The Real Chekhov

An Introduction to Chekhov's Last Plays David Magarshack. Konstantin is convinced that his play will revolutionise the art of the theatre: The curtain, the first wing, the second and beyond that open space. No scenery.

The Real Chekhov

What is Chekhov’s method of ensuring audience participation? What does his stage direction ‘through tears’ mean? What happens between the first and second acts of The Seagull? Is there any reason for the despondency in Chekhov’s drama? This book, first published in 1972, discusses these questions and many other issues around Chekhov’s last four plays. David Magarshack, the leading translator and biography of many of Russia’s greatest writers, closely examines Chekhov’s work for the relevant facts about his writing, and demonstrates that no reliance should be placed on the so-called subtext which can introduce all sorts of irrelevancies arising from pre-conceived ideas about the plays. A careful reading of Chekhov’s text itself is all that is needed to correct the familiar distortions of his characters and themes.

Chekhov s Letters

As Chekhov wrote his “literary” work—that is, his letter—actual, specific people arrived, separating what we could call the “letterary” (epistolary) world from the real world. The epistolary “action” ends, and the real action begins: ...

Chekhov s Letters

This collection examines the letters of Anton Chekhov, which have received relatively little scholarly attention. The contributors approach the letters from a variety of angles—biography, psychology, literary criticism, poetics, and history—to characterize Chekhov’s key epistolary concerns and to examine their role in his life.

A Study Guide for Anton Chekhov s Seagull

The Real Chekhov: An Introduction to Chekhov's Last Plays, Allen & Unwin, Styan, J. L., Chekhov in Performance: A Commentary on the Major Plays, Cambridge University Press, 1971. Styan also provides a close analysis of Chekhov's four ...

A Study Guide for Anton Chekhov s  Seagull

A Study Guide for Anton Chekhov's "Seagull," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Drama For Students. This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Drama For Students for all of your research needs.

Chekhov s Plays

... that is , not make conjectures or search for Him in Dostoevsky , but perceive Him as clearly as they perceive that two times two is four . " 15 The real God would be obscured for a while . Chekhov doesn't say anything directly about ...

Chekhov s Plays

Eminent critic Richard Gilman examines each of Chekhov's full-length plays, showing how they relate to each other, to Chekhov's short stories, and to his life. Gilman places the plays in the context of Russian and European drama and the larger culture of the period, and the reasons behind the enduring power of these classic works.

Anton Chekhov

Again , the characters bear the names of real people : the artist Chekhov , Maria Egorovna ( presumably Polevaeva ) , while the narrator , unnamed , resembles Anton , for he teaches the heroine's daughter German and goldfinch trapping .

Anton Chekhov

Anton Chekhov's life was short, intense, and dominated by battles, both with his dependents and with the tuberculosis that killed him at age forty-four. The traditional image of Chekhov is that of the restrained artist torn between medicine and literature. But Donald Rayfield's biography reveals the life long hidden behind the noble facade. Here is a man capable of both great generosity toward needy peasants and harsh callousness toward lovers and family, a man who craved with equal passion the company of others and the solitude necessary to create his art. Based on information from Chekhov archives throughout Russia, Rayfield's work has been hailed as a groundbreaking examination of the life of a literary master.A new biography of the great author and playwright.

Chekhov s Journey

But here's the real nightmare: supposing this trek into the wilderness was a novel in its own right? ... I'm sure we haven't any real hope of solving the mystery awaiting us. ... 'A real change of pace for Mr Chekhov: Bravo!

Chekhov s Journey

In 1890 the Russian author Chekhov undertook an historic journey across Siberia to the convict island of Sakhalin. A hundred years later, in an isolated artist's retreat, a Soviet film unit prepares to commemorate his journey by using a technique that will cause their chosen actor to not only play the role of the playwright, but to believe that he is Chekhov. But the situations Mikhail acts out diverge wildly from known biographical facts when Chekhov hears of an explosion in the Tunguska region of Siberia. Yet the real Tunguska explosion occurred in 1908 - so how could Chekhov have possible heard of it in 1890?

Brecht in L A

Chekhov believes that the director and actor should avoid overemphasizing illusionism. Meyerhold, who originated the ... 'It's real', repeated Chekhov laughing, and after a pause said: 'The stage is art. Kramskoy has a genre painting ...

