The Roman Invasion of Britain

Using the full range of historical and archaeology sources, this book explores the background to the invasion, describes the actual landings and details the shape of the new province.

The Roman Invasion of Britain

In AD 43 - almost 100 years after Julius Caesar's punitive expedition - Britain was invaded for the second time. Using the full range of historical and archaeology sources, this book explores the background to the invasion, describes the actual landings and details the shape of the new province.

The Roman Invasion of Britain

The purpose of this book is to take what we think we know about the Roman Conquest of Britain from historical sources, and compare it with the archaeological evidence, which is often contradictory.

The Roman Invasion of Britain

The purpose of this book is to take what we think we know about the Roman Conquest of Britain from historical sources, and compare it with the archaeological evidence, which is often contradictory. Archaeologists and historians all too often work in complete isolation from each other and this book hopes to show the dangers of neglecting either form of evidence. In the process it challenges much received wisdom about the history of Roman Britain. ??Birgitta Hoffmann tackles the subject by taking a number of major events or episodes (such as Caesar's incursions, Claudius' invasion, Boudicca's revolt), presenting the accepted narrative as derived from historical sources, and then presenting the archaeological evidence for the same. The result of this innovative approach is a book full of surprising and controversial conclusions that will appeal to the general reader as well as those studying or teaching courses on ancient history or archaeology.

The Roman Conquest of Britannia

In the new province, the Romans eventually constructed a military outpost overlooking a bridge across the River Thames. The new outpost was named Londinium, and it covered just over two dozen acres.

The Roman Conquest of Britannia

*Includes pictures *Includes ancient accounts of Britain *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading "[The Romans] thinking that it might be some help to the allies [Britons], whom they were forced to abandon, constructed a strong stone wall from sea to sea, in a straight line between the towns that had been there built for fear of the enemy, where Severus also had formerly built a rampart." - Bede's description of Hadrian's Wall in the Middle Ages The famous conqueror from the European continent came ashore with thousands of men, ready to set up a new kingdom in England. The Britons had resisted the amphibious invasion from the moment his forces landed, but he was able to push forward. In a large winter battle, the Britons' large army attacked the invaders but was eventually routed, and the conqueror was able to set up a new kingdom. Over 1,100 years before William the Conqueror became the King of England after the Battle of Hastings, Julius Caesar came, saw, and conquered part of "Britannia," setting up a Roman province with a puppet king in 54 BCE. In the new province, the Romans eventually constructed a military outpost overlooking a bridge across the River Thames. The new outpost was named Londinium, and it covered just over two dozen acres. For most of the past 1,000 years, London has been the most dominant city in the world, ruling over so much land that it was said the Sun never set on the British Empire. With the possible exception of Rome, no city has ever been more important or influential than London in human history. Thus, it was only fitting that it was the Romans who established London as a prominent city. Londinium was initially little more than a small military outpost near the northern boundary of the Roman province of Britannia, but its access to the River Thames and the North Sea made it a valuable location for a port. During the middle of the 1st century CE, the Romans conducted another invasion of the British Isles, after which Londinium began to grow rapidly. As the Romans stationed legions there to defend against the Britons, Londinium became a thriving international port, allowing trade with Rome and other cities across the empire. By the 2nd century CE, Londinium was a large Roman city, with tens of thousands of inhabitants using villas, palaces, a forum, temples, and baths. The Roman governor ruled from the city in a basilica that served as the seat of government. What was once a 30 acre outpost now spanned 300 acres and was home to nearly 15,000 people, including Roman soldiers, officials and foreign merchants. The Romans also built heavy defenses for the city, constructing several forts and the massive London Wall, parts of which are still scattered across the city today. Ancient Roman remains continue to dot London's landscape today, reminding everyone that almost a millennium before it became the home of royalty, London was already a center of power. The Romans were master builders, and much of what they built has stood the test of time. Throughout their vast empire they have left grand structures, from the Forum and Pantheon in Rome to the theatres and hippodromes of North Africa and the triumphal gates in Anatolia and France. Wherever they went, the Romans built imposing structures to show their power and ability, and one of their most impressive constructions was built on the northernmost fringe of the empire. Shortly after the emperor Hadrian came to power in the early 2nd century CE, he decided to seal off Scotland from Roman Britain with an ambitious wall stretching from sea to sea. To accomplish this, the wall had to be built from the mouth of the River Tyne - where Newcastle stands today - 80 Roman miles (76 miles or 122 kilometers) west to Bowness-on-Solway. The sheer scale of the job still impresses people today, and Hadrian's Wall has the advantage of being systematically studied and partially restored.

