Immigration and the Remaking of Black America

In response to this problem, the economist Kristin Butcher has suggested that U.S.-born blacks who have also made a migration decision—domestic interstate migrants (black American movers)—are a more appropriate comparison group for ...

Immigration and the Remaking of Black America

Over the last four decades, immigration from the Caribbean and sub-Saharan Africa to the U. S. has increased rapidly. In several states, African immigrants are now major drivers of growth in the black population. While social scientists and commentators have noted that these black immigrants’ social and economic outcomes often differ from those of their native-born counterparts, few studies have carefully analyzed the mechanisms that produce these disparities. In Immigration and the Remaking of Black America, sociologist and demographer Tod Hamilton shows how immigration is reshaping black America. He weaves together interdisciplinary scholarship with new data to enhance our understanding of the causes of socioeconomic stratification among both the native-born and newcomers. Hamilton demonstrates that immigration from the Caribbean and sub-Saharan Africa is driven by selective migration, meaning that newcomers from these countries tend to have higher educational attainment than those who stay behind. As a result, they arrive in the U.S. with some advantages over native-born blacks, and, in some cases, over whites. He also shows the importance of historical context: prior to the Civil Rights Movement, black immigrants’ socioeconomic outcomes resembled native-born blacks’ much more closely, regardless of their educational attainment in their country of origin. Today, however, certain groups of black immigrants have better outcomes than native-born black Americans—such as lower unemployment rates and higher rates of homeownership—in part because they immigrated at a time of expanding opportunities for minorities and women in general. Hamilton further finds that rates of marriage and labor force participation among native-born blacks that move away from their birth states resemble those of many black immigrants, suggesting that some disparities within the black population stem from processes associated with migration, rather than from nativity alone. Hamilton argues that failing to account for this diversity among the black population can lead to incorrect estimates of the social progress made by black Americans and the persistence of racism and discrimination. He calls for future research on racial inequality to disaggregate different black populations. By richly detailing the changing nature of black America, Immigration and the Remaking of Black America helps scholars and policymakers to better understand the complexity of racial disparities in the twenty-first century.

Remaking Black Power

By the early 1900s, laborers, grassroots activists, and political leaders alike glibly surmised that, for black Americans, the new century would look much like the last. The racist rituals that characterized the postslavery era would ...

Remaking Black Power

In this comprehensive history, Ashley D. Farmer examines black women's political, social, and cultural engagement with Black Power ideals and organizations. Complicating the assumption that sexism relegated black women to the margins of the movement, Farmer demonstrates how female activists fought for more inclusive understandings of Black Power and social justice by developing new ideas about black womanhood. This compelling book shows how the new tropes of womanhood that they created--the "Militant Black Domestic," the "Revolutionary Black Woman," and the "Third World Woman," for instance--spurred debate among activists over the importance of women and gender to Black Power organizing, causing many of the era's organizations and leaders to critique patriarchy and support gender equality. Making use of a vast and untapped array of black women's artwork, political cartoons, manifestos, and political essays that they produced as members of groups such as the Black Panther Party and the Congress of African People, Farmer reveals how black women activists reimagined black womanhood, challenged sexism, and redefined the meaning of race, gender, and identity in American life.

The Geography of Malcolm X

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Geography of Malcolm X

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Remaking America

Perhaps in no other American city did race relations present as complex and as varied a pattern as in New Orleans. Clearly, no city presented as bold and as imaginative a portrait of black idealism and generosity.

Remaking America

Uncovers the long history and rich traditions of giving among people of color. Focusing on four communities--Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos--Joseph draws compelling portraits of cultural heroes and heroines who personify the benevolent nature of their unique heritages. The author maintains that by understanding and affirming these traditions, we can form a new vision of the larger American community based on shared values, universal compassion, and a new spirituality.

Remaking Home Economics

Nationwide, in 2007 African Americans were 5.2 percent of full-time faculty members at colleges and universities (“Black Faculty in Higher Education” 2007). However, few of the top-ranked private and state colleges and universities ...

Remaking Home Economics

These new essays, relevant for a variety of fields--history, women's studies, STEM, and family and consumer sciences itself--take current and historical perspectives on home economics philosophy, social responsibility, and public outreach; food and clothing; gender and race in career settings; and challenges to the field's identity and continuity.

American Socialism and Black Americans

Special features of the book include: Exercises to test and challenge the reader′s understanding Direct comparison between constellations and other positioning systems Mathematical content kept to a minimum in order to maximize ...

