The Roman Empire

Offers a history of the Roman Empire from 44 B.C. to A.D. 235.

The Roman Empire

Offers a history of the Roman Empire from 44 B.C. to A.D. 235.

The City in the Roman Empire

The City in the Roman Empire presents the distinct experiences of men, women, and children who lived urban lifestyles in the ancient empire. This book examines the pros and cons of city living, including opinions of Romans themselves.

The City in the Roman Empire

The Roman Empire was more than just the city of Rome. Cities throughout the empire boasted paved roads, apartment complexes, and public baths. The City in the Roman Empire presents the distinct experiences of men, women, and children who lived urban lifestyles in the ancient empire. This book examines the pros and cons of city living, including opinions of Romans themselves.

Secret Histories The Romans

Illustrated by graphic novelist Isabel Greenberg and researched by her sister, Imogen Greenberg, this series of books are presented as comic strips which offer a fresh and accessible entry point to core educational topics for children 8+.

Secret Histories  The Romans

The second in a series on key historical periods, launching with the Romans and Ancient Egyptians and followed by the Vikings and Ancient Greeks. Each spread explores a different theme or topic specific to the Romans, including the Roman Empire, gladiators, the Roman Army and the engineering and architechtural feats, and a timeline. Illustrated by graphic novelist Isabel Greenberg and researched by her sister, Imogen Greenberg, this series of books are presented as comic strips which offer a fresh and accessible entry point to core educational topics for children 8+.

Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire

The contributors present the development of Roman cultural identity throughout the empire as a complex and two-way process, far removed from the previous dichotomy between the Roman invaders and the conquered Barbarians." --Book Jacket.

Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire

"This provocative and controversial volume examines the notions of ethnicity, citizenship and nationhood to determine what constituted cultural identity in the Roman empire. The contributors draw together the most recent research and use diverse theoretical and methodological perspectives from archaeology, classical studies and ancient history to challenge our basic assumptions of Romanization and how parts of Europe became incorporated into a Roman culture." "Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire breaks new ground, negating the idea of a unified and easily defined Roman culture as over-simplistic. The contributors present the development of Roman cultural identity throughout the empire as a complex and two-way process, far removed from the previous dichotomy between the Roman invaders and the conquered Barbarians." --Book Jacket.

The Architecture of the Roman Empire

Examines Roman architecture as a party of overall urban design and looks at arches, public buildings, tombs, columns, stairs, plazas, and streets

The Architecture of the Roman Empire

Examines Roman architecture as a party of overall urban design and looks at arches, public buildings, tombs, columns, stairs, plazas, and streets

The Government of the Roman Empire

This book reveals how an empire that stretched from Glasgow to Aswan in Egypt could be ruled from a single city and still survive more than a thousand years.

The Government of the Roman Empire

This book reveals how an empire that stretched from Glasgow to Aswan in Egypt could be ruled from a single city and still survive more than a thousand years. The Government of the Roman Empire is the only sourcebook to concentrate on the administration of the empire, using the evidence of contemporary writers and historians. Specifically designed for students, with extensive cross-referencing, bibliographies and introductions and explanations for each item, this new edition brings the book right up-to-date, and makes it the ideal resource for students of the subject.

The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire

A new preface explores Roman imperial statecraft. This illuminating book remains essential to both ancient historians and students of modern strategy.

The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire

At the height of its power, the Roman Empire encompassed the entire Mediterranean basin, extending much beyond it from Britain to Mesopotamia, from the Rhine to the Black Sea. Rome prospered for centuries while successfully resisting attack, fending off everything from overnight robbery raids to full-scale invasion attempts by entire nations on the move. How were troops able to defend the Empire’s vast territories from constant attacks? And how did they do so at such moderate cost that their treasury could pay for an immensity of highways, aqueducts, amphitheaters, city baths, and magnificent temples? In The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire, seasoned defense analyst Edward N. Luttwak reveals how the Romans were able to combine military strength, diplomacy, and fortifications to effectively respond to changing threats. Rome’s secret was not ceaseless fighting, but comprehensive strategies that unified force, diplomacy, and an immense infrastructure of roads, forts, walls, and barriers. Initially relying on client states to buffer attacks, Rome moved to a permanent frontier defense around 117 CE. Finally, as barbarians began to penetrate the empire, Rome filed large armies in a strategy of “defense-in-depth,” allowing invaders to pierce Rome’s borders. This updated edition has been extensively revised to incorporate recent scholarship and archeological findings. A new preface explores Roman imperial statecraft. This illuminating book remains essential to both ancient historians and students of modern strategy.