The Roman Invasion of Britain

Before we discuss where the Romans invaded, it is perhaps necessary to step back from the details of the campaign and look at the larger picture, because the Britain at the eve of the Claudian invasion was a very different place from ...

The Roman Invasion of Britain

The purpose of this book is to take what we think we know about the Roman Conquest of Britain from historical sources, and compare it with the archaeological evidence, which is often contradictory. Archaeologists and historians all too often work in complete isolation from each other and this book hopes to show the dangers of neglecting either form of evidence. In the process it challenges much received wisdom about the history of Roman Britain. Birgitta Hoffmann tackles the subject by taking a number of major events or episodes (such as Caesar's incursions, Claudius' invasion, Boudicca's revolt), presenting the accepted narrative as derived from historical sources, and then presenting the archaeological evidence for the same. The result of this innovative approach is a book full of surprising and controversial conclusions that will appeal to the general reader as well as those studying or teaching courses on ancient history or archaeology.

The Roman Invasion of Britain

My interest in the Roman invasion and early campaigns in Britain was first aroused by an investigation of the legionary fortress at Lincoln, 1938–45 (JRS 39 (1949) 57–78). There was little opportunity for doing any serious research work ...

The Roman Invasion of Britain

Graham Webster gives background on Britain before the invasion and goes on to describe the Roman forces, the personalities involved, the actual invasion and Claudius' triumphal entrance into Camulodunum, the British capital.

Roman Britain A Very Short Introduction

Weaving together the results of archaeological investigation and historical scholarship in a readable, concise account, this text charts life in Roman Britain from the first Roman invasion to the final collapse of the Roman Empire, around ...

Roman Britain  A Very Short Introduction

Weaving together the results of archaeological investigation and historical scholarship in a readable, concise account, this text charts life in Roman Britain from the first Roman invasion to the final collapse of the Roman Empire, around 500 AD.

The Great Invasion

History of the Roman invasion and occupation of Britain from the first reconnaissance by Caesar in 55 B.C. to the final battle at Mons Graupius in 84 A.D. Based on both classic sources and archaeological evidence.

The Great Invasion

History of the Roman invasion and occupation of Britain from the first reconnaissance by Caesar in 55 B.C. to the final battle at Mons Graupius in 84 A.D. Based on both classic sources and archaeological evidence.

Beric the Briton

Beric the Briton, A Story of the Roman Invasion (1893) is a historical novel by British author G.A. Henty. It tells of the Roman invasion of Britain through the eyes of a "half Romanized" Briton, Beric.

Beric the Briton

Beric the Briton, A Story of the Roman Invasion (1893) is a historical novel by British author G.A. Henty. It tells of the Roman invasion of Britain through the eyes of a "half Romanized" Briton, Beric. Plot: The main character is Beric, a young Briton under Roman subjugation. After he is raised to the rank of chief among his tribe, known as the Iceni, he and his tribe rise up against Roman rule under Queen Boudica. The strong but untrained Britons have success for a short time, but are quickly conquered again by the well-trained legionaries. Beric and a small band of men fight to the last from the swamps, conducting a sort of guerrilla warfare. At last he and his men are captured, and Beric is sent to Rome as a gladiator. While in Rome, he becomes friends with some who belong to the rising sect of Christians. When a Christian girl is given to the lions in the Roman amphitheatre, Beric dashes to the rescue and kills a lion single-handedly. Taken as a guard to Nero, the mighty emperor, Beric is horrified at the drunken revelry which takes place, and escapes from the palace. At last he is enabled to go back to Britain, though not after many more adventures. (wikipedia.org)

The End of Roman Britain

Britain was never as thoroughly conquered as traditional historians would have us believe, according to Michael E. Jones. Among the provinces long occupied by Rome, Britain retained the slightest imprint of the invading civilization.

