The Secret Code Breakers of Central Bureau

This is a rich historical account of a secret and little-understood side of the war, interwoven with lively personalities and personal stories.

The Secret Code Breakers of Central Bureau

A groundbreaking work of Australian military history, The Code-Breakers of Central Bureau tells the story of the country’s significant code-breaking and signals-intelligence achievements during the Second World War. It reveals how Australians built a large and sophisticated intelligence network from scratch, how Australian code-breakers cracked Japanese army and air force codes, and how the code-breakers played a vital role in the battles of Midway, Milne Bay, the Coral Sea, Hollandia, and Leyte. The book also reveals Australian involvement in the shooting down of Admiral Yamamoto near Bougainville in 1943, and how on 14 August 1945, following Japan’s offer of surrender, an Australian intelligence officer established the Allies’ first direct radio contact with Japan since the war had begun. This is a rich historical account of a secret and little-understood side of the war, interwoven with lively personalities and personal stories. It is the story of Australia’s version of Bletchley Park, of talented and dedicated individuals who significantly influenced the course of the Pacific War.

Nabbing Ned Kelly

He's become Australia's Robin Hood, and leader of a colonial Irish resistance. How much of the legend is true? This is the real story of the hunt for the Kelly Gang over two long years.

Nabbing Ned Kelly

David Dufty goes back to the records to uncover the real story of the police officers who pursued the Kelly Gang. This pacey account of the capture of the Kelly Gang reads like a detective story. He lurched through the gun smoke, his head encased in an iron helmet, and started shooting. To the weary police in the cordon around the Glenrowan hotel, he appeared like a monster, or a creature from hell. For over a century, the Ned Kelly legend has grown and grown. He's become Australia's Robin Hood, and leader of a colonial Irish resistance. How much of the legend is true? This is the real story of the hunt for the Kelly Gang over two long years. As gripping as any police procedural, it is an account of poorly trained officers unfamiliar with the terrain, in pursuit of the most dangerous men in the state. By recounting the story from the perspective of the law, David Dufty gets to the heart of the story for the first time and finds answers to many unresolved questions. Why was the gang always one step ahead of the police? Did law-abiding citizens really assist the outlaws? Did the barely literate Ned really write the impassioned Jerilderie Letter? Did the police really persecute the Kelly family? Who was Michael Ward and why is he the real hero in the capture of Ned Kelly?

The Secret Life of an American Codebreaker

Codebreaker Girls Jan Slimming ... The Codebreakers, David Kahn p.545, and www.energy.gov/womenmanhattan-project. ... Fabian thought Nave breached security in his desire to share information with the allied Army Central Bureau, ...

The Secret Life of an American Codebreaker

The Secret Life of an American Codebreaker is the true account of Janice Martin, a college student recruited to the military in 1943, after she was secretly approached by a college professor at Goucher College, a liberal arts establishment for women in Baltimore, USA. Destined for a teaching career, Janice became a prestigious professor of classics at Georgia State University, but how did she spend three years of her secret life during the war working in Washington D.C.’s Top Secret Intelligence? Why was she chosen? How was she chosen? What did she do? Questions everyone asks are answered in this study of not just one but several Second World War codebreakers, male and female. Backed by extensive research, unpublished photographs and recorded interviews, we discover the life of Janice Martin from Baltimore and her Top Secret Ultra role in helping to combat U-boats in the Battle of the Atlantic; the work she and her colleagues undertook in a foundation provided by both British and American Intelligence. From ‘the early days’ to D-Day and beyond, the book includes other hidden figures who were part of this huge wheel of an incredible time in history.

Radio Girl

I was there to interview her about Australia's code-breaking activities during World War II, a topic in which she was ... Secret CodeBreakers of Central Bureau, and wasn't looking for a new project, but when I returned to Canberra I ...

Radio Girl

As you climbed the rickety stairs of an old woolshed at Sydney harbour in 1944, you would hear the thrum of clicks and buzzes. Rows of men and women in uniforms and headsets would be tapping away vigorously at small machines, under the careful watch of their young female trainers. Presiding over the cacophony was a tiny woman, known to everyone as 'Mrs Mac', one of Australia's wartime legends.2 A smart girl from a poor mining town who loved to play with her father's tools, Violet McKenzie became an electrical engineer, a pioneer of radio and a successful businesswoman. As the clouds of war gathered in the 1930s, she defied convention and trained young women in Morse code, foreseeing that their services would soon be sorely needed. Always a champion of women, she was instrumental in getting Australian women into the armed forces. Mrs Mac was adored by the thousands of young women and men she trained, and came to be respected by the defence forces and the public too for her vision and contribution to the war effort. David Dufty brings her story to life in this heartwarming and captivating biography. '[An] incredible and inspiring life... Dufty's new biography captures her unwavering dedication in the face of adversity.' - Professor Genevieve Bell, Australian National University 'A cracking story about the famous Australian radio engineer you've never heard of.' - Dick Smith, entrepreneur and philanthropist

Deception Bay

Jean Bou, MacArthur's Secret Bureau, e story of the Central Bureau General MacArthur's Signals Intelligence Organisation, Australian Military History Publications, Loftus, NSW, 2012. Craig Collie, Code Breakers.

