The Republican War on Science

This is not unique to the Bush administration, but it is largely a Republican phenomenon, born of a conservative dislike of environmental, health, and safety regulation, and at the extremes, of evolution and legalized abortion.

The Republican War on Science

Science has never been more crucial to deciding the political issues facing the country. Yet science and scientists have less influence with the federal government than at any time since the Eisenhower administration. In the White House and Congress today, findings are reported in a politicized manner; spun or distorted to fit the speaker's agenda; or, when they're too inconvenient, ignored entirely. On a broad array of issues-stem cell research, climate change, missile defense, abstinence education, product safety, environmental regulation, and many others-the Bush administration's positions fly in the face of overwhelming scientific consensus. Federal science agencies, once fiercely independent under both Republican and Democratic presidents, are increasingly staffed by political appointees and fringe theorists who know industry lobbyists and evangelical activists far better than they know the science. This is not unique to the Bush administration, but it is largely a Republican phenomenon, born of a conservative dislike of environmental, health, and safety regulation, and at the extremes, of evolution and legalized abortion. In The Republican War on Science , Chris Mooney ties together the disparate strands of the attack on science into a compelling and frightening account of our government's increasing unwillingness to distinguish between legitimate research and ideologically driven pseudoscience.

Looking For a Fight

As the new paperback edition announces, Mooney’s book, “brings this whole story together for the first time, weaving the disparate strands of the attack on science into a compelling and frightening account of our government’s ...

Looking For a Fight

In his 2005 bestseller, The Republican War on Science, journalist Chris Mooney made the case that, again and again, even overwhelming scientific consensus has met immovable political obstacles. And, again and again, those obstacles have arisen on the right—from the Bush administration, from coalitions of Republicans and from individually powerful Republicans. As the new paperback edition announces, Mooney’s book, “brings this whole story together for the first time, weaving the disparate strands of the attack on science into a compelling and frightening account of our government’s increasing unwillingness to distinguish between legitimate research and ideologically driven pseudoscience.” Looking for a Fight: Is There a Republican War on Science? started life as a ‘book event’—an online, roundtable-style critical symposium on Mooney’s work, hosted at Crooked Timber (crookedtimber.org). Eight contributors offered reviews, discussion and critical commentary. And Mooney responded to his critics.

Summary The Republican War on Science

Added-value of this summary: • Save time • Understand how right-wing politicians have waged a war on scientific truth • Expand your knowledge of American politics To learn more, read "The Republican War on Science" and discover how ...

Summary  The Republican War on Science

The must-read summary of Chris Mooney's book: “The Republican War on Science”. This complete summary of "The Republican War on Science" by Chris Mooney, a prominent American journalist and author, presents his analysis of how politicians, particularly those in the right wing, tend to either ignore or manipulate scientific truth to suit their own political agenda. Many Republicans' position on issues such as climate change, sex education, evolution and product safety go deliberately against the findings of legitimate and proven scientific research. Added-value of this summary: • Save time • Understand how right-wing politicians have waged a war on scientific truth • Expand your knowledge of American politics To learn more, read "The Republican War on Science" and discover how the line between legitimate scientific findings and the distorted truths of politicians are blurred for many right-wing politicians.

The Republican War on Science

The New York Times bestseller that exposes the conservative agenda to put politics ahead of scientific truth.

The Republican War on Science

"Science has never been more crucial than it is today to understanding the political issues facing the country; yet science and scientists have less influence with the federal government than at any time since Richard Nixon fired his science advisers. In the White House and Congress, research findings are reported in a politicized manner; spun or distorted to fit the speaker's agenda; or, when they're too inconvenient, ignored entirely. On a broad array of issues - stem cell research, climate change, missile defense, abstinence education, and many others - the Bush Administration's positions fly in the face of overwhelming scientific consensus. Federal science agencies, once fiercely independent under both Republican and Democratic presidents, are increasingly staffed by political appointees who know industry lobbyists and evangelical activists far better than they know the science." "This is not purely a Bush Administration phenomenon, but it is largely a Republican phenomenon, born of a conservative dislike of environmental, health and safety regulation, and of evolution and legalized abortion. In The Republican War on Science, Chris Mooney ties together the disparate strands of the attack on science into a compelling and frightening account of our government's increasing preference for ideologically driven pseudoscience over legitimate research."--BOOK JACKET.

The Republican Brain

Explains that the political parties reflect personality traits and psychological needs—with Republicans more wedded to certainty, Democrats to novelty—and this is the root of our divide over reality.

