The Problems of Genocide

The Problems of Genocide contends that this violence is the consequence of 'permanent security' imperatives: the striving of states, and armed groups seeking to found states, to make themselves invulnerable to threats.

The Problems of Genocide

Genocide is not only a problem of mass death, but also of how, as a relatively new idea and law, it organizes and distorts thinking about civilian destruction. Taking the normative perspective of civilian immunity from military attack, A. Dirk Moses argues that the implicit hierarchy of international criminal law, atop which sits genocide as the 'crime of crimes', blinds us to other types of humanly caused civilian death, like bombing cities, and the 'collateral damage' of missile and drone strikes. Talk of genocide, then, can function ideologically to detract from systematic violence against civilians perpetrated by governments of all types. The Problems of Genocide contends that this violence is the consequence of 'permanent security' imperatives: the striving of states, and armed groups seeking to found states, to make themselves invulnerable to threats.

NIOD Rewind Episode 14

How does the legal concept of genocide distort our thinking about civilian destruction? What does genocide, as the 'crime of crimes' still mean for other types of humanly caused civilian death, like bombing cities and drone strikes?

NIOD Rewind Episode 14

What are the problems of genocide and how to rethink mass death? In this episode Anne van Mourik and Thijs Bouwknegt interview historian Dirk Moses, whose book 'The Problems of Genocide: Permanent Security and the Language of Transgression' just came out. How does the legal concept of genocide distort our thinking about civilian destruction? What does genocide, as the ‘crime of crimes’ still mean for other types of humanly caused civilian death, like bombing cities and drone strikes?

The Problems of Genocide

Another problem of genocide, then, is its participation in the discursive construction of identity-based violence against ...

The Problems of Genocide

Historically delineates the problems of genocide as a concept in relation to rival categories of mass violence.

The Widening Circle of Genocide

This work is distinguished by its excellence, originality, and depth of its scholarship. The first volume was selected by the American Library Association for its list of "Outstanding Academic Books of 1988-89.

The Widening Circle of Genocide

The Widening Circle of Genocide, the third volume of an award-winning series, combines an encyclopedic summary of knowledge of the subject with annotated citations of literature in each field of study. It includes contributions by R.J. Rummel, Leonard Glick, Vahakn Dadrian, Rosanne Klass, Martin Van Bruinessen, James Dunn, Gabrielle Tyrnauer, Robert Krell, George Kent, Samuel Totten, and a foreword by Irving Louis Horowitz. This volume presents scholarship on a variety of topics, including: Germany's records of the Armenian genocide; little-known cases of contemporary genocide in Afghanistan, East Timor, and of the Kurds; a provocative new interpretation of the psychic scarring of Holocaust survivors; and nongovernmental organizations that have undertaken the beginnings of scholarship on the worldwide problems of genocide. The Widening Circle of Genocide embodies reverence for human life; its goal is the search for new means to prevent genocide. This work is distinguished by its excellence, originality, and depth of its scholarship. The first volume was selected by the American Library Association for its list of "Outstanding Academic Books of 1988-89." It is both compelling reading and an invaluable tool for scholars and students who wish to pursue specific fields of study of genocide. It will also be of interest to political scientists, historians, psychologists, and religion scholars.

The Concept of Genocide in International Criminal Law

This book presents a review of historical and emerging legal issues that concern the interpretation of the international crime of genocide.

The Concept of Genocide in International Criminal Law

This book presents a review of historical and emerging legal issues that concern the interpretation of the international crime of genocide. The Polish legal expert Raphael Lemkin formulated the concept of genocide during the Nazi occupation of Europe, and it was then incorporated into the 1948 Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. This volume looks at the issues that are raised both by the existing international law definition of genocide and by the possible developments that continue to emerge under international criminal law. The authors consider how the concept of genocide might be used in different contexts, and see whether the definition in the 1948 convention may need some revision, also in the light of the original ideas that were expressed by Lemkin. The book focuses on specific themes that allow the reader to understand some of the problems related to the legal definition of genocide, in the context of historical and recent developments. As a valuable contribution to the debate on the significance, meaning and application of the crime of genocide the book will be essential reading for students and academics working in the areas of Legal History, International Criminal Law, Human Rights, and Genocide Studies.

A Problem From Hell

Discusses America's political stance during the holocausts of the past fifty years, presenting moral arguments for why the United States should change its non-engagement policies to become involved in conflicts involving genocide. 30,000 ...

A Problem From Hell

Discusses America's political stance during the holocausts of the past fifty years, presenting moral arguments for why the United States should change its non-engagement policies to become involved in conflicts involving genocide. 30,000 first printing.

Problems of Genocide

Problems of Genocide


The Prevention and Intervention of Genocide

This volume, the latest in a widely respected series on the subject of genocide, provides an overview of a host of issues germane to this task.

