The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration

“Evaluating the Intellectual Work of Writing Program Administration.” WPA: Writing Program Administration 22.1–2 (Fall/Winter 1998): 85–104. http://wpacouncil.org/positions/intellectualwork.html. —. “Guidelines for Self-Study to Precede ...

The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration

Combining formal quantitative research with narrative-based scholarship, THE PROMISE AND PERILS OF WRITING PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION represents multiple voices from faculty balancing between the demands of teaching, writing, and administering writing programs in professional, ethical ways-often under circumstances that can be defined, at best, as difficult. In these pages, junior faculty tell their stories of triumph and trauma, while more firmly established composition scholars reflect upon the changing and challenging profession we all share.

The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration

Combining formal quantitative research with narrative-based scholarship, THE PROMISE AND PERILS OF WRITING PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION represents multiple voices from faculty balancing between the demands of teaching, writing, and administering ...

The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration

Combining formal quantitative research with narrative-based scholarship, THE PROMISE AND PERILS OF WRITING PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION represents multiple voices from faculty balancing between the demands of teaching, writing, and administering writing programs in professional, ethical ways-often under circumstances that can be defined, at best, as difficult. In these pages, junior faculty tell their stories of triumph and trauma, while more firmly established composition scholars reflect upon the changing and challenging profession we all share. CONTRIBUTORS Chris Anson, Shane Borrowman, Stuart C. Brown, Nita Danko, Suellynn Duffey, Ernest J. Enchelmayer, Theresa Enos, Megan Fulwiler, Ann E. Green, Jeanne Gunner, Douglas Hesse, Elizabeth Hodges, Lauren Sewell Ingraham, Emily Isaacs, Patti J. Kurtz, Claire C. Lamonica, Camille Langston, Andrea A. Lunsford, Randall McClure, Susan H. McLeod, Richard McNabb, Thomas P. Miller, Cynthia Nearman, Erin O'Neill, Melissa Nicolas, Christine Norris, Chere L. Peguesse, Louise Wetherbee Phelps, E. Shelley Reid, Stephanie Roach, Duane Roen, Shirley K Rose, David Schwalm, Jillian Skeffington, Matt Smith, Martha A. Townsend, John Trimbur, Victor Villanueva, Margaret E. Weaver, Edward M. White, Kathleen Blake Yancey, and Art Young. ABOUT THE EDITORS THERESA ENOS is Professor of English at the University of Arizona, the founder and editor of Rhetoric Review, and a past president of the Council of Writing Program Administrators. She has edited or coedited twelve books, including the Encyclopedia of Rhetoric and Composition and The Writing Program Administrator's Resource: A Guide to Reflective Institutional Practice. SHANE BORROWMAN is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Nevada, Reno, a former writing program administrator, and the author of articles appearing in Rhetoric Review, College English, and WPA: Writing Program Administration. JILLIAN SKEFFINGTON is a PhD candidate at the University of Arizona.

Defining Locating and Addressing Bullying in the WPA Workplace

In The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration, ed. Theresa Enos and Shane Borrowman, 225–37. West Lafayette, IN: Parlor. Hoel, Helge, Ståle Einarsen, and Cary L. Cooper. 2003. “Organisational Effects of Bullying.

Defining  Locating  and Addressing Bullying in the WPA Workplace

Defining, Locating, and Addressing Bullying in the WPA Workplace is the first volume to take up the issue of bullying in writing programs. Contributors to this collection share their personal stories and analyze varieties of collegial malevolence they have experienced as WPAs with consequences in emotional, mental, and physical health and in personal and institutional economies. Contributors of varying status in different types of programs across many kinds of institutions describe various forms of bullying, including microaggressions, incivility, mobbing, and emotional abuse. They define bullying as institutional racism, “academic systemic incivility,” a crisis of insularity, and faculty fundamentalism. They locate bullying in institutional contexts, including research institutions, small liberal arts colleges, community colleges, and writing programs and writing centers. These locations are used as points of departure to further theorize bullying and to provide clear advice about agentive responses. A culture of silence discourages discussions of this behavior, making it difficult to address abuse. This silence also normalizes patterns and cultivates the perception that bullying arises naturally. Defining, Locating, and Addressing Bullying in the WPA Workplace helps the field to name these patterns of behaviors as bullying and resist ideologies of normalcy, encouraging and empowering readers to take an active role in defining, locating, and addressing bullying in their own workplaces. Contributors: Sarah Allen, Andrea Dardello, Harry Denny, Dawn Fels, Bre Garrett, W. Gary Griswold, Amy C. Heckathorn, Aurora Matzke, Staci Perryman-Clark, Sherry Rankins-Robertson, Erec Smith

WPAs in Transition

WPA: Writing Program Administration 39 (2): 16–20. Enchelmayer, Ernest J. 2008. “Sharing WPA Perils as Pearls of Wisdom.” In The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration, edited by Theresa Enos and Shane Borrowman, 49–57.

