses of the 20th century . . . The Poor Mouth is wildly funny and Steadman's drawings catch the spirit." Boston Globe

Flann O Brien Bakhtin and Menippean Satire

5 Linguistic Oppression and Cultural Definition in Ireland The Poor Mouth and the Mother Tongue I. n The Poor Mouth O'Brien shifts his sights to the West of Ireland , depicting life among the rural peasants of the Gaeltacht .

Flann O Brien  Bakhtin  and Menippean Satire

This work applies Mikhail Bakhtin's theory of literary discourse and the concept of carnivalisation to the work of Flann O'Brien. The author emphasizes the political and social implications of the writings, arguing that O'Brien maintained a reflexive focus on language throughout his career.

Understanding Global Cultures

Putting on the poor mouth " means making a pretense of being poor or in bad circumstances to gain advantage from creditors or prospective creditors , and the book is a satire on the rural life found in western Ireland .

Understanding Global Cultures

Understanding Global Cultures, Third Edition presents the cultural metaphor as a method for understanding the cultural mindsets of a nation, a cluster of nations, and even of a continent. This method involves identifying some phenomenon, activity or institution of a culture that all or most of its members consider important and with which they identify closely. Metaphors are not stereotypes; rather, they rely upon the features of one critical phenomenon of a culture to describe the entire culture. The characteristics of the metaphor then become the basis for describing and understanding the essential features of the culture. For example, the Italians invented the opera and love it passionately. Five key characteristics of the opera are the overture, spectacle and pageantry, voice, externalization, and the interaction between the lead singers and the chorus. These features are used to describe Italy and its cultural mindset. Thus the metaphor is a guide or map that helps such outsiders as students, travelers, and managers on short-term and long-term assignments understand quickly what members of a culture consider important.

The Literature of Ireland

The Poor Mouth, first published in irish as An Béal Bocht in 1941 and published in english in a translation by Patrick C. Power in 1973, is a blackly comic report on the living death of irish rural deprivation, which can only be ...

The Literature of Ireland

One of Ireland's foremost literary and cultural historians, Terence Brown's command of the intellectual and cultural currents running through the Irish literary canon is second to none, and he has been enormously influential in shaping the field of Irish studies. These essays reflect the key themes of Brown's distinguished career, most crucially his critical engagement with the post-colonial model of Irish cultural and literary history currently dominant in Irish Studies. With essays on major figures such as Yeats, MacNeice, Joyce and Beckett, as well as contemporary authors including Seamus Heaney, Derek Mahon, Michael Longley, Paul Muldoon and Brian Friel, this volume is a major contribution to scholarship, directing scholars and students to new approaches to twentieth-century Irish cultural and literary history.

Narrating Poverty and Precarity in Britain

Indeed, The Poor Mouth is a hilariously funny text well worth reading both for its sheer humour and for the stereotypes about life in the west of Ireland which it deconstructs. 'Stereotype' is used here in the sense of a “preconceived ...

Narrating Poverty and Precarity in Britain

Poverty and precarity have gained a new societal and political presence in the twenty-first century's advanced economies. This is reflected in cultural production, which this book discusses for a wide range of media and genres from the novel to reality television. With a focus on Britain, its chapters divide their attention between current representations of poverty and important earlier narratives that have retained significant relevance today. The book's contributions discuss the representation of social suffering with attention to agencies of enunciation, ethical implications of 'voice' and 'listening', limits of narratability, the pitfalls of sensationalism, voyeurism and sentimentalism, potentials and restrictions inherent in specific representational techniques, modes and genres; cultural markets for poverty and precarity. Overall, the book suggests that analysis of poverty narratives requires an intersection of theoretical reflection and a close reading of texts.

A Day in Our Life

But this is killing two birds with one stone . That is not all of it , though . The Priest gave a new sermon today . He was giving out about constantly crying poverty — the poor mouth ' — and how it was driving people out of the country ...

A Day in Our Life

Publisher description.

Ireland s Great Famine and Popular Politics

poor famine-struck looking woman, with three or four children, the very pictures of starvation and misery«, ... fall into, an« a poor mouth«s the best mouth to make«.56 David Lloyd suggests that in The Black Prophet Carleton ...

