The Sea and Poison

Young interns Suguro, compelled by circumstance, Toda, a cynic, and Nurse Ueda, numbed by tragedy, take part in experiments the Japanese doctors are performing on their American prisoners At the outset of this powerful story we find a ...

The Sea and Poison

Young interns Suguro, compelled by circumstance, Toda, a cynic, and Nurse Ueda, numbed by tragedy, take part in experiments the Japanese doctors are performing on their American prisoners

The Sea and Poison

Set in a Japanese hospital during the last days of World War II, the story centers on the medical staff who offer to assist in a series of vivisections--experimental operations on live U.S. prisoners of war.

The Sea and Poison

On the first day of First Surgery's project, three prisoners were scheduled for operations. The aims of the vivisection experiment were described as follows: 1. Saline is to be injected into the blood stream. The quantitative limits of such a procedure before death occurs are to be ascertained. 2. Air is to be injected into the veins and the volume at which death occurs is to be ascertained. 3. The limit to which the bronchial tubes may be cut before death occurs is to be ascertained. Set in a Japanese hospital during the last days of World War II, the story centers on the medical staff who offer to assist in a series of vivisections--experimental operations on live U.S. prisoners of war. The Sea and Poison won the Akutagawa Prize when it was published in Japan in 1958 and established Shusaku Endo in the forefront of modern Japanese literature. Today it remains as startling and, sadly, as relevant as ever.

The Sea and Poison

The Sea and Poison


The Sea and Poison

The Sea and Poison


The Sea and Poison

The Sea and Poison


Sachiko

Sachiko, set in Nagasaki in the painful years between 1930 and 1945, is the story of two young people trying to find love during yet another period in which Japanese Christians were accused of disloyalty to their country.

Sachiko

In novels such as Silence, Endō Shūsaku examined the persecution of Japanese Christians in different historical eras. Sachiko, set in Nagasaki in the painful years between 1930 and 1945, is the story of two young people trying to find love during yet another period in which Japanese Christians were accused of disloyalty to their country. In the 1930s, two young Japanese Christians, Sachiko and Shūhei, are free to play with American children in their neighborhood. But life becomes increasingly difficult for them and other Christians after Japan launches wars of aggression. Meanwhile, a Polish Franciscan priest and former missionary in Nagasaki, Father Maximillian Kolbe, is arrested after returning to his homeland. Endō alternates scenes between Nagasaki—where the growing love between Sachiko and Shūhei is imperiled by mounting persecution—and Auschwitz, where the priest has been sent. Shūhei’s dilemma deepens when he faces conscription into the Japanese military, conflicting with the Christian belief that killing is a sin. With the A-bomb attack on Nagasaki looming in the distance, Endō depicts ordinary people trying to live lives of faith in a wartime situation that renders daily life increasingly unbearable. Endō’s compassion for his characters, reflecting their struggles to find and share love for others, makes Sachiko one of his most moving novels.

From Book to Screen Modern Japanese Literature in Films

Suguro sees the “darkened sea” after he is told by Toda that the patients are ... Like Endo's novel, Kei Kumai's film The Sea and Poison studies Japanese ...

From Book to Screen  Modern Japanese Literature in Films

Of all the world s cinemas, Japan's is perhaps unique in its closeness to the nation's literature, past and contemporary. The Western world became aware of this when Akira Kurosawa's Rashomon was awarded the Grand Prize at the Venice film festival in 1951 and the Oscar for best foreign film in 1952. More recent examples include Shohei Imamura's Eel, which won the Palm d'Or (Best Picture) at Cannes in 1997.From Book to Screen breaks new ground by exploring important connections between Japan's modern literary tradition and its national cinema. The first part offers an historical and cultural overview of the working relationship that developed between pure literature and film. It deals with three important periods in which filmmakers relied most heavily on literary works for enriching and developing cinematic art. The second part provides detailed analyses of a dozen literary works and their screen adoptions.

Reading Contemporary Performance

... the body politic, and the body earth, Goat Island's “eco-performance” The Sea & Poison challenges our understanding of images and their power to affect ...