WPAs in Transition

WPAs in Transition shares a wide variety of professional and personal perspectives about the costs, benefits, struggles, and triumphs experienced by writing program administrators making transitions into and out of leadership positions. Contributors to the volume come from various positions, as writing center directors, assistant writing program administrators, and WPAs; mixed settings, including community colleges, small liberal arts colleges, and research institutions; and a range of career stages, from early to retiring. They recount insightful anecdotes and provide a scholarly context in which WPAs can share experiences related to this long-ignored aspect of their work. During such transitions, WPAs and other leaders who function as both administrators and faculty face the professional and personal challenges of redefining who they are, the work they do, and with whom they collaborate. WPAs in Transition creates a grounded and nuanced experiential understanding of what it means to navigate changing roles, advancing the dialogue around WPAs’ and other administrators’ identities, career paths, work-life balance, and location, and is a meaningful addition to the broader literature on administration and leadership. Contributors: Mark Blaauw-Hara, Christopher Blankenship, Jennifer Riley Campbell, Nicole I. Caswell, Richard Colby, Steven J. Corbett, Beth Daniell, Laura J. Davies, Jaquelyn Davis, Holland Enke, Letizia Guglielmo, Beth Huber, Karen Keaton Jackson, Rebecca Jackson, Tereza Joy Kramer, Jackie Grutsch McKinney, Kerri K. Morris, Liliana M. Naydan, Reyna Olegario, Kate Pantelides, Talinn Phillips, Andrea Scott, Paul Shovlin, Bradley Smith, Cheri Lemieux Spiegel, Sarah Stanley, Amy Rupiper Taggart, Molly Tetreault, Megan L. Titus, Chris Warnick

GenAdmin

Lamonica, Claire C. “Neither Fish Nor Fowl: The Promise and Peril of Directing a Program on an Administrative Line.” The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration. Ed. Theresa Enos and Shane Borrowman.

GenAdmin

GenAdmin: Theorizing WPA Identities in the Twenty-First Century examines identity formation in a generation of rhetoric and composition professionals who have undergone explicit preparation in scholarly dimensions of writing program administration. The authors argue for “GenAdmin” both as an intellectual identity and as a contingent philosophy of writing program work. GenAdmin alternates between traditional chapters and accompanying “Interludes,” each of which offers extended illuminations of the single conflict or theoretical question integral to the preceding chapter.

Writing Program Administration at Small Liberal Arts Colleges

Enos, Theresa, and Shane Borrowman. The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration. West Lafayette: Parlor P, 2008. Print. Faigley, Lester. “Writing Centers in Times of Whitewater.” Writing Center Journal 19.1 (1998): 7–18.

Writing Program Administration at Small Liberal Arts Colleges

WRITING PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION AT SMALL LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES presents an empirical study of the writing programs at one hundred small, private liberal arts colleges. Jill M. Gladstein and Dara Rossman Regaignon provide detailed information about a type of writing program not often highlighted in the scholarly record and offer a model for such national, multi-institutional research.

The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration

Combining formal quantitative research with narrative-based scholarship, THE PROMISE AND PERILS OF WRITING PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION represents multiple voices from faculty balancing between the demands of teaching, writing, and administering ...

The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration

Combining formal quantitative research with narrative-based scholarship, THE PROMISE AND PERILS OF WRITING PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION represents multiple voices from faculty balancing between the demands of teaching, writing, and administering writing programs in professional, ethical ways-often under circumstances that can be defined, at best, as difficult. In these pages, junior faculty tell their stories of triumph and trauma, while more firmly established composition scholars reflect upon the changing and challenging profession we all share.

A Rhetoric for Writing Program Administrators 2e

... more recently, Untenured Faculty as Writing Program Administrators (Dew and Horning) and The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration (Enos and Borrowman)— we find they too offer little systematic or procedural insight ...

A Rhetoric for Writing Program Administrators 2e

A Rhetoric for Writing Program Administrators (2nd Edition) presents the major issues and questions in the field of writing program administration. The collection provides aspiring, new, and seasoned WPAs with the theoretical lenses, terminologies, historical contexts, and research they need to understand the nature, history, and complexities of their intellectual and administrative work.