Brecht in L A

"Bertolt Brecht is perhaps the most important dramatist/director/theorist of the twentieth century. He is widely studied and his plays and theories remain staples in the curricula of university theatre departments, literature departments, and theatre-artist training programs throughout the world. The play Brecht in L.A. focuses on Brecht's life in America, where he resided from 1941 to 1947." "Brecht in L.A., winner of the 2002 SWTA National New Play Contest (U.S.) is already a critically acclaimed play. Centering on Brecht while adapting and critiquing Brechtian dramatic form, the play provides a unique opportunity for the instructor who is teaching Brechtian theatre since - with just one text (which includes an essay on Brechtian performance, endnotes and appendices) - the instructor can cover epic theatre, the "Brecht debate," Brecht's biography, and contradictions between Brecht's theatrical practices and his everyday life."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Reference Guide to Russian Literature

Chekhov in Performance : A Commentary on the Major Plays , by J.L. Styan , Cambridge , Cambridge University Press , 1971 . The Real Chekhov : An Introduction to Chekhov's Last Plays , by David Magarshack , London , Allen and Unwin ...

Reference Guide to Russian Literature

"First Published in 1998, Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company."

A Twentieth century Literature Reader

Indeed, though they are present here only figuratively, these birds later become real creatures (invisible from the stage, ... In nearly every example I can recall, the major images in Chekhov's work are natural images which are to some ...

A Twentieth century Literature Reader

This critical Reader is the essential companion to any course in twentieth-century literature. Drawing upon the work of a wide range of key writers and critics, the selected extracts provide: a literary-historical overview of the twentieth century insight into theoretical discussions around the purpose, value and form of literature which dominated the century closer examination of representative texts from the period, around which key critical issues might be debated. Clearly conveying the excitement generated by twentieth-century literary texts and by the provocative critical ideas and arguments that surrounded them, this reader can be used alongside the two volumes of Debating Twentieth-Century Literature or as a core text for any module on the literature of the last century. Texts examined in detail include: Chekhov's The Cherry Orchard, Mansfield's Short Stories, poetry of the 1930s, Gibbon's Sunset Song, Eliot's Prufrock, Brecht's Galileo, Woolf's Orlando, Okigbo's Selected Poems, du Maurier's Rebecca, poetry by Ginsburg and O'Hara, Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, Puig's Kiss of the Spiderwoman, Beckett's Waiting for Godot, Heaney's New Selected Poems 1966-1987, Gurnah's Paradise and Barker's The Ghost Road.

Ivanov

The real Chekhov wasa considerably more complex,testierand troubled humanbeing thanhis hagiographers make out.Indeed, tothattiresome school of academics who believe that literary criticism consists of marking offa writer's every line ...

Ivanov

This adaptation by David Hare premiered at the Almeida Theatre, London in 1997 starring Ralph Fiennes This is a drama of a Russian landowner's half-farcical, half serious personal crisis as he plummets fast into domestic and philosophical chaos. The central scene concerns a debate between the landowner and the young doctor about honesty. The latter thinks that honesty is to do with blurting out offensive truths, whilst the former insists that no-one can acquire honesty unless they have the self knowledge to examine their own motives. By turns despairing and passionate, this play offers an insight into a robust young writer, exploring themes that were to interest him in his later plays.

Experimental

new life and new civilizations; to boldly go where no man has gone before”) meets its double in the real and ... Nostalgic for the wrecked ship that they once crewed, Commander Chekhov radios to Kirk: “Admiral, we have found the nuclear ...

Experimental

She shows how the Language poets, a group of primarily white experimental writers, restored to the canon what they saw as modernism's true legacy, whose stakes were simultaneously political and epistemological: it produced a poet who was an intellectual and a text that was experimental.

The Three Sisters

The play focuses on the lives of three sisters, Olga, Masha, and Irina, young women of the Russian gentry who try to fill their days in order to construct a life that feels meaningful while surrounded by an array of military men, servants, ...

The Three Sisters

This landmark probes the lives and dreams of Olga, Masha and Irina, former Muscovites now living in a provincial town from which they long to escape. Their hopes for a life more suited to their cultivated tastes and sensibilities provide a touching counterpoint to the relentless flow of compromising events in the real world.