The Republican Brain

Bestselling author Chris Mooney uses cutting-edge research to explain the psychology behind why today’s Republicans reject reality—it's just part of who they are. From climate change to evolution, the rejection of mainstream science among Republicans is growing, as is the denial of expert consensus on the economy, American history, foreign policy and much more. Why won't Republicans accept things that most experts agree on? Why are they constantly fighting against the facts? Science writer Chris Mooney explores brain scans, polls, and psychology experiments to explain why conservatives today believe more wrong things; appear more likely than Democrats to oppose new ideas and less likely to change their beliefs in the face of new facts; and sometimes respond to compelling evidence by doubling down on their current beliefs. Goes beyond the standard claims about ignorance or corporate malfeasance to discover the real, scientific reasons why Republicans reject the widely accepted findings of mainstream science, economics, and history—as well as many undeniable policy facts (e.g., there were no “death panels” in the health care bill). Explains that the political parties reflect personality traits and psychological needs—with Republicans more wedded to certainty, Democrats to novelty—and this is the root of our divide over reality. Written by the author of The Republican War on Science, which was the first and still the most influential book to look at conservative rejection of scientific evidence. But the rejection of science is just the beginning… Certain to spark discussion and debate, The Republican Brain also promises to add to the lengthy list of persuasive scientific findings that Republicans reject and deny.

Storm World

In the wake of Katrina, Chris Mooney follows the careers of leading scientists on either side of the argument through the 2006 hurricane season, tracing how the media, special interests, politics, and the weather itself have skewed and ...

Storm World

An investigation into climate change and increasingly dangerous hurricanes from the New York Times–bestselling author of The Republican War on Science. A leading science journalist delves into a red-hot debate in meteorology: whether the increasing ferocity of hurricanes is connected to global warming. In the wake of Katrina, Chris Mooney follows the careers of leading scientists on either side of the argument through the 2006 hurricane season, tracing how the media, special interests, politics, and the weather itself have skewed and amplified what was already a fraught scientific debate. As Mooney puts it: “Scientists, like hurricanes, do extraordinary things at high wind speeds.” Mooney—a New Orleans native, host of the Point of Inquiry podcast, and author of The Republican Brain—has written “a well-researched, nuanced book” that closely examines whether we as a society should be held responsible for making hurricanes even bigger monsters than they already are (The New York Times). “Mooney serves his readers as both an empiricist who gathers data and an analyst who puts it into context. The result is an important book, whose author succeeds admirably in both his roles.” —The Plain Dealer “Engaging and readable . . . Mooney catches real science in the act and, in so doing, weaves a story as intriguing as it is important.” —Los Angeles Times Book Review “Mooney has hit upon an important and controversial topic, and attacks it with vigor.” —The Boston Globe “An absorbing, informed account of the politics behind a pressing contemporary controversy.” —Kirkus Reviews

Unscientific America

Journalist and bestselling author Mooney and scientist Kirshenbaum offer an impassioned polemic about the dangers of America's scientific illiteracy.

Unscientific America

Journalist and bestselling author Mooney and scientist Kirshenbaum offer an impassioned polemic about the dangers of America's scientific illiteracy. They go on to propose a broad array of initiatives that could lead to a greater integration of science into the national discourse.

Hubris The Troubling Science Economics and Politics of Climate Change

Environmental activist and journalist Chris Mooney, for example, gained a wide audience during the second Bush administration in the United States with his polemical The Republican War on Science, arguing in particular that the ...

Hubris  The Troubling Science  Economics  and Politics of Climate Change


Ideas Under Fire

Quoted in Chris Mooney, The Republican War on Science (New York: Basic Books, 2005), 148. 5. Liora Salter, Mandated Science: Science and Scientists in the Making of Standards (Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1988). 6.

Ideas Under Fire

The history of Western philosophy and science is marked by numerous moments when a major development has emerged from conditions that are manifestly adverse to intellectual activity. This book surveys a wide range of such cases, and considers how these achievements were possible and how adversity helped shape the ideas that emerged from these conditions.

The Republican War Against Women

This book is not a political science treatise nor a description of political campaigns; it is a documented account of a grab for power that, as the years pass, continues to intensify antagonism between the sexes and to sow unnecessary ...

