The Red Parts

Autobiography of a Trial

The Red Parts

Selected as a Book of the Year 2017 in the Guardian 'Maggie Nelson’s short, singular books feel pretty light in the hand... But in the head and the heart, they seem unfathomably vast, their cleverness and odd beauty lingering on' Observer In 1969, Jane Mixer, a first-year law student at the University of Michigan, posted a note on a student noticeboard to share a lift back to her hometown of Muskegon for spring break. She never made it: she was brutally murdered, her body found a few miles from campus the following day. The Red Parts is Maggie Nelson’s singular account of her aunt Jane’s death, and the trial that took place some 35 years afterward. Officially unsolved for decades, the case was reopened in 2004 after a DNA match identified a new suspect, who would soon be arrested and tried. In 2005, Nelson found herself attending the trial, and reflecting with fresh urgency on our relentless obsession with violence, particularly against women. Resurrecting her interior world during the trial – in all its horror, grief, obsession, recklessness, scepticism and downright confusion – Maggie Nelson has produced a work of profound integrity and, in its subtle indeterminacy, deadly moral precision.

Proceedings of the 28th Conference of Spacecraft TT&C Technology in China

Openness, Integration and Intelligent Interconnection

Proceedings of the 28th Conference of Spacecraft TT&C Technology in China

This book collects selected papers from the 28th Conference of Spacecraft TT&C Technology in China held on November 8-10, 2016. The book features state-of-the-art studies on spacecraft TT&C in China with the theme of “Openness, Integration and Intelligent Interconnection”. To meet requirements of new space endeavors, development of spacecraft instrumentation systems have to follow an open concept and approach in China. An open spacecraft instrumentation system encompasses integrated development of different types of services, integration of disciplines and specialties, intelligent links, and more scientific and intelligent information interface technology. Researchers and engineers in the field of aerospace engineering and communication engineering can benefit from the book.

The Works of John Hunter, F.R.S.

The Works of John Hunter, F.R.S.

This five-volume collection of the writings of the distinguished surgeon and anatomist John Hunter was published between 1835 and 1837.

Red Parts

Red Parts

One day in March 1969, twenty-three- year-old Jane Mixer was on her way home to tell her parents she was getting married. She had arranged for a ride through the campus bulletin board at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, where she was one of a handful of pioneering women students at the law school. Her body was found the following morning just inside the gates of a small cemetery fourteen miles away, shot twice in the head and strangled. Six other young women were murdered around the same time, and it was assumed they had all been victims of alleged serial killer John Collins, who was convicted of one of these crimes not long after. Jane Mixer's death was long considered to be one of the infamous Michigan Murders, as they had come to be known. But officially, Jane's murder remained unsolved, and Maggie Nelson grew up haunted by the possibility that the killer of her mother's sister was still at large. In an instance of remarkable serendipity, more than three decades later, a 2004 DNA match led to the arrest of a new suspect for Jane's murder at precisely the same time that Nelson was set to publish a book of poetry about her aunt's life and death -- a book she had been working on for years, and which assumed her aunt's case to be closed forever. The Red Partschronicles the uncanny series of events that led to Nelson's interest in her aunt's death, the reopening of the case, the bizarre and brutal trial that ensued, and the effects these events had on the disparate group of people they brought together. ButThe Red Partsis much more than a "true crime" record of a murder, investigation, and trial. For into this story Nelson has woven a spare, poetic account of a girlhood and early adulthood haunted by loss, mortality, mystery, and betrayal, as well as a subtle but blistering look at the personal and political consequences of our cultural fixation on dead (white) women. The result is a stark, fiercely intelligent, and beautifully written memoir that poses vital questions about America's complex relationship to spectacles of violence and suffering, and that scrupulously explores the limits and possibilities of honesty, grief, empathy, and justice.