Ireland   s Great Famine and Popular Politics

Ireland’s Great Famine of 1845–52 was among the most devastating food crises in modern history. A country of some eight-and-a-half-million people lost one million to hunger and disease and another million to emigration. According to land activist Michael Davitt, the starving made little or no effort to assert "the animal’s right to existence," passively accepting their fate. But the poor did resist. In word and deed, they defied landlords, merchants and agents of the state: they rioted for food, opposed rent and rate collection, challenged the decisions of those controlling relief works, and scorned clergymen who attributed their suffering to the Almighty. The essays collected here examine the full range of resistance in the Great Famine, and illuminate how the crisis itself transformed popular politics. Contributors include distinguished scholars of modern Ireland and emerging historians and critics. This book is essential reading for students of modern Ireland, and the global history of collective action.

Reading Irish American Fiction

Irish poverty was the basis of one of my mother's favorite expressions: “making the poor mouth.” P. W. Joyce defines this phrase as meaning “making out or pretending that you are poor.”2 In my mother's usage, this phrase heaped scorn on ...

Reading Irish American Fiction

This book analyzes five novels, all published between 1989 and 1999, in which the main characters are 'hyphenated people': Americans who are ancestrally joined to, yet realistically separated from, the Irish. Hallissy explores why these characters think of themselves as Irish, though they have know little of Ireland or its people.

Narratives of Class in New Irish and Scottish Literature

(The phrase “to put on a poor mouth” means “making a pretence of being poor or in bad circumstances in order to gain advantage for oneself” [O'Brien 5]). While he was bilingual and published a number of brilliant novels in English, ...

Narratives of Class in New Irish and Scottish Literature

This book argues that the outskirts of cities have become spaces for a new literature beyond boundaries of traditional notions of nation, class, and gender. Includes discussions of Booker Prize winners Roddy Doyle and James Kelman.

Political Ideology in Ireland

An Beal Bocht (The Poor Mouth)2 is a very clear indictment of the vicious British colonial system. This masterpiece written in Gaelic underscores the contradictions and rigid deadlock options implied by the British Empire.

Political Ideology in Ireland

First delivered as part of an international conference held at Brest University in November 2007—under the aegis of the Centre de Recherche Bretonne et Celtique (CRBC)—, this collection of essays essentially aims at interrogating history in order to better understand the political and ideological complexity of early XXIst-century Ireland. This complexity reflects, in many respects, Ireland’s uniqueness among the Western European nations. Some of the multiple persuasions within the gamut of Irish political ideology, from the Enlightenment to the present, are thus explored from diverse angles of approach—dialectical, taxonomic, theoretical, practical, individual, collective—, and through a diverse range of disciplines—human sciences, political science, social sciences, literature, philosophy and art history—and themes—from Jonathan Swift’s rhetorical complexity to the evolution of Irish republicanism after 9/11, including the reassessment of Daniel O’Connell’s political ideology, Owenism in Ireland, Oscar Wilde’s socialistic ideology, the ideological development of the Republican and Loyalist prisoners… This unique collection of essays, far from being a static historiographical description, provides food for thought and sheds light on the fascinating ambivalent dynamics lying at the heart of the building process of a modern nation resulting from the aggregate of individual will, collective ideals and Zeitgeist. The impressive variety of issues raised by authors of diverse origins (United States, Ireland, Britain, France), including leading experts in the above-mentioned areas (Richard English, Robert Mahony, Jonathan Tonge, Kieran Allen, John Sloan, Christopher Murray, Vincent Geoghegan…), therefore, widely contributes to the fact that the present book will be intellectually stimulating and enlightening, at least as an introduction, for all the students and scholars of Irish studies and other related disciplines.

The New Irish Studies

As I have it Heaney winked when he signed her copy of The Poor Mouth. He said: That's a great book. I ground my teeth: she hadn't even read it. It was summer: UV-haze, bitumen fumes, etc. I had read The Poor Mouth – but who was Seamus ...

The New Irish Studies

The New Irish Studies demonstrates how diverse critical approaches enable a richer understanding of contemporary Irish writing and culture. The past two decades in Ireland and Northern Ireland have seen an astonishing rate of change, one that reflects the common understanding of the contemporary as a moment of acceleration and flux. This collection tracks how Irish writers have represented the peace and reconciliation process in Northern Ireland, the consequences of the Celtic Tiger economic boom in the Republic, the waning influence of Catholicism, the increased authority of diverse voices, and an altered relationship with Europe. The essays acknowledge the distinctiveness of contemporary Irish literature, reflecting a sense that the local can shed light on the global, even as they reach beyond the limited tropes that have long identified Irish literature. The collection suggests routes forward for Irish Studies, and unsettles presumptions about what constitutes an Irish classic.