How Writing Faculty Write

“Living in the Spaces Between: Profiling the Writing Program Administrator.” In The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration, ed. Theresa Enos and Shane Borrowman, 5–20. West Lafayette: Parlor Press. Smith, Matt. 2008.

How Writing Faculty Write

In How Writing Faculty Write, Christine Tulley examines the composing processes of fifteen faculty leaders in the field of rhetoric and writing, revealing through in-depth interviews how each scholar develops ideas, conducts research, drafts and revises a manuscript, and pursues publication. The book shows how productive writing faculty draw on their disciplinary knowledge to adopt attitudes and strategies that not only increase their chances of successful publication but also cultivate writing habits that sustain them over the course of their academic careers. The diverse interviews present opportunities for students and teachers to extrapolate from the personal experience of established scholars to their own writing and professional lives. Tulley illuminates a long-unstudied corner of the discipline: the writing habits of theorists, researchers, and teachers of writing. Her interviewees speak candidly about overcoming difficulties in their writing processes on a daily basis, using strategies for getting started and restarted, avoiding writer’s block, finding and using small moments of time, and connecting their writing processes to their teaching. How Writing Faculty Write will be of significant interest to students and scholars across the spectrum—graduate students entering the discipline, new faculty and novice scholars thinking about their writing lives, mid-level and senior faculty curious about how scholars research and write, historians of rhetoric and composition, and metadisciplinary scholars.

Ecologies of Writing Programs

The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration. West Lafayette: Parlor P, 2008. Print. Gladstein, Jill M., and Dara Rossman Regaignon, eds. Writing Program Administration at Small Liberal Arts Colleges. Anderson, SC: Parlor P, ...

Ecologies of Writing Programs

Ecologies of Writing Programs: Profiles of Writing Programs in Context features profiles of exemplary and innovative writing programs across varied institutions. Situated within an ecological framework, the book explores the dynamic inter-relationships as well as the complex rhetorical and material conditions that writing programs inhabit—conditions and relationships that are constantly in flux as writing program administrators negotiate constraint and innovation.

Labored

The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration. Parlor Press, 2008. Evaluating the Intellectual Work of Writing Program Administrators. Council of Writing Program Administrators, wpacouncil.org/positions/intellectualwork.html.

Labored

Labored: The State(ment) and Future of Work in Composition, edited by Randall McClure, Dayna V. Goldstein, and Michael Pemberton, offers both a retrospective and a prospective look at the 1989 Statement of Principles and Standards for the Postsecondary Teaching of Writing and its relation to the changing nature of work in composition. Stemming from an investigative project to strengthen the Statement with data culled from national reports on labor conditions, this collection draws on the expertise of scholars whose research agendas and lived experiences afford fresh insights and critical analyses on labor issues in composition and writing program administration.

Untenured Faculty as Writing Program Administrators

Her most recent book chapter is “Understanding Ourselves, Our Work, and Our Working Conditions” in e Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration, also published by Parlor Press. Jo Ann Vogt has joined the sta of the Campus ...

Untenured Faculty as Writing Program Administrators

Contributors examine the politics of untenured writing program administrator appointments given the demands of writing program administration, and reconciles the tension between WPA position statements and current institutional practice.

The Things We Carry

Strategies for Recognizing and Negotiating Emotional Labor in Writing Program Administration Courtney Adams Wooten, Jacob Babb, Kristi Murray Costello, Kate Navickas ... The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration.

The Things We Carry

Emotional labor is not adequately talked about or addressed by writing program administrators. The Things We Carry makes this often-invisible labor visible, demonstrates a variety of practical strategies to navigate it reflectively, and opens a path for further research. Particularly timely, this collection considers how writing program administrators work when their schools or regions experience crisis situations. The book is broken into three sections: one emphasizing the WPA’s own work identity, one on fostering community in writing programs, and one on balancing the professional and personal. Chapters written by a diverse range of authors in different institutional and WPA contexts examine the roles of WPAs in traumatic events, such as mass shootings and natural disasters, as well as the emotional labor WPAs perform on a daily basis, such as working with students who have been sexually assaulted or endured racist, sexist, homophobic, and otherwise disenfranchising interactions on campus. The central thread in this collection focuses on “preserving” by acknowledging that emotions are neither good nor bad and that they must be continually reflected upon as WPAs consider what to do with emotional labor and how to respond. Ultimately, this book argues for more visibility of the emotional labor WPAs perform and for WPAs to care for themselves even as they care for others. The Things We Carry extends conversations about WPA emotional labor and offers concrete and useful strategies for administrators working in both a large range of traumatic events as well as daily situations that require tactical work to preserve their sense of self and balance. It will be invaluable to writing program administrators specifically and of interest to other types of administrators as well as scholars in rhetoric and composition who are interested in emotion more broadly.