American Socialism and Black Americans


Remaking the Republic

"This is a book in African American history.

Remaking the Republic

"This is a book in African American history. It is about African Americans' efforts to define citizenship in the nineteenth-century United States. The definition of citizenship in the Constitution is vague, and African Americans used that ambiguity to claim specific rights, thereby crafting the definition of citizenship for all Americans"--

Dimensions of Black Conservatism in the United States

CONCLUSION: REMAKING AFRICAN AMERICAN PUBLIC OPINION: SOME TESTABLE PROPOSITIONS At this point in the study, the logical, historical, observational, contextual, and statistical evidence lends support to an evidential base interpretation ...

Dimensions of Black Conservatism in the United States

Dimensions of Black Conservatism in the US is a collection of twelve essays by leading black intellectuals and scholars on varied dimensions of black conservative thought and activism. The book explores the political role and functions of black neoconservatives. The majority of essays cover the contemporary period. The authors have provided a historical context for the reader with several articles examining the origins and development of black conservatism.

Missouri s Black Heritage

Because Missouri's Black Heritage, Revised Edition places Missouri's experience in the larger context of the national experience, this book will bewelcomed by all students and teachers of American history or black studies, as well as by the ...

Missouri s Black Heritage

Originally written in 1980 by the late Lorenzo J. Greene, Gary R. Kremer, and Antonio F. Holland, Missouri's Black Heritage remains the only book-length account of the rich and inspiring history of the state's African-American population. It has now been revised and updated by Kremer and Holland, incorporating the latest scholarship into its pages. This edition describes in detail the struggles faced by many courageous African-Americans in their efforts to achieve full civil and political rights against the greatest of odds. Documenting the African-American experience from the horrors of slavery through present-day victories, the book touches on the lives of people such as John Berry Meachum, a St. Louis slave who purchased his own freedom and then helped countless other slaves gain emancipation; Hiram Young, a Jackson County free black whose manufacturing of wagons for Santa Fe Trail travelers made him a legendary figure; James Milton Turner; who, after rising from slavery to become one of the best-educated blacks in Missouri, worked with the Freedmen's Bureau and the State Department of Education to establish schools for blacks all over the state after the Civil War; and Annie Turnbo Malone, a St. Louis entrepreneur whose business skills made her one of the state's wealthiest African-Americans in the early twentieth century. A personal reminiscence by the late Lorenzo J. Greene, a distinguished African-American historian whom many regard as one of the fathers of black history, offers a unique view of Missouri's racial history and heritage. Because Missouri's Black Heritage, Revised Edition places Missouri's experience in the larger context of the national experience, this book will bewelcomed by all students and teachers of American history or black studies, as well as by the general reader. It will also promote pride and a greater understanding among African-Americans about their past and provide an increased appreciation of the contributions and hardships of blacks.

Race Class and Culture

This book examines the sources and dynamics of the race cleavage in American society through a detailed analysis of intergroup and intragroup differences at the level of mass opinion.

Race  Class  and Culture

Race is arguably the most profound and enduring cleavage in American society and politics. This book examines the sources and dynamics of the race cleavage in American society through a detailed analysis of intergroup and intragroup differences at the level of mass opinion. The ethclass theory, which examines the intersection of ethnicity and class, is used to analyze interracial differences in mass attitudes. This analysis yields three clusters of opinion that distinguish African Americans from whites -- religiosity, interpersonal alienation, and political liberalism. The authors then examine the intragroup sources of these opinion differences among blacks in terms of class, gender, age, region, and religion. While the authors demonstrate an embryonic trend of more black middle class opinion agreement with whites, the book confirms the ethclass character of the black experience whereby race and race consciousness are still more significant than class in shaping black attitudes. Given the growing class bifurcation in black America and the continuing debate about its significance in shaping black attitudes and behavior, this book offers a refreshing new analysis of the homogeneity as well as heterogeneity of black mass public opinion.

Oppression

Oppression


Picture Freedom

"Picture Freedom provides a unique and nuanced interpretation of nineteenth-century African American life and culture.

Picture Freedom

"Picture Freedom provides a unique and nuanced interpretation of nineteenth-century African American life and culture. Focusing on visuality, print culture, and an examination of the parlor, Cobb has fashioned a book like none other, convincingly demonstrating how whites and blacks reimagined racial identity and belonging in the early republic."--Erica Armstrong Dunbar, author of A Fragile Freedom: African American Women and Emancipation in the Antebellum City.