The Republican War Against Women

In 1980, Republicans used appeals to sexist and racist bigotry to win the Presidency. The party adopted an electoral strategy that included getting votes by playing on the fear and uncertainty engendered by the civil rights and women's political movements, and continued to use this strategy in the campaigns of 1984, 1988, and 1992. Under the Reagan and Bush administrations, this strategy became a crucial part of the party's governing policies. This book is not a political science treatise nor a description of political campaigns; it is a documented account of a grab for power that, as the years pass, continues to intensify antagonism between the sexes and to sow unnecessary division among the American people. As a longtime Republican activist and a delegate to the 1992 convention, Tanya Melich has observed these actions from within; and documents this takeover and the Party's ongoing practices (such as embracing the Christian right) in a devastating, factual, and often hair-raising report. A combination of history, exposÄ, reasoned polemic, and call to arms, this book has now been enriched by two completely new chapters that assesses the outcome of the 1996 election in terms of the book's thesis and realistically lays out the future: both in terms of what it will be if the right-wing elements of the Republican party continue to set the agenda, and how it can be changed if centrist women (and men) take charge of that agenda. The heart of such change lies with Independents, who now constitute a startling 39 percent of Americans (31 percent identify themselves as Democrats and 30 percent as Republicans). We are not a country of strong party loyalties, and the enormous growth of independents is the signal that change is not only possible but achievable. As a superb political pro, the author offers hardheaded strategies for such change.

Evolution and Religious Creation Myths How Scientists Respond

How Scientists Respond Paul F. Lurquin School of Molecular Biosciences Washington State University, ... Author and journalist Chris Mooney presents a somewhat similar opinion in his book The Republican War on Science (2005).

Evolution and Religious Creation Myths   How Scientists Respond

Polls show that 45% of the American public believes that humans were created about 10,000 years ago and that evolution is non existent. Another 25% believes that changes in the natural world are directed by a supernatural being with a particular goal in mind. This thinking clashes frontally with scientific findings obtained in the past 150 years. A large portion of the general public espouses the views of creationists and their descendants, and ignores or is unaware of scientific advances. Critical thinking about the natural world within a scientific framework is lacking in the USA and many parts of the world. This manuscript provides a multidisciplinary explanation and defense for the science of evolution (not just Darwinism) as it is being challenged by arguments for "intelligent design" and other creation myths. It draws in the life, physical, and social sciences, and recent studies of human evolution that rely much on the idea of change over time, which is evolution writ large. It puts the evolution/ID issue into international perspective by including opinions held in world religions other than Christianity. It is clearly written and also can easily be used as a guide for those with some science background. The authors make a convincing case that other books do not achieve this as much as they do in this work. The book is written for a whole spectrum of educated people including teachers and teachers in training who are interested in the broad issues of the origins of the universe, life, and humans, and who may not quite grasp the potential magnitude of the negative influence on all of science education of people embracing creationist and ID thinking. This includes high school teachers and people on boards of education and in municipal governments--anyone involved in education. It could be used also in college courses such as "contemporary social issues" and "Science and Society" -- sometimes team taught by sociologists and scientists. The authors show that when they are teleological, dogmatic, or politically inspired, religious and creation myths threaten scientific efforts. The book does not require any extensive knowledge of science. The principle of change over time pervades all of science, from cosmology, to the search for the origin for life, to human physical and cultural evolution. The book educates readers on scientific matters that overwhelmingly support the idea of evolution, not only in the living world, but also in physical and social science. It explains too how evolution -- physical and biological -- is a random, unguided process whose roots can be already found in quantum physics.

Societal Impact of Spaceflight

They attack practicing scientists for the results of their research — the very content of science . One journalist has labeled this assault “ The Republican War on Science . One can argue , as physicist William Nierenberg did in the ...

Societal Impact of Spaceflight


The Presidency of George W Bush

18 Daniel Smith, “Political Science,” New york Times Magazine, September 5, 2005. 19 Chris Mooney, The Republican War on Science (New York: Basic Books, 2005). Other notable works on the Right's politicization of science (dating to ...

The Presidency of George W  Bush

The Presidency of George W. Bush brings together some of today's top American historians to offer the first in-depth look at one of the most controversial U.S. presidencies. Emotions surrounding the Bush presidency continue to run high--conservatives steadfastly defend its achievements, liberals call it a disgrace. This book examines the successes as well as the failures, covering every major aspect of Bush's two terms in office. It puts issues in broad historical context to reveal the forces that shaped and constrained Bush's presidency--and the ways his presidency reshaped the nation. The Presidency of George W. Bush features contributions by Mary L. Dudziak, Gary Gerstle, David Greenberg, Meg Jacobs, Michael Kazin, Kevin M. Kruse, Nelson Lichtenstein, Fredrik Logevall, Timothy Naftali, James T. Patterson, and the book's editor, Julian E. Zelizer. Each chapter tackles some important aspect of Bush's administration--such as presidential power, law, the war on terror, the Iraq invasion, economic policy, and religion--and helps readers understand why Bush made the decisions he did. Taking readers behind the headlines of momentous events, the contributors show how the quandaries of the Bush presidency were essentially those of conservatism itself, which was confronted by the hard realities of governance. They demonstrate how in fact Bush frequently disappointed the Right, and how Barack Obama's 2008 election victory cast the very tenets of conservatism in doubt. History will be the ultimate judge of Bush's legacy, and the assessment begins with this book.