Deception Bay

Deceit is usually wrong, sometimes necessary and often the best course of action DECEPTION BAY continues JP Powell’s magnificent Brisbane wartime saga. American MP Joe Washington, an investigator with the Provost Marshall’s Office, and Australian Rose McAlister are swept back together when she returns to join Central Bureau, General MacArthur’s code-breaking group of eccentrics in ‘Brisbane’s Bletchley Park’. Again and again, Joe is drawn to the Brisbane River. Reports of a man who jumped from a bridge, a code breaker allegedly drowned by suicide, and an arm with an unrecognisable tattoo fished out of the water at the submarine base. Together they follow the clues but are quickly drawn into the city’s dark tank stream, filled with predators and conmen and Joe’s nemesis, corrupt Queensland detective Frank Bischof. ‘Deception Bay reads like a compulsive thriller yet is adorned with an effortless and often breathtaking evocation of a lost Brisbane city. With The Brisbane Line and now Deception Bay, Powell has built two mighty additions to the city’s literary canon.’— Matt Condon ‘Enthralling and intriguing, Deception Bay is a finely layered murder mystery. Immaculately researched and full of great detail, Powell’s work depicts a fascinating side of Brisbane in WWII.’ — Mirandi Riwoe ‘Deception Bay draws the reader into the page and immerses them in the underbelly of 1940s Brisbane.’ ­— Sulari Gentill

The Codebreakers

The Comprehensive History of Secret Communication from Ancient Times to the Internet David Kahn ... under MacArthur, had at its headquarters a communications-intelligence unit called the Central Bureau and in the field a number of ...

The Codebreakers

The magnificent, unrivaled history of codes and ciphers -- how they're made, how they're broken, and the many and fascinating roles they've played since the dawn of civilization in war, business, diplomacy, and espionage -- updated with a new chapter on computer cryptography and the Ultra secret. Man has created codes to keep secrets and has broken codes to learn those secrets since the time of the Pharaohs. For 4,000 years, fierce battles have been waged between codemakers and codebreakers, and the story of these battles is civilization's secret history, the hidden account of how wars were won and lost, diplomatic intrigues foiled, business secrets stolen, governments ruined, computers hacked. From the XYZ Affair to the Dreyfus Affair, from the Gallic War to the Persian Gulf, from Druidic runes and the kaballah to outer space, from the Zimmermann telegram to Enigma to the Manhattan Project, codebreaking has shaped the course of human events to an extent beyond any easy reckoning. Once a government monopoly, cryptology today touches everybody. It secures the Internet, keeps e-mail private, maintains the integrity of cash machine transactions, and scrambles TV signals on unpaid-for channels. David Kahn's The Codebreakers takes the measure of what codes and codebreaking have meant in human history in a single comprehensive account, astonishing in its scope and enthralling in its execution. Hailed upon first publication as a book likely to become the definitive work of its kind, The Codebreakers has more than lived up to that prediction: it remains unsurpassed. With a brilliant new chapter that makes use of previously classified documents to bring the book thoroughly up to date, and to explore the myriad ways computer codes and their hackers are changing all of our lives, The Codebreakers is the skeleton key to a thousand thrilling true stories of intrigue, mystery, and adventure. It is a masterpiece of the historian's art.

Behind the Enigma

David Dufty, The Secret Codebreakers of Central Bureau: how Australia's signals intelligence network helped win the Second World War (Scribe, Melbourne, 2017); Peter Donovan and John Mack, Codebreaking in the 85 86 Pacific (Springer, ...

Behind the Enigma

You know about MI5. You know about MI6. Now uncover the mystery behind Britain's most secretive intelligence agency, in the first ever authorised history of GCHQ. For a hundred years, GCHQ – Government Communications Headquarters – has been at the forefront of innovation in national security and British secret statecraft. Famed for its codebreaking achievements during the Second World War, and essential to the Allied victory, GCHQ also held a critical role in both the Falklands War and Cold War. Today, amidst the growing threats of terrorism and online crime, GCHQ continues to be the UK's leading intelligence, security and cyber agency, and a powerful tool of the British state. Based on unprecedented access to classified archives, Behind the Enigma is the first book to authoritatively tell the entire history of this most unique and enigmatic of organisations – and peer into its future at the heart of the nation's security.