Reading Contemporary Performance

As the nature of contemporary performance continues to expand into new forms, genres and media, it requires an increasingly diverse vocabulary. Reading Contemporary Performance provides students, critics and creators with a rich understanding of the key terms and ideas that are central to any discussion of this evolving theatricality. Specially commissioned entries from a wealth of contributors map out the many and varied ways of discussing performance in all of its forms – from theatrical and site-specific performances to live and New Media art. The book is divided into two sections: Concepts - Key terms and ideas arranged according to the five characteristic elements of performance art: time; space; action; performer; audience. Methodologies and Turning Points - The seminal theories and ways of reading performance, such as postmodernism, epic theatre, feminisms, happenings and animal studies. Case Studies – entries in both sections are accompanied by short studies of specific performances and events, demonstrating creative examples of the ideas and issues in question. Three different introductory essays provide multiple entry points into the discussion of contemporary performance, and cross-references for each entry also allow the plotting of one’s own pathway. Reading Contemporary Performance is an invaluable guide, providing not just a solid set of familiarities, but an exploration and contextualisation of this broad and vital field.

The Impossible Poison

The Impossible   Poison


Japan s Wartime Medical Atrocities

The protagonist of Umi to dokuyaku [The Sea and Poison] (Endo 1971), Suguro, is given the option of declining his boss's invitation to participate in the ...

Japan s Wartime Medical Atrocities

Prior to and during the Second World War, the Japanese Army established programs of biological warfare throughout China and elsewhere. In these “factories of death,” including the now-infamous Unit 731, Japanese doctors and scientists conducted large numbers of vivisections and experiments on human beings, mostly Chinese nationals. However, as a result of complex historical factors including an American cover-up of the atrocities, Japanese denials, and inadequate responses from successive Chinese governments, justice has never been fully served. This volume brings together the contributions of a group of scholars from different countries and various academic disciplines. It examines Japan’s wartime medical atrocities and their postwar aftermath from a comparative perspective and inquires into perennial issues of historical memory, science, politics, society and ethics elicited by these rebarbative events. The volume’s central ethical claim is that the failure to bring justice to bear on the systematic abuse of medical research by Japanese military medical personnel more than six decades ago has had a profoundly retarding influence on the development and practice of medical and social ethics in all of East Asia. The book also includes an extensive annotated bibliography selected from relevant publications in Japanese, Chinese and English.

End Sh saku

burgeoning reputation during this time: The Sea and Poison, Wonderful Fool and The Girl I Left Behind. The Sea and Poison Of these, The Sea and Poison can ...

End   Sh  saku

Endö Shüsaka is probably the most widely translated of all Japanese authors. In this first major study of Endö's works, Mark Williams moves the discussion on from the well-worn depictions of Endö as the 'Japanese Graham Greene', and places him in his own political and cultural context.

American Theatre Ensembles Volume 1

The next performance, The Sea & Poison, received its name from the book The Sea and Poison by Shusaki Endo. Although an initial prompt for this piece asked ...

American Theatre Ensembles Volume 1

Across two volumes, Mike Vanden Heuvel and a strong roster of contributors present the history, processes, and achievements of American theatre companies renowned for their use of collective and/or ensemble-based techniques to generate new work. This first study considers theatre companies that were working between 1970 and 1995: it traces the rise and eventual diversification of activist-based companies that emerged to serve particular constituencies from the countercultural politics of the 1960s, and examines the shift in the 1980s that gave rise to the next generation of company-based work, rooted in a new interest in form and the more mediated and dispersed forms of politics. Ensembles examined are Mabou Mines, Theatre X, Goat Island, Lookingglass, Elevator Repair Service, and SITI Company. Preliminary chapters provide a sweeping overview of ensemble-based creation within the general historical and cultural contexts of the period, followed by a detailed study of the evolution of ensemble-based work. The case studies consider factors such as influence, funding, production, and legacies, as well as the forms of collective devising and creation, while surveying the continuing work of significant long-running companies. Contributors provide detailed case studies of the 6 companies from the period and cover: * A chronicle of development and methods * Key productions and projects * Critical reception and legacy * A chronological overview of significant productions From the long history of collective theatre creation, with its sources in social crises, urgent aesthetic experimentation and utopian dreaming, American ensemble-based theatre has emerged at several key points in history to challenge the primacy of author-based and director-produced theatre. As the volume demonstrates, US ensemble companies have collectively revolutionized the form and content of contemporary performance, influencing experimental, as well as mainstream practice.

Prisoners of the Poison Sea

Yellowish clouds are boiling up from the sea below the ship. Hovering over the sea are hundreds of metal cages. Each one swings on a chain hanging from a ...