The Prevention and Intervention of Genocide

Over the last twenty years the world has witnessed four major genocides. There was the genocide in Iraq (1988), in Rwanda (1994), in Srebrenica (1995), and in Darfur (2003 and continuing). Most observers agree there is an urgent need to assess the international community's efforts to prevent genocide and to intervene (once a genocide is under way) in an effective and timely manner. This volume, the latest in a widely respected series on the subject of genocide, provides an overview of a host of issues germane to this task. The book begins with a cogent discussion of the issues of prevention and intervention during the Cold War years. The second chapter discusses the abject failures and moderate (though, in some cases, highly controversial) successes at prevention and intervention carried out in the 1990s and early 2000s. Further chapters examine latest efforts to develop an effective genocide early warning system and examine the complexity of and barriers to prevention. The pros and cons of sanctions and the problems of enforcement and evaluation their effectiveness are then discussed. Conflicts between state sovereignty and the protection of threatened populations are examined both in historical context and by incorporating the latest thinking. Later chapters treat the issue of intervention; why and how it has met with only limited success. Concentrating on Rwanda and Srebrenica, chapter 8 discusses various peace operations that were abject failures and those that were moderately successful. The concept of an anti-genocide regime is examined in terms of progress in developing such a regime as well as what the international community must do in order to implement it. Chapters discuss key issues related to post-genocidal periods, those that need to be addressed in order to establish stability in a wounded land and populace as well as to prevent future genocides. The final chapter asks whether bringing perpetrators to justice has any impact in breaking impunity, ensuring deterrence, and bringing about reconciliation. The contributors to the volume are all noted scholars, some of whom specialize in the study of genocide, and others who specialize in such areas as early warning, peacekeeping, and sanctions.

Genocide

This book presents the background and history of genocide, the key issues associated with this worldwide crime, and the problems inherent in preventing its occurrence.

Genocide

This book presents the background and history of genocide, the key issues associated with this worldwide crime, and the problems inherent in preventing its occurrence. * Provides a chronological timeline of genocide from 1900 to present day * Includes related content such as brief biographies of major 20th century leaders accused of genocide, bilateral immunity agreements involving the United States from 2003 to 2009, and a directory of organizations that have worked to prevent or end genocide * Addresses key issues such as the motivations for genocide; the perpetrators, victims, and bystanders; and the eight stages of genocide * Contains an annotative bibliography of print and nonprint resources

The Prevention and Intervention of Genocide

This volume, the latest in a widely respected series on the subject of genocide, provides an overview of a host of issues germane to this task.

The Prevention and Intervention of Genocide

Over the last twenty years the world has witnessed four major genocides. There was the genocide in Iraq (1988), in Rwanda (1994), in Srebrenica (1995), and in Darfur (2003 and continuing). Most observers agree there is an urgent need to assess the international community's efforts to prevent genocide and to intervene (once a genocide is under way) in an effective and timely manner. This volume, the latest in a widely respected series on the subject of genocide, provides an overview of a host of issues germane to this task. The book begins with a cogent discussion of the issues of prevention and intervention during the Cold War years. The second chapter discusses the abject failures and moderate (though, in some cases, highly controversial) successes at prevention and intervention carried out in the 1990s and early 2000s. Further chapters examine latest efforts to develop an effective genocide early warning system and examine the complexity of and barriers to prevention. The pros and cons of sanctions and the problems of enforcement and evaluation their effectiveness are then discussed. Conflicts between state sovereignty and the protection of threatened populations are examined both in historical context and by incorporating the latest thinking. Later chapters treat the issue of intervention; why and how it has met with only limited success. Concentrating on Rwanda and Srebrenica, chapter 8 discusses various peace operations that were abject failures and those that were moderately successful. The concept of an anti-genocide regime is examined in terms of progress in developing such a regime as well as what the international community must do in order to implement it. Chapters discuss key issues related to post-genocidal periods, those that need to be addressed in order to establish stability in a wounded land and populace as well as to prevent future genocides. The final chapter asks whether bringing perpetrators to justice has any impact in breaking impunity, ensuring deterrence, and bringing about reconciliation. The contributors to the volume are all noted scholars, some of whom specialize in the study of genocide, and others who specialize in such areas as early warning, peacekeeping, and sanctions.

The Magnitude of Genocide

This book defines genocide, distinguishing it from mass murder, war crimes, and other atrocities; allows readers to grasp the magnitude of the crime of genocide across time and throughout human civilization; and facilitates an understanding ...

The Magnitude of Genocide

This book defines genocide, distinguishing it from mass murder, war crimes, and other atrocities; allows readers to grasp the magnitude of the crime of genocide across time and throughout human civilization; and facilitates an understanding of new and potential cases of genocide as they occur. • Illustrates the myriad problems inherent in genocide prevention and in the punishment of perpetrators • Analyzes why the nation-states that have the capacity to prevent or intervene against a genocide typically avoid doing so • Discusses the nature of and reasons underlying genocide denial • Examines the different kinds and scales of the impact of genocide on victim groups and on the perpetrators

Prevention of Genocide Under International Law

This leads to a clarification of that legal obligation by filling it with concrete international legal measures to be taken by both States and the UN at each level, and by suggesting improvements, which include the creation of national and ...