The Bletchley Park Codebreakers

The Central Bureau was able to provide General Douglas MacArthur, the Allied commander, with full details of the Japanese order of battle in New Guinea, greatly aiding his advance. Bletchley Park now began to reinforce the Central ...

The Bletchley Park Codebreakers

The British codebreakers at Bletchley Park are now believed to have shortened the duration of the Second World War by up to two years. During the dark days of 1941, as Britain stood almost alone against the the Nazis, this remarkable achievement seemed impossible. This extraordinary book, originally published as Action This Day, includes descriptions by some of Britain s foremost historians of the work of Bletchley Park, from the breaking ofEnigma and other wartime codes to the invention of modern computing, and its influence on Cold War codebreaking. Crucially, it features personal reminiscences and very human stories of wartime codebreaking from former Bletchley Park codebreakers themselves. This edition includes new material from one of those who was there, making The Bletchley Park Codebreakers compulsive reading.

The Emperor s Codes

Bletchley Park's role in breaking Japan's secret cyphers Michael Smith ... File Pages 52–53 Cooper recollections on Japanese naval air messages from PRO HW4/30 Page 54 Captured air–ground codebook from Central Bureau Technical Records, ...

The Emperor s Codes

The extraordinary wartime exploits of the British codebreakers based at Bletchley Park continue to fascinate and amaze. In The Emperor's Codes Michael Smith tells the story of how Japan's wartime codes were broken, and the consequences for the Second World War. He describes how the Japanese ciphers were broken and the effect on the lives of the codebreakers themselves. Using material from recently declassified British files, privileged access to Australian secret official histories and interviews with British, American and Australian codebreakers, this is the first full account of the critical role played by Bletchley Park and its main outposts around the world.

MacArthur

Australian minesweepers clearing Sio found the 20th Division's codebooks. Soon they were in the hands of MacArthur's code breakers in Brisbane, the secret group known as Central Bureau. Armed with the 20th Division's codebooks, ...

MacArthur

General Douglas MacArthur was one of the most colorful, controversial, and image-conscious military figures of the twentieth century. This military biography in photos captures the spirit of the man and his legend in hundreds of historical images. • Focuses on the Pacific theater of World War II • Features his decorated service in World War I, postwar duties in Japan, and role in the Korean War • Compelling reference for military history fans, scholars, and anyone interested in this legendary military figure

Code Breaking in the Pacific

No explicit mention of code breaking was made. ... tipped off the Japanese high command that somehow our Navy had secured and broken the secret code of the Japanese Navy. ... 16The early Central Bureau minutes survive in NAA file SI/10.

Code Breaking in the Pacific

This book reveals the historical context and the evolution of the technically complex Allied Signals Intelligence (Sigint) activity against Japan from 1920 to 1945. It traces the all-important genesis and development of the cryptanalytic techniques used to break the main Japanese Navy code (JN-25) and the Japanese Army’s Water Transport Code during WWII. This is the first book to describe, explain and analyze the code breaking techniques developed and used to provide this intelligence, thus closing the sole remaining gap in the published accounts of the Pacific War. The authors also explore the organization of cryptographic teams and issues of security, censorship, and leaks. Correcting gaps in previous research, this book illustrates how Sigint remained crucial to Allied planning throughout the war. It helped direct the advance to the Philippines from New Guinea, the sea battles and the submarine onslaught on merchant shipping. Written by well-known authorities on the history of cryptography and mathematics, Code Breaking in the Pacific is designed for cryptologists, mathematicians and researchers working in communications security. Advanced-level students interested in cryptology, the history of the Pacific War, mathematics or the history of computing will also find this book a valuable resource.

From Pearl Harbor to Hiroshima

Thus the entire cryptographic library of the 20th Division, less covers, passed into Central Bureau's hands. ... US Army codebreakers read the Japanese Army's four-digit cipher — its most important top-secret messages – with clarity and ...

From Pearl Harbor to Hiroshima

'The most significant issue that Dockrill addresses is that of how Japan views the war in retrospect, a question which not only tells us a lot about how events were seen in Japan in 1941 but is also, a matter still of importance in contemporary East Asian politics.' Antony Best, London School of Economics This multi-authored work, edited by Saki Dockrill, is an original, unique, and controversial interpretation of the Second World War in Asia and the Pacific. Dr Dockrill, the author of Britain's Policy for West German Rearmament, has skilfully converted the proceedings of an international conference held in London into a stimulating and readable account of the Pacific War. This is a valuable contribution to our knowledge of the subject.