Prisoners of the Poison Sea

After a recent daring escape attempt, Zak Nine and his Quom friend Erro are imprisoned in the most inescapable region of Alcatraz. The boys are locked in separate cages, hovering at the end of unbreakable chains over a boiling sea of poison. How will the boys escape their latest dilemma? Even if they break out of their cells, how will they travel across the venomous waters to safety? It's the most perilous adventure yet as the boys try to escape from Planet Alcatraz.

Transcultural Theodicy in the Fiction of Sh saku End

... each of them provided with a title : 1 ) Umi to Dokuyaku [ The Sea and Poison ) ; 2 ) Sabakareru hitobito delle zon Z1 = [ Those to Be Judged ] ...

Transcultural Theodicy in the Fiction of Sh  saku End

Il presente studio parte da una domanda: come definire la missione? Ha senso porsi questa domanda a quarant'anni dal Decreto AG nel terzo millennio? La caduta del muro di Berlino, le nuove tensioni internazionali richiedono una risposta da parte dei cristiani. Qui viene scelto il teologo Yves Congar (1904-1995) testimone dei difficili momenti della Chiesa in Francia. Ha vissuto due guerrre mondiali, ha fatto l'esperienza dell'esilio ed è un servitore della Verità.

Miltary Medical Ethics Volume 2

The Sea and Poison is both a harrowing and a haunting novel, telling the story, in thinly disguised fiction, of the vivisection of an American airman who ...

Miltary Medical Ethics  Volume 2


Worse Things Happen at Sea

It's excitement ahoy in this madcap story, full of hilarious and outrageous characters, including the loveable Boxtrolls who are now stars in the Oscar-nominated film The Boxtrolls.

Worse Things Happen at Sea

The people of Ratbridge are going crazy for the amazing miracle medicine, Black Jollop. But disaster strikes when it looks as though the powerful pick-me-up is running out! It's up to Arthur and his friends on board the Nautical Laundry to journey afar to gather the secret ingredient. It's excitement ahoy in this madcap story, full of hilarious and outrageous characters, including the loveable Boxtrolls who are now stars in the Oscar-nominated film The Boxtrolls.

Researching Japanese War Crimes Records Introductory Essays

... Shehui kexue wenxian chubanshe, 2004). I thank Greg Brasher of NARA for alerting me to this fact. Shusaku Endō, The Sea and Poison: A Novel, trans.

Researching Japanese War Crimes Records  Introductory Essays

Japanese war crimes committed in Asia and the Pacific between 1931 and 1945 concerned few Americans in the decades following World War II. Japan’s crimes against Asian peoples had never been a major issue in the postwar United States, and—with the notable exceptions of former U.S. prisoners of war held by the Japanese—even remembrance of Japanese wartime atrocities against Americans dimmed as years passed. American attitudes about Japanese war crimes changed markedly following the 1997 publication of Iris Chang’s The Rape of Nanking.2 Chang’s moving testament to the Chinese victims of the sack of Nanjing in 1937 graphically detailed the horror and scope of the crime and indicted the Japanese government and people for their collective amnesia about the wartime army’s atrocious conduct. The bestselling book spurred a tremendous amount of renewed interest in Japanese wartime conduct in China, Korea, the Philippines, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific. The Rape of Nanking raised many issues that demanded further explanation. Why were the Japanese not punished as severely as the Nazis for their crimes? Did the United States suppress evidence of the criminal responsibility of activity by the emperor to ensure a smoothly running occupation of Japan? Did the U.S. government protect Japanese medical officers in exchange for data on human experimentation? Chang also charged the U.S. government with “inexplicably and irresponsibly” returning confiscated wartime records to Japan before microfilming them, making it impossible to determine the extent of Japan’s guilt.3 Others were convinced that the U.S. government retained highly classified documents that would prove Japanese guilt beyond doubt and implicate the highest levels of Japanese government and society in the crimes. These issues led concerned parties to investigate Japanese wartime records among the holdings at the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in College Park, Maryland, and at other U.S. government agencies. Thorough documentation of Japanese war crimes and criminal activities among these holdings seemed unavailable, leading to speculation of an official cover-up. Suspicions that the U.S. government was deliberately concealing dark secrets were fueled when, instead of finding the records they sought, researchers encountered a card stating the records had been “withdrawn for security reasons,” as well as when they received a notice that requested information could not be located.