Prevention of Genocide Under International Law

Genocide is 'the crime of crimes' which shocks the conscience of mankind the most because of the unspeakable damage and pain it causes. This book studies the obligation to prevent genocide under international law and, more particularly, the extent of that obligation under the Genocide Convention and customary international law. Although, this obligation is recognized in public international law, the issue of what this obligation actually entails has not received much attention in scholarly works, nor in practice. Even recent debates focused on intervention at the stage where genocide is about to be committed or is being committed, ignoring prevention at early stages. Yet, such early prevention is pivotal in order to effectively reduce the risk of genocide. Drawing upon, inter alia, the 2007 genocide judgment of the International Court of Justice, this book puts forward a distinction between primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention of genocide. Within this temporal structure, the book analyzes and applies the obligation to prevent genocide by States and the United Nations. This leads to a clarification of that legal obligation by filling it with concrete international legal measures to be taken by both States and the UN at each level, and by suggesting improvements, which include the creation of national and international institutions to actively promote and monitor the prevention of genocide. *** Etienne Ruvebana has been awarded the Max van der Stoel Human Rights Award 2014 for this book. (Series: School of Human Rights Research - Vol. 66) [Subject: Public International Law, Human Rights Law]

Genocide Denials and the Law

In Genocide Denials and the Law, Ludovic Hennebel and Thomas Hochmann offer a thorough study of the relationship between law and genocide denial from the perspectives of specialists from six countries.

Genocide Denials and the Law

In Genocide Denials and the Law, Ludovic Hennebel and Thomas Hochmann offer a thorough study of the relationship between law and genocide denial from the perspectives of specialists from six countries. This controversial topic provokes strong international reactions involving emotion caused by denial along with concerns about freedom of speech. The authors offer an in-depth study of the various legal issues raised by the denial of crimes against humanity, presenting arguments both in favor of and in opposition to prohibition of this expression. They do not adopt a pro or contra position, but include chapters written by proponents and opponents of a legal prohibition on genocide denial. Hennebel and Hochmann fill a void in academic publications by comparatively examining this issue with a collection of original essays. They tackle this diverse topic comprehensively, addressing not only the theoretical and philosophical aspects of denial, but also the specific problems faced by judges who implement anti-denial laws. Genocide Denials and the Law will provoke discussion of many theoretical questions regarding free speech, including the relationship between freedom of expression and truth, hate, memory, and history.

Genocide in International Law

The second edition of this definitive work focuses on the judicial interpretation of the Convention, relying on debates in the International Law Commission, political statements in bodies like the General Assembly of the United Nations and ...

Genocide in International Law

The 1948 Genocide Convention has become a vital legal tool in the international campaign against impunity. Its provisions, including its enigmatic definition of the crime and its pledge both to punish and prevent the 'crime of crimes', have now been interpreted in important judgments by the International Court of Justice, the ad hoc Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda and various domestic courts. The second edition of this definitive work focuses on the judicial interpretation of the Convention, relying on debates in the International Law Commission, political statements in bodies like the General Assembly of the United Nations and the growing body of case law. Attention is given to the concept of protected groups, to problems of criminal prosecution and to issues of international judicial cooperation, such as extradition. The duty to prevent genocide and its relationship with the emerging doctrine of the 'responsibility to protect' are also explored.

Genocide the Bible and Biblical Scholarship

A range of scholars have concluded that genocide itself is disturbingly rational and is grounded in more than atavistic, ancient prejudice.

Genocide  the Bible and Biblical Scholarship

A range of scholars have concluded that genocide itself is disturbingly rational and is grounded in more than atavistic, ancient prejudice. This significant conclusion challenges biblical scholars to re-examine the historical, hermeneutical and theological problems posed by biblical mass violence.

The Genocide Convention The Travaux Pr paratoires 2 vols

Then there was the problem of deciding who was liable: should none but Governments be held responsible for the crime of genocide, or executive agents as ...

The Genocide Convention  The Travaux Pr  paratoires  2 vols

This work gathers in a single publication the records of the meetings which, in the context of the post World War II United Nations, led to the adoption of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide.

The Genocide Convention 1948

The Genocide Convention 1948


Refugees in an Age of Genocide

This is a study of the history of global refugee movements over the 20th century, ranging from east European Jews fleeing Tsarist oppression at the turn of the century to asylum seekers from the former Zaire and Yugoslavia.

Refugees in an Age of Genocide

This is a study of the history of global refugee movements over the 20th century, ranging from east European Jews fleeing Tsarist oppression at the turn of the century to asylum seekers from the former Zaire and Yugoslavia. Recognizing that the problem of refugees is a universal one, the authors emphasize the human element which should be at the forefront of both the study of refugees and responses to them.

Genocide in the Age of the Nation State

In this book, Mark Levene sets out the conceptual issues in the study of genocide, addressing the fundamental problems of defining genocide and understanding what we mean by perpetrators and victims, before placing it in the co.

Genocide in the Age of the Nation State

How should we understand genocide in the modern world? As an aberration from the norms of a dominant liberal international society? Or rather as a guide to the very dysfunctional nature of the international system itself? "The Meaning of Genocide" is the first work of its nature to consider the phenomenon within a broad context of world historical development. In this book, Mark Levene sets out the conceptual issues in the study of genocide, addressing the fundamental problems of defining genocide and understanding what we mean by perpetrators and victims, before placing it in the co.