To Wake the Nations

This powerful book argues that white culture in America does not exist apart from black culture.

To Wake the Nations

This powerful book argues that white culture in America does not exist apart from black culture. The hallmark of this volume is a sweeping reevaluation of the glory years of American literature--from 1830 to 1930--that shows how white literature and black literature form a single interwoven tradition. (Harvard Univ. Press)February

Latinos

"Latinos brings together the most sophisticated thinking on the changing intellectual complexion of America."--Henry Louis Gates, Jr., author of Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Black Man

Latinos

"Latinos brings together the most sophisticated thinking on the changing intellectual complexion of America."--Henry Louis Gates, Jr., author of Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Black Man

Daily Life of U S Soldiers From the American Revolution to the Iraq War 3 volumes

Jennifer D. Keene, The Doughboys, the Great War and the Remaking of America (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins, 2001), 177. 79. ... Barbeau, Arthur F. and Florette Henri, The Unknown Soldiers: Black American Troops in World War I.

Daily Life of U S  Soldiers  From the American Revolution to the Iraq War  3 volumes

This ground-breaking work explores the lives of average soldiers from the American Revolution through the 21st-century conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. • Provides readers with an understanding of the daily lives of soldiers in America's wars, greatly complementing more standard histories of battles and leaders • Offers a curated collection of primary sources for each conflict that illuminates the daily lives of US soldiers during wartime • Includes detailed bibliographies that offer many accessible sources needed by students and researchers looking to further explore the topics • Provides a comprehensive chronology for each conflict that helps readers to place it within the proper historical context • Spans nearly 250 years of national history from the American Revolution to the Afghanistan War

Black Music White Business

Probes the principal contradiction in the jazz world: that between black artistry on the one hand and white ownership of the means of jazz distribution -- the recording companies, booking agencies, festivals, nightclubs, and magazines -- on ...

Black Music  White Business

Probes the principal contradiction in the jazz world: that between black artistry on the one hand and white ownership of the means of jazz distribution -- the recording companies, booking agencies, festivals, nightclubs, and magazines -- on the other.

Re Imagining Black Women

The Denzel Principle: Why Black Women Can't Find Good Black Men. ... The Neoliberal Deluge: Hurricane Katrina, Late Capitalism, and the Remaking of New Orleans. ... Shifting: The Double Lives of Black Women in America.

Re Imagining Black Women

A wide-ranging Black feminist interrogation, reaching from the #MeToo movement to the legacy of gender-based violence against Black women From Michelle Obama to Condoleezza Rice, Black women are uniquely scrutinized in the public eye. In Re-Imagining Black Women, Nikol G. Alexander-Floyd explores how Black women—and Blackness more broadly—are understood in our political imagination and often become the subjects of public controversy. Drawing on politics, popular culture, psychoanalysis, and more, Alexander-Floyd examines our conflicting ideas, opinions, and narratives about Black women, showing how they are equally revered and reviled as an embodiment of good and evil, cast either as victims or villains, citizens or outsiders. Ultimately, Alexander-Floyd showcases the complex experiences of Black women as political subjects. At a time of extreme racial tension, Re-Imagining Black Women provides insight into the parts that Black women play, and are expected to play, in politics and popular culture.

Buy Black

How Black Women Transformed US Pop Culture Aria S. Halliday. Boyd, Henry Allen. ... Brock, André L. Distributed Blackness: African American Cybercultures. ... Picture Freedom: Remaking Black Visuality in the Early Nineteenth Century.

Buy Black

Buy Black examines the role American Black women play in Black consumption in the US and worldwide, with a focus on their pivotal role in packaging Black feminine identity since the 1960s. Through an exploration of the dolls, princesses, and rags-to-riches stories that represent Black girlhood and womanhood in everything from haircare to Nicki Minaj’s hip-hop, Aria S. Halliday spotlights how the products created by Black women have furthered Black women’s position as the moral compass and arbiter of Black racial progress. Far-ranging and bold, Buy Black reveals what attitudes inform a contemporary Black sensibility based in representation and consumerism. It also traces the parameters of Black symbolic power, mapping the sites where intraracial ideals of blackness, womanhood, beauty, play, and sexuality meet and mix in consumer and popular culture.

Black Women in America

Living In , Living Out : African American Domestics and the Great Migration . ... Wolcott , Victoria W. Remaking Respectability : African American Women in Interwar Detroit . Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press , 2001 .

Black Women in America

Provides biographies and topical essays discussing the important roles Black women have played in American history.