Experiencing Rome

Unique in their broad-based coverage the twelve essays in this book provide a fresh look at some central aspects of Roman culture and society.

Experiencing Rome

Unique in their broad-based coverage the twelve essays in this book provide a fresh look at some central aspects of Roman culture and society.

The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

The work covers the history of the Roman Empire, Europe, and the Catholic Church from 98 to 1590 and discusses the decline of the Roman Empire in the East and West.

The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

All six volumes are contained in this eBook. There is a linked table of contents, and the footnotes are also linked. Gibbon’s masterpiece, which narrates the history of the Roman Empire from the second century A.D. to its collapse in the west in the fifth century and in the east in the fifteenth century, is widely considered the greatest work of history ever written. The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (sometimes shortened to Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire) is a book of history written by the English historian Edward Gibbon, which traces the trajectory of Western civilization (as well as the Islamic and Mongolian conquests) from the height of the Roman Empire to the fall of Byzantium. Published in six volumes, volume I was published in 1776 and went through six printings. Volumes II and III were published in 1781; Volumes IV, V, and VI in 1788–89. The original volumes were published in quarto sections, a common publishing practice of the time. The work covers the history of the Roman Empire, Europe, and the Catholic Church from 98 to 1590 and discusses the decline of the Roman Empire in the East and West. Because of its relative objectivity and heavy use of primary sources, at the time its methodology became a model for later historians. This led to Gibbon being called the first "modern historian of ancient Rome". Gibbon offers an explanation for why the Roman Empire fell, a task made difficult by a lack of comprehensive written sources, though he was not the only historian to tackle the subject. According to Gibbon, the Roman Empire succumbed to barbarian invasions in large part due to the gradual loss of civic virtue among its citizens. They had become weak, outsourcing their duties to defend their Empire to barbarian mercenaries, who then became so numerous and ingrained that they were able to take over the Empire. Romans, he believed, had become effeminate, unwilling to live a tougher, "manly" military lifestyle. In addition, Gibbon argued that Christianity created a belief that a better life existed after death, which fostered an indifference to the present among Roman citizens, thus sapping their desire to sacrifice for the Empire. He also believed its comparative pacifism tended to hamper the traditional Roman martial spirit. Finally, like other Enlightenment thinkers, Gibbon held in contempt the Middle Ages as a priest-ridden, superstitious dark age. It was not until his own age of reason and rational thought, it was believed, that human history could resume its progress. Gibbon saw the Praetorian Guard as the primary catalyst of the empire's initial decay and eventual collapse, a seed planted by Augustus at the establishment of the empire. He cites repeated examples of the Praetorian Guard abusing their power with calamitous results, including numerous instances of imperial assassination and incessant demands for increased pay. Gibbon's style is frequently distinguished by an ironically detached and somewhat dispassionate yet critical tone. He occasionally lapsed into moralization and aphorism. "As long as mankind shall continue to bestow more liberal applause on their destroyers than on their benefactors, the thirst of military glory will ever be the vice of the most exalted characters". "The influence of the clergy, in an age of superstition, might be usefully employed to assert the rights of mankind; but so intimate is the connection between the throne and the altar, that the banner of the church has very seldom been seen on the side of the people"(Chapter Three). "History...is, indeed, little more than the register of the crimes, follies, and misfortune of mankind"(ibid). "If we contrast the rapid progress of this mischievous discovery [of gunpowder] with the slow and laborious advances of reason, science, and the arts of peace, a philosopher, according to his temper, will laugh or weep at the folly of mankind" (Chapter).

The Roman Empire at Bay AD 180 395

Updated for a new generation of students, this book remains a crucial tool in the study of this period.

The Roman Empire at Bay  AD 180 395

The Roman Empire at Bay is the only one volume history of the critical years 180-395 AD, which saw the transformation of the Roman Empire from a unitary state centred on Rome, into a new polity with two capitals and a new religion—Christianity. The book integrates social and intellectual history into the narrative, looking to explore the relationship between contingent events and deeper structure. It also covers an amazingly dramatic narrative from the civil wars after the death of Commodus through the conversion of Constantine to the arrival of the Goths in the Roman Empire, setting in motion the final collapse of the western empire. The new edition takes account of important new scholarship in questions of Roman identity, on economy and society as well as work on the age of Constantine, which has advanced significantly in the last decade, while recent archaeological and art historical work is more fully drawn into the narrative. At its core, the central question that drivesThe Roman Empire at Bay remains, what did it mean to be a Roman and how did that meaning change as the empire changed? Updated for a new generation of students, this book remains a crucial tool in the study of this period.