Sharing Our Intellectual Traces

Narrative Reflections from Administrators of Professional, Technical, and Scientific Programs Tracy Bridgeford, Karla Saari Kitalong, Bill Williamson ... The promise and perils of writing program administration.

Sharing Our Intellectual Traces

Administrators of academic professional and technical communication (PTSC) programs have long relied upon lore--stories of what works--to understand and communicate about the work of program administration. Stories are interesting, telling, engaging, and necessary. But a discipline focused primarily on stories, especially the ephemeral stories narrated at conferences and deliberated at department meetings, usually suffice primarily to solve immediate problems and address day-to-day concerns and activities. This edited collection captures some of those stories and layers them with theoretical perspectives and reflection, to enhance their usefulness to the PTSC program administration community at large. Like the ephemeral stories PTSC program administrators are accustomed to, the stories told in this volume are set within specific institutional contexts that reflect specific institutional challenges. They emphasize the intellectual traces--the debts the authors owe to those who have informed and transformed their administrative work. In so doing, this collection creates another conversation--albeit a robust, diverse, and theoretically informed one--around which program leaders might define or redefine their roles and re-envision their administrative work as the rich, complex, intellectual engagement that we find it to be. This volume asks authors to move beyond a notion of administration as an activity based solely in institutional details and processes. In so doing, they emphasize theory as they share their reflections on core administrative processes and significant moments in the histories of their associated programs, thereby affording opportunities for critical examination in conjunction with practical advice.

Writing a Progressive Past

... and Wendy Sharer (2008) The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration, edited by Theresa Enos and Shane Borrowman (2008) Untenured Faculty as Writing Program Administrators: Institutional Practices and Politics, ...

Writing a Progressive Past

Writing a Progressive Past: Women Teaching and Writing in the Progressive Era traces the lineage of writing instruction during the Progressive Era, from the influences of John Dewey, to the graduate program designed and run by Fred Newton Scott. Finally, it explores two sites of writing instruction run by Scott’s graduates: one at Wellesley College and one at Mount Holyoke College.

Writers Without Borders

Other Books in the Series 1977: A Cultural Moment in Composition, by Brent Henze, Jack Selzer, and Wendy Sharer (2008) The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration, edited by Theresa Enos and Shane Borrowman (2008) Untenured ...

Writers Without Borders

In Writers Without Borders: Writing and Teaching Writing in Troubled Times, Lynn Z. Bloom presents groundbreaking research on the nature of essays and on the political, philosophical, ethical, and pragmatic considerations that influence how we read, write, and teach them in times troubled by terrorism, transgressive students, and uses and abuses of the Internet. Writers Without Borders reinforces Bloom’s reputation for presenting innovative and sophisticated research with a writer’s art and a teacher’s heart. Each of the eleven essays addresses in its own way the essay itself as one way to live and learn with others.

Women s Ways of Making

In Performing Feminism and Administration in Rhetoric and Composition Studies, edited by Krista Ratcliffe and Rebecca ... In The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration, edited by Theresa Enos and Shane Borrowman, 5–20.

Women   s Ways of Making

Women’s Ways of Making draws attention to material practices—those that the hands perform—as three epistemologies—an episteme, a techne, and a phronesis—that together give pointed consideration to making as a rhetorical embodied endeavor. Combined, these epistemologies show that making is a form of knowing that (episteme), knowing how (techne), and wisdom-making (phronesis). Since the Enlightenment, embodied knowledge creation has been overlooked, ignored, or disparaged as inferior to other forms of expression or thinking that seem to leave the material world behind. Privileging the hand over the eye, as the work in this collection does, thus problematizes the way in which the eye has been co-opted by thinkers as the mind’s tool of investigation. Contributors to this volume argue that other senses—touch, taste, smell, hearing—are keys to knowing one’s materials. Only when all these ways of knowing are engaged can making be understood as a rhetorical practice. In Women’s Ways of Making contributors explore ideas of making that run the gamut from videos produced by beauty vloggers to zine production and art programs at women’s correctional facilities. Bringing together senior scholars, new voices, and a fresh take on material rhetoric, this book will be of interest to a broad range of readers in composition and rhetoric. Contributors: Angela Clark-Oates, Jane L. Donawerth, Amanda Ellis, Theresa M. Evans, Holly Fulton-Babicke, Bre Garrett, Melissa Greene, Magdelyn Hammong Helwig, Linda Hanson, Jackie Hoermann, Christine Martorana, Aurora Matzke, Jill McCracken, Karen S. Neubauer, Daneryl Nier-Weber, Sherry Rankins-Roberson, Kathleen J. Ryan, Rachael Ryerson, Andrea Severson, Lorin Shellenberger, Carey Smitherman-Clark, Emily Standridge, Charlese Trower, Christy I. Wenger, Hui Wu, Kathleen Blake Yancey