Michael Chekhov s Acting Technique

Chekhov alleviates any doubts we may have about whether we are actually radiating by suggesting that 'if you sincerely and ... the imagination will gradually and faithfully lead you to the real and actual process of radiating' (TA, 12).

Michael Chekhov   s Acting Technique

Intended for actors, directors, teachers and researchers, this book offers an exceptionally clear and thorough introduction to the renowned acting technique developed by Michael Chekhov. Sinéad Rushe's book provides a complete overview of the whole method, and includes illuminating explanations of its principles, as well as a wide range of practical exercises that illustrate, step by step, how they can be applied to dramatic texts. Part One provides an outline of the ideas that underpin the work, which help to prepare practitioners to become responsive and receptive, and to awaken their imagination. Part Two charts a journey through the foundational psychophysical exercises that can both orient an actor's training routine and be applied directly to the development of a role. Part Three focuses on more specific and elaborate methods of scene work, characterisation and the art of transformation. Drawing on the full range of Chekhov's writing in English and French, this book also examines unpublished material from the Dartington Hall archives and features interviews with actors who have worked with the technique, including Simon Callow and Joanna Merlin. It illustrates Chekhov's approach by referring to Rushe's own productions of Nikolai Gogol's short story Diary of a Madman and Shakespeare's Othello, as well as characters and scenes in Sarah Kane's Blasted and the contemporary American television series Breaking Bad. Michael Chekhov's Acting Technique is an accessible, comprehensive and contemporary point of reference for those already trained in the method, as well as an initiation and toolkit for practitioners who are just beginning to discover it.

The Polemical Force of Chekhov s Comedies

( Chekhov to A.S. Suvorin , 7 May 1889 ) It's difficult to act in your play . There are no real living characters . " Nina's criticism of Konstantin's symbolist play may be a trifle unimaginative and insensitive but it is bluntly ...

The Polemical Force of Chekhov s Comedies

This work is a revisionist study of Anton Chekhov's drama which points out, for the first time, the rhetorical and polemical elements that have remained unnoticed or unmentioned in previous studies. This work will appeal to scholars interested in Chekhov's plays and the polemical force of drama. emasculate the polemical force Chekhovian comedy out of misplaced respect for his renowned objectivity and his loathing of overt moralizing. A rhetorical framework of analysis is predicated upon the assumption that all writings are implicated in 'interestedness' - the critic's task is to uncover the rhetorical parameters and nature of that 'interestedness.' Through analyses of each of Chekhov's plays in its original context, the author identifies the rhetorical potential that remains neglected in contemporary readings and productions. All of the readings in this study are addressed to actors and directors - inviting them to reassess and reclaim the force of these plays for our time.

Anton Chekhov

Chekhov's talent , they said , lay in dramatising the business of saying good - bye to friends in such a way that it ... In this respect he was a genuine ' auteur ' with an independent flexibility of mind which gave him fresh insights ...

Anton Chekhov

Anton Chekhov (1860-1904). Popular Russian dramatist and short-story writer. Writings include: The Seagull, The Cherry Orchard. Volume covers the period 1891-1945.

Longing

Lika Mizinova – the one true love of Chekhov's life? Chekhov married the actress Olga Knipper in 1901 when he had three years left to live. It was a union that dumbfounded and outraged most of his family – it seemed incomprehensible.

Longing

All things pass – is this your philosophy? Is there no room for love in your philosophy of life? Renowned and best-selling novelist William Boyd, CBE, adapts two Chekhov short stories, A Visit to Friends and My Life, to weave a comic tale about nineteenth-century Russian provincial life, both familiar and unfamiliar. When Kolia is invited to visit his oldest friends on their Estate in the country he anticipates a pleasant break from Moscow life. But as the comedy of provincial life plays out around him, he finds himself adrift in a miasma of false expectations, missed opportunities, and unspoken passions.

Literature of Pity

... it is the actual expression of feeling that precisely causes it to atrophy and wither: any feeling, however robust, cannot withstand the pressure of the real, even if the real in Chekhov is an atrophied, withered species in itself.