Sub versions

Flann O'Brien's comically literal approach to the conflict between native and imperial tongue in The Poor Mouth does not undermine its seriousness. The main character has a different relation to his own identity than the one in The ...

Sub versions

From Swift's repulsive shit-flinging Yahoos to Beckett's dying but never quite dead moribunds, Irish literature has long been perceived as being synonymous with subversion and all forms of subversiveness. But what constitutes a subversive text or a subversive writer in twenty-first-century Ireland? The essays in this volume set out to redefine and rethink the subversive potential of modern Irish literature. Crossing three central genres, one common denominator running through these essays whether dealing with canonical writers like Yeats, Beckett and Flann O'Brien, or lesser known contemporary writers like Sebastian Barry or Robert McLiam Wilson, is the continual questioning of Irish identity – Irishness – going from its colonial paradigm and stereotype of the subaltern in MacGill, to its uneasy implications for gender representation in the contemporary novel and the contemporary drama. A subsidiary theme inextricably linked to the identity problematic is that of exile and its radical heritage for all Irish writing irrespective of its different genres. Sub-Versions offers a cross-cultural and trans-national response to the expanding interest in Irish and postcolonial studies by bringing together specialists from different national cultures and scholarly contexts – Ireland, Britain, France and Central Europe. The order of the essays is by genre.This study is aimed both at the general literary reader and anyone particularly interested in Irish Studies.

Webster s II New College Dictionary

To use a pony in preparing les- poor - mouth ( poor / mouth ' , -mouth ' ) v . -mouthed , -mouth - ing , -mouths sons . -pony up . Slang . To pay money owed or due . -ut . To speak ill of : BADMOUTH . —vi . To claim poverty as an expony ...

Webster s II New College Dictionary

A newly updated edition of the dictionary features more than 200,000 definitions, as well as revised charts and tables, proofreaders' marks, synonym lists, word histories, and context examples.

Family Romance

Thistrend was parodied, devastatingly, by Flann O'Brien in his novel An Béal Bocht ('The Poor Mouth'), whose title comes from thegreat Irish expression for complaining about how hard a time you're having– 'giving itthe poor mouth'.

Family Romance

In this acclaimed memoir from the award-winning author of Fragrant Harbour and Capital, John Lanchester pieces together his family's past and uncovers their extraordinary secrets - from his grandparents' life in colonial Rhodesia to his mother's time as a nun - with clear-eyed compassion. A true story of family intrigues, of secrets and lies, as they unfold across three generations.

Dental Technicians

The most important . of these are dental caries and periodontal disease . Poor mouth hygiene being a definite factor in the etiology of both of these diseases , it is self - evident that good mouth hygiene will reduce their incidence .

Dental Technicians

Designed for chair assistants, dental x-ray technicians and dental hygienists, this guide provides reference material for the individual dental technicians.

A Dictionary of Hiberno English

See CAM. bealach /ˈbæləx/ n., a gap, a by-way < Ir. 'Drive the cows out through the bealach in the top field' (MG, Cavan). béal bocht /beːlˈbʌxt/ n.phr., the 'poor mouth', pretending to be poor < Ir. 'You're always putting on the béal ...

A Dictionary of Hiberno English

The Dictionary of Hiberno-English is the leading reference book on Hiberno-English – the form of English commonly spoken in Ireland. It connects the spoken and the written language, and is a unique national dictionary that bears witness to Irish history, struggles and the creative identities found in Ireland. Reflecting the social, political, religious and financial changes of people’s ever-evolving lives, it contains words and expressions not usually seen in a dictionary, such as ‘kibosh’, ‘smithereens’, ‘Peggy’s Leg’, ‘hames’, ‘yoke’, ‘blaa’, ‘banjax’ and ‘lubán’. It is a celebration of an irrepressible gift for the creative, expressive and reckless manipulation of the English language!

Journeys in Ireland

The poverty of the countryside was too poor. 4. The Gaelicism of the countryside was too Gaelic. 5. The tradition of the countryside was too traditional. (O'Brien, 1973:1975, 49f.) In its debunking of literary ruralism, The Poor Mouth ...