Everyday Life in the Roman Empire

This volume looks at all these aspects of life in the Roman Empire.

Everyday Life in the Roman Empire

This volume looks at all these aspects of life in the Roman Empire.

Policing the Roman Empire

Drawing on a wide variety of source material from art archaeology, administrative documents, Egyptian papyri, laws Jewish and Christian religious texts and ancient narratives this book provides a comprehensive overview of Roman imperial ...

Policing the Roman Empire

Drawing on a wide variety of source material from art archaeology, administrative documents, Egyptian papyri, laws Jewish and Christian religious texts and ancient narratives this book provides a comprehensive overview of Roman imperial policing practices.

The Roman Empire and Medieval Realms

When Maggie protests about the inaccuracies in the article, Ike is fired. Ike decides to pursue the story further, and journeys to Maryland, where he meets Maggie and discovers she is due to be married for a fourth time.

The Roman Empire and Medieval Realms

Romantic comedy triple. Sandra Bullock stars in 'The Proposal' (2009) as Margaret Tate, a tyrannical business executive on the brink of deportation from the United States back to her homeland of Canada. Margaret coerces her young assistant Andrew (Ryan Reynolds) into marrying her so that she can stay in the country and he can stay in his job. In order to keep up the facade, Margaret must now endure a trip to Alaska to meet her future in-laws (Mary Steenburgen and Craig T. Nelson). In 'Runaway Bride' (1999), Ike Graham (Richard Gere) is a successful, flippant and misogynstic New York journalist, who writes an accusing piece on the antics of Maggie Carpenter (Julia Roberts), a Maryland woman who has left three men at the altar. When Maggie protests about the inaccuracies in the article, Ike is fired. Ike decides to pursue the story further, and journeys to Maryland, where he meets Maggie and discovers she is due to be married for a fourth time. As Ike gets to know Maggie, he begins to fall for her charms, and realises why so many men before have been led down the aisle. In 'Pretty Woman', lonely businessman Edward Lewis (Richard Gere) hires LA prostitute Vivian Ward (Julia Roberts) to give him directions when he gets lost, and later to be his escort while he goes wheeling and dealing for a week. He buys her clothes, she softens his heart and the unlikely couple fall head over heels in love.

Traffic and Congestion in the Roman Empire

Presented in an illustrated format, this book looks at the construction of Roman road and studies the myriad of road users of the Roman Empire, from the civilians to the army.

Traffic and Congestion in the Roman Empire

First Published in 2007. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Church in the Roman Empire

The Church in the Roman Empire


The Immense Majesty

Integrates social, economic, cultural and religious aspects of Roman life with the rise and fall of the Republic.

The Immense Majesty

Integrates social, economic, cultural and religious aspects of Roman life with the rise and fall of the Republic. The author explores the achievements and decay of the imperial system to the time of Justinian and provides information about Roman women.

Hadrian and the Cities of the Roman Empire

This book explores the reasons for the explosion of city life throughout the Roman empire during the reign of Hadrian.

Hadrian and the Cities of the Roman Empire

This book explores the reasons for the explosion of city life throughout the Roman empire during the reign of Hadrian. The author finds the answer in the personality of Hadrian himself, as a patron of the arts, promoter of civic liberties and pride and as a skilled diplomat and tourist.

The Roman Empire

In the lively and engaging style that he’s known for, Philip Matyszak traces the history of the Roman Empire from the fall of the Assyrians and the rise of the Roman Republic through to the ages of expansion, crisis and eventual split.

The Roman Empire

No other political entity has shaped the modern world like the Roman Empire. Encompassing close to a quarter of the world’s population and 3 million km2 of land, it represented a diverse and dynamic collection of nations, states and tribes, all bound to Rome and the ideal of a Roman identity. In the lively and engaging style that he’s known for, Philip Matyszak traces the history of the Roman Empire from the fall of the Assyrians and the rise of the Roman Republic through to the ages of expansion, crisis and eventual split. Breathing new life into these extraordinary events, Matyszak explains how the empire operated, deploying its incredibly military machine to conquer vast territory then naturalizing its subject peoples as citizens of Rome. It was a method of rule so sophisticated that loyalty to Rome remained strong even afters its collapse creating an expansive legacy that continues to this day.