Literature of Pity

Pity represents a combination of fear, helplessness and overwhelming agitation. It is a term which suffuses our everyday lives; it is also a dangerous term hovering between approval of sympathy and disapproval of emotional wallowing (as in 'self-pity'). This book traces an entire history of pity, as an emotion and as an element in the arts, engaging as it does so with a wealth of theoretical ideas including Freud, Derrida, Levinas and others. It begins with an 'Introduction: Distinguishing Pity', followed by chapters on the Aristotelian framework; Buddhism and pity; the pieta in the Middle Ages and Renaissance; Shakespeare on pity; Milton's pitiless Christianity; pity and charity in the early novel; Blake's views on pity; the Victorian debate, from Austen to Dickens and George Eliot; Brecht and Chekhov on pity and self-pity; 'war, and the pity of war'; Jean Rhys and Stevie Smith; pity, immigration and the colony; and finally three contemporary texts by Michel Faber, Kazuo Ishiguro and Cormac McCarthy.Features* Original treatment of the concept of pity providing detailed textual criticism and speculative argument* Wide-ranging: running from ancient Greek theory to the present day* Covers a wide variety of texts, including fiction, poetry and drama* Engages with the most recent theoretical debates about literature and the emotions

Interpreting Chekhov

The depiction of 'life as it is' presented as realistically as possible was Chekhov's first artistic objective. ... For him human psychology could only be a real science when it was dealt with through an examination of the human ...

Interpreting Chekhov

The author's contention is that Chekhov's plays have often been misinterpreted by scholars and directors, particularly through their failure to adequately balance the comic and tragic elements inherent in these works. Through a close examination of the form and content of Chekhov's dramas, the author shows how deeply pessimistic or overly optimistic interpretations fail to sufficiently account for the rich complexity and ambiguity of these plays. The author suggests that, by accepting that Chekhov's plays are synthetic tragi-comedies which juxtapose potentially tragic sub-texts with essentially comic texts, critics and directors are more likely to produce richer and more deeply satisfying interpretations of these works. Besides being of general interest to any reader interested in understanding Chekhov's work, the book is intended to be of particular interest to students of Drama and Theatre Studies and to potential directors of these subtle plays.

Seeing Chekhov

Komnata Chekhov v Taganroge ( Moscow : V.V. Dumnov , 1924 ) , s . a 33. ... I have seen only three published photographs of Chekhov in his study . ... For instance , to Stanislavskii , regarding Hauptmann : “ He's a real dramatist .

Seeing Chekhov

Chekhov's keen powers of observation have been remarked by both memoirists who knew him well and scholars who approach him only through the written record and across the distance of many decades. To apprehend Chekhov means seeing how Chekhov sees, and the author's remarkable vision is understood as deriving from his occupational or professional training and identity. But we have failed to register, let alone understand, just what a central concern for Chekhov himself, and how deeply problematic, were precisely issues of seeing and being seen.--from the Introduction Michael C. Finke explodes a century of critical truisms concerning Chekhov's objective eye and what being a physician gave him as a writer in a book that foregrounds the deeply subjective and self-reflexive aspects of his fiction and drama. In exploring previously unrecognized seams between the author's life and his verbal art, Finke profoundly alters and deepens our understanding of Chekhov's personality and behaviors, provides startling new interpretations of a broad array of Chekhov's texts, and fleshes out Chekhov's simultaneous pride in his identity as a physician and devastating critique of turn-of-the-century medical practices and ideologies. Seeing Chekhov is essential reading for students of Russian literature, devotees of the short story and modern drama, and anyone interested in the intersection of literature, psychology, and medicine.

Oblomov

His last books to be published before his death were The Real Chekhov and a translation of Chekhov's Four Plays. is MILTON EHRE Professor Emeritus of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Oblomov

Ilya Ilyich Oblomov is a member of Russia's dying aristocracy - a man so lazy that he has given up his job in the Civil Service, neglected his books, insulted his friends and found himself in debt. Too apathetic to do anything about his problems, he lives in a grubby, crumbling apartment, waited on by Zakhar, his equally idle servant. Terrified by the bustle and activity necessary to participate in the real world, Oblomov manages to avoid work, postpone change and - finally - risks losing the love of his life. Written with sympathetic humour and compassion, Oblomov made Goncharov famous throughout Russia on its publication in 1859, as readers saw in this story of a man whose defining characteristic is indolence, the portrait of an entire class in decline.