Journeys in Ireland

This volume offers a reasoned critical account of a wide range of travel writing about rural Ireland. The focus is on work by English travellers who visited Ireland for pleasure, from the ’scenic tourists’ of the post-Romantic period to Eric Newby in the 1980s. Ryle also discusses accounts by American and English anthropologists, as well as writing by Irish authors including J.M. Synge, George Moore, Sean O’Faolain and Colm Tóibín. The materials reviewed and discussed here, including many books which are now difficult to find, offer illuminating and sometimes entertaining evidence about the development of tourism. Ryle also shows how the discourses and practices of pleasurable travel have intersected with and been marked by the dimensions of power and proprietorship, hegemony, and resistance, which have characterised Anglo-Irish and Hiberno-English cultural relations over the last two centuries. Journeys in Ireland will interest all those concerned with the literature and history of those relations, and will be an invaluable resource for scholars, teachers and students concerned with travel writing and tourism with and beyond these islands.

Rough Beasts

This ambivalence was eventually articulated in Brian O'Nolan/Flann O'Brien's parody The Poor Mouth (originally published in Irish in 1941 as An Béal Bocht, under the pseudonym Myles na gCopaleen). The title comes from an Irish ...

Rough Beasts

Monsters and other supernatural malefactors disrupt the human world in distinct ways: werewolves and cunning beasts challenge the philosophical distinction between human and animal; demons offer deceptive pacts to prey upon our delusions of mastery over the world; capricious fairies claim dominion over the landscape and exact disproportionate revenge for our intrusions. When a monster appears, human history must halt until it departs. Irish history, meanwhile, has been punctured by dramatic ruptures, such as the Great Famine of 1845 to 1849. Monstrous imagery flourishes in these ruptures, so it is hardly surprising that Irish literature boasts a great many rough beasts and ravenous corpses. In this book, various monsters from Irish literature are considered in different historical contexts, to illustrate the role of horror and monstrosity in Ireland's history and culture. In both English- and Irish-language texts, from the Act of Union to the death of the Celtic Tiger, hordes of night-creatures arise in times of crisis, embodying chaos and absurdity. Building upon the critical framework established in Irish Science Fiction (2014), this study looks at the specific ways in which ghosts, malevolent magicians, shape-shifters, cryptids and the corporeal undead oppose human agency by 'breaking history'.

Flann O Brien Modernism

second major counter-pastoral: The Poor Mouth. Kavanagh's quietly despairing Maguire is matched by O'Nolan's Bonaparte O'Coonassa, a peasant of open heart and low intelligence. O'Nolan's Corkadoragha, a fictional region on Ireland's ...

Flann O Brien   Modernism

Flann O'Brien & Modernism brings a much-needed refreshment to the state of scholarship on this increasingly recognised but still widely misunderstood 'second generation' modernist. Rather than construe him as a postmodernist, it correctly locates O'Brien's work as the product of a late modernist sensibility and cultural context. Similarly, while there should be no doubt of his Irishness, and his profound debts to Irish language, history and culture, this collection seeks to understand O'Brien's nationally sensitive achievement as the work of an internationalist whose preoccupations reflect global modernist trends. The distinct themes and concerns tracked in Flann O'Brien & Modernism include characterization in branching narrative forms; the ethics and paradoxes of naming; parody and homage; lies and deception; theatricality; sexuality; technology and transport; and the inevitable matter of drink and intoxication. Taken together, these specific topics construct a mosaic image of O'Brien as an exemplary modernist auteur, abreast of all the most salient philosophical and technical concerns affecting literary production in the period immediately before and after World War Two.

Joycean Legacies

For example, the section titles for Chapter 2 of The Poor Mouth read: 'A BAD SMELL IN OUR HOUSE – THE PIGS – THE COMING OF AMBROSE – THE HARD LIFE – MY MOTHER IN DANGER OF DEATH – MARTIN'S PLAN – WE ARE SAVED AND ARE SAFE – THE DEATH OF ...

Joycean Legacies

These twelve essays analyze the complex pleasures and problems of engaging with James Joyce for subsequent writers, discussing Joyce's textual, stylistic, formal, generic, and biographical influence on an intriguing selection of Irish, British, American, and postcolonial writers from the 1940s to the twenty-first century.