Creole Composition

... 2008) Writers Without Borders: Writing and Teaching in Troubled Times (Bloom, 2008) 1977: A Cultural Moment in Composition (Henze, Selzer, % Sharer, 2008) The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration (Enos & Borrowman, ...

Creole Composition

Creole Composition is a collection featuring essays by scholars and teachers-researchers working with students in/from the Anglophone Caribbean. Arising from a need to define what writing instruction in the Caribbean means, Creole Composition expands the existing body of research literature about the teaching of writing at the postsecondary level in the Caribbean region. To this end, it speaks to critical disciplinary conversations of rhetoric and composition and academic literacies while addressing specific issues with teaching academic writing to Anglophone Caribbean students. It features chapters addressing language, approaches to teaching, assessing writing, administration, and research in postsecondary education as well as professionalization of writing instructors in the region. Some chapters reflect traditional Caribbean attitudes to postsecondary writing instruction; other chapters seek to reform these traditional practices. Some chapters’ interventions emerge from discussions in writing studies while other chapters reflect their authors’ primary training in other fields, such as applied linguistics, education, and literary studies. Additionally, the chapters use a variety of styles and methods, ranging from highly personal reflective essays to theoretical pieces and empirical studies following IMRaD format. Creole Composition, the first of its kind in the region, provides much-needed knowledge to the community of teacher-researchers in the Anglophone Caribbean and elsewhere in the fields of rhetoric and composition, writing studies, and academic literacies. In suggesting frameworks around which to build and further institutionalize and professionalize writing studies in the region, the collection advances the broader field of writing studies beyond national boundaries. Contributors include Tyrone Ali, Annife Campbell, Tresecka Campbell-Dawes, Valerie Combie, Jacob Dyer Spiegel, Brianne Jaquette, Carmeneta Jones, Clover Jones McKenzie, Beverley Josephs, Christine E. Kozikowski, Vivette Milson-Whyte, Kendra L. Mitchell, Raymond Oenbring, Heather M. Robinson, Daidrah Smith, and Michelle Stewart-McKoy.

First Year Composition

... Selzer, and Sharer, 2008) The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration (Enos and Borrowman, 2008) Untenured Faculty as Writing Program Administrators: Institutional Practices and Politics, (Dew and Horning, ...

First Year Composition

First-Year Composition: From Theory to Practice’s combination of theory and practice provides readers an opportunity to hear twelve of the leading theorists in composition studies answer, in their own voices, the key question of what it is they hope to accomplish in a first-year composition course. In addition, these chapters, and the accompanying syllabi, provide rich insights into the classroom practices of these theorists.

Expel the Pretender

... 2008) Writers Without Borders: Writing and Teaching in Troubled Times (Bloom, 2008) 1977: A Cultural Moment in Composition (Henze, Selzer, and Sharer, 2008) The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration (Enos and ...

Expel the Pretender

Political fights are not waged over who is speaking the truth but over whether any given claim seems to be authentic. Expel the Pretender: Rhetoric Renounced and the Politics of Style examines how rhetorical style influences judgments about how to communicate integrity and good will. Eve Wiederhold argues that attitudes about style’s significance to judgment are both undertheorized and over-determined, especially when style is regarded as an embellishment rather than as a constitutive aspect of language use. Examining news reports covering controversial speakers including President Bill Clinton, Linda Tripp, and the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, she demonstrates how rhetorical style is both belittled and yet remains a focal point for assessing public figures who have been publicly rebuked and discredited. Expel the Pretender claims style as a conflicted site of materiality, critiquing contemporary rhetorical theories that configure style as a dependable resource for democratic inquiry. Wiederhold argues that conceptions of style’s significance to judgment must be reframed to understand how we make decisions about who and what to believe.