The End of Roman Britain

Jones offers a lucid and thorough analysis of the economic, social, military, and environmental problems that contributed to the failure of the Romans, drawing on literary sources and on recent archaeological evidence.

The Romans in Britain

The Romans in Britain


Roman Britain

An illustrated chronicle of Britain as a Roman province places the region's conquest and occupation by Rome within a larger context of Romano-British society, in an account that includes coverage of such topics as the construction of ...

Roman Britain

An illustrated chronicle of Britain as a Roman province places the region's conquest and occupation by Rome within a larger context of Romano-British society, in an account that includes coverage of such topics as the construction of Hadrian's Wall, the rule of the emperor Honorius, and the recent archaeological discovery of the Colchester stadium.

Londinium

John Morris' LONDINIUM is an authoritative account of London's first 600 years, from pre-Roman to Saxon times.

Londinium

At the time of the Roman invasion of Britain, the site of London was an untamed, uninhabited forest, and the victorious fleet founded Londinium, not as a garrison or a fortress, but as a centre of government. This is the story of earliest London from pre-Roman times to the age of Arthur.

Julius Caesar s Invasion of Britain

The Romans invaded Britain in 55 BC and 54 BC under Julius Caesar and again in 43 AD under the Emperor Claudius. The landings of Julius Caesar in Britain are not often discussed, mainly because they tend to be regarded as invasions ...

Julius Caesar s Invasion of Britain

In this landmark study, an amateur historian tackles the unanswered questions surrounding Julius Caesar’s time in Britain. Two thousand years ago, Julius Caesar came, saw, and conquered southern Britain, but exactly where he landed and the precise routes his army marched through the south of the country have never been firmly established. Numerous sites have been suggested for the Roman landings of 55 B.C. and 54 B.C., yet remarkably, the exact locations of the first major events in recorded British history remain undiscovered—until now. After years of careful analysis, Roger Nolan has painstakingly traced not only the places where the Romans landed, but he has also discovered four temporary marching camps Caesar’s army built as it drove up from the south coast in pursuit of the British tribal leader, Cassivellaunus. This advance took Caesar across the Thames to Cassivellaunus’s stronghold at Wheathampstead in present-day Hertfordshire. These marching camps are placed almost equidistant from each other and, most importantly, are in a straight line between the coast and Wheathampstead. Roger Nolan’s research has also enabled him to identify the place mentioned in Caesar’s Commentaries, where the Roman legions were ambushed by the British while foraging and where a large battle then ensued—the first known land battle in Britain. Without doubt, this groundbreaking study is certain to prompt much discussion and reappraisal of this fascinating subject.

British Celtic Warrior vs Roman Soldier

Featuring full-colour maps and specially commissioned battlescene and figure artwork plates, this book examines how both the British warriors and the Roman auxiliaries experienced the decades of conflict that followed the invasion.

British Celtic Warrior vs Roman Soldier

An illustrated study of the British tribal warriors and Roman auxiliaries who fought in three epic battles for control of Britain in the 1st century AD. Following the Roman invasion of Britain in AD 43, the tribes of the west and north resisted the establishment of a 'Roman peace', led in particular by the chieftain Caratacus. Even in the south-east, resentment of Roman occupation remained, exploding into the revolt of Boudicca's Iceni in AD 60. Roman auxiliaries from two particular peoples are known to have taken part in the invasion of Britain: the Tungrians, from what is now Belgium, and the Batavians, from the delta of the River Rhine in the modern Netherlands. From the late 80s AD, units of both the Batavians and the Tungrians were garrisoned at a fort at Vindolanda in northern Britain. The so called 'Vindolanda tablets' provide an unparalleled body of material with which to reconstruct the lives of these auxiliary soldiers in Britain. Featuring full-colour maps and specially commissioned battlescene and figure artwork plates, this book examines how both the British warriors and the Roman auxiliaries experienced the decades of conflict that followed the invasion. Their recruitment, training, leadership, motivation, culture and beliefs are compared alongside an assessment of three particular battles: the final defeat of Caratacus in the hills of Wales in AD 50; the Roman assault on the island of Mona (Anglesey) in AD 60; and the battle of Mons Graupius in Scotland in AD 83.