Science Money and Politics

From the end of World War II to 2001, and from medical research to particle physics, Greenberg reveals the little-known but all-pervasive links among science, money, and politics in the United States.

Science  Money  and Politics

Greenberg explores how scientific research is funded in the United States, including why the political process distributes the funds the way it does and how it can be corrupted by special interests in academia, business, and political machines.

Hack the Planet

In Hack the Planet, Science magazine reporter Eli Kintisch looks more closely at this array of ideas and characters, asking if these risky schemes will work, and just how geoengineering is changing the world.

Hack the Planet

An inside tour of the incredible—and probably dangerous—plans to counteract the effects of climate change through experiments that range from the plausible to the fantastic David Battisti had arrived in Cambridge expecting a bloodbath. So had many of the other scientists who had joined him for an invitation-only workshop on climate science in 2007, with geoengineering at the top of the agenda. We can't take deliberately altering the atmosphere seriously, he thought, because there’s no way we'll ever know enough to control it. But by the second day, with bad climate news piling on bad climate news, he was having second thoughts. When the scientists voted in a straw poll on whether to support geoengineering research, Battisti, filled with fear about the future, voted in favor. While the pernicious effects of global warming are clear, efforts to reduce the carbon emissions that cause it have fallen far short of what’s needed. Some scientists have started exploring more direct and radical ways to cool the planet, such as: Pouring reflective pollution into the upper atmosphere Making clouds brighter Growing enormous blooms of algae in the ocean Schemes that were science fiction just a few years ago have become earnest plans being studied by alarmed scientists, determined to avoid a climate catastrophe. In Hack the Planet, Science magazine reporter Eli Kintisch looks more closely at this array of ideas and characters, asking if these risky schemes will work, and just how geoengineering is changing the world. Scientists are developing geoengineering techniques for worst-case scenarios. But what would those desperate times look like? Kintisch outlines four circumstances: collapsing ice sheets, megadroughts, a catastrophic methane release, and slowing of the global ocean conveyor belt. As incredible and outlandish as many of these plans may seem, could they soon become our only hope for avoiding calamity? Or will the plans of brilliant and well-intentioned scientists cause unforeseeable disasters as they play out in the real world? And does the advent of geoengineering mean that humanity has failed in its role as steward of the planet—or taken on a new responsibility? Kintisch lays out the possibilities and dangers of geoengineering in a time of planetary tipping points. His investigation is required reading as the debate over global warming shifts to whether humanity should Hack the Planet.

Critical Thinking

Pseudoscience and the Paranormal Jonathan C. Smith ... The conscious universe: The scientific truth of psychic phenomena. New York: HarperCollins. Randi, J. (1982). Flim‐Flam. ... The republican war on science. New York: Basic Books.

Critical Thinking

Rev. ed. of: Pseudoscience and extraordinary claims of the paranormal: a critical thinker's toolkit. 2010.

Scientific American

THE INDEPENDENT NEW IN PAPERBACK The REPUBLICAN WAR on SCIENCE CHRIS MOONEY • Fully Revised and Updated “ A well - researched , closely argued , and amply referenced indictment of the right wing's assault on science and scientists .

Scientific American


Issues in Science and Technology

Alas , what I found was a tiresome polemic masquerading as a defense of scientific purity . ( employment - oriented programs , such as wage insurance ) ; social prompting ... The REPUBLICAN WAR on SCIENCE CHRIS MOONEY Catherine L. Mann ...

Issues in Science and Technology


The Republican Party and the Korean War

"The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the response of the Republican Party to the Korean War.

The Republican Party and the Korean War

"The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the response of the Republican Party to the Korean War. While the G.O.P. was deeply involved in the final months of the war because of the election of Eisenhower and a Republican Congress, the party's reaction to the shifting pattern of the war before the November, 1952 election influenced the way in which the United States dealt with the Far Eastern conflict"--Page [1].

The Publishers Weekly

The Republican War on Science D with travel ( in a series of poems about life in Rome ) , with persona poems and satire ( " Directions for Carrying Explosive Nuclear Waste Through Metropolitan New York ” ; “ The Beirut Jokebook ...

The Publishers Weekly