Allied and Axis Signals Intelligence in World War II

For a description of the destruction of Japanese forces resulting from this Sigint victory see Edward J. Drea, MacArthur's Ultra: Code breaking in the WarAgainstJapan (Lawrence: U. of Kansas Press 1992) pp.61-2. 38. HCC, 'Central Bureau ...

Allied and Axis Signals Intelligence in World War II

The importance of codebreaking and signals intelligence in the diplomacy and military operations of World War II is reflected in this study of the cryptanalysts, not only of the US and Britain, but all the Allies. The codebreaking war was a global conflict in which many countries were active. The contributions reveal that, for the Axis as well as the Allies, success in the signals war often depended upon close collaboration among alliance partners.

The Other Greek

7 This information comes from codebreaker Nigel de Grey (1886–1951), see National Archives HW 4/30. ... DavidDufty,The SecretCode-Breakers of CentralBureau:HowAustralia'sSignals-intelligenceNetworkHelpedWinthePacificWar,Brun- swick: ...

The Other Greek

"In The Other Greek, Arthur Cooper offers a captivating and unorthodox introduction to the world of the Chinese script through the medium of poetry, explaining the structure, meaning and cultural significance of each character. Written nearly half a century ago, and now published posthumously, the book argues that the role of Chinese writing was analogous to the influence of Greek civilization on Western culture. Chinese is the Greek of the Far East, 'the other Greek'! Originally a cryptanalyst, Cooper uses his professional--and distinctly non-academic--training to analyse Chinese characters and points out a series of unacknowledged associations between them. Ultimately, he aims to initiate the reader with no prior knowledge of the language into Chinese writing and poetry"--

Codebreakers Victory

While much of this information came from agents and spies, codebreakers also played their part. ... of intelligence reports delivered to the Moscow Central Bureau, which directed agents and volunteer informants, ...

Codebreakers  Victory

With exclusive interviews, a Signal Corps veteran tells the full story of how cryptography helped defeat the Axis powers, at Bletchley Park and beyond. For years, the story of the World War II codebreakers was kept a crucial state secret. Even Winston Churchill, himself a great advocate of Britain’s cryptologic program, purposefully minimized their achievements in his history books. Now, though, after decades have passed, the true scope of the British and American cryptographers’ role in the war has come to light. It was a role key to the Allied victory. From the Battle of Britain to the Pacific front to the panzer divisions in Africa, superior cryptography gave the Allies a decisive advantage over the Axis generals. Military intelligence made a significant difference in battle after battle. In Codebreakers’ Victory, veteran cryptographer Hervie Haufler takes readers behind the scenes in this fascinating underground world of ciphers and decoders. This broad view represents the first comprehensive account of codebreaking during World War II. Haufler pulls together years of research, exclusive access to top secret files, and personal interviews to craft a captivating must-read for anyone interested in the behind-the-front intellect and perseverance that went into beating the Nazis and Japan.

Play Among Books

3292 DUFTY , DAVID , The Secret Code - Breakers of Central Bureau : How Australia's SignalsIntelligence Network Helped Win the Pacific War 3293 DUGARD , JAYCEE , A Stolen Life : A Memoir 3294 DUGATKIN , LEE ALAN , The Prince of ...

Play Among Books

How does coding change the way we think about architecture? This question opens up an important research perspective. In this book, Miro Roman and his AI Alice_ch3n81 develop a playful scenario in which they propose coding as the new literacy of information. They convey knowledge in the form of a project model that links the fields of architecture and information through two interwoven narrative strands in an “infinite flow” of real books. Focusing on the intersection of information technology and architectural formulation, the authors create an evolving intellectual reflection on digital architecture and computer science.

Code Breakers and Spies of World War I

1909 The British government founds the Secret Service Bureau . – 1914 Archduke Ferdinand is assassinated, sparking World War I . The British begin recruiting cryptographers to work in Room 40 . Intercepted intelligence helps the Germans ...

Code Breakers and Spies of World War I

The world's great economic powers aligned into two opposing forces in World War I. Although still in its infancy by modern standards at the onset of the conflict, intelligence gathering and espionage would ultimately tip the balance. Readers learn how new technology exploded and resulted in developments in cryptography and surveillance as both sides raced to crack the codes and win the war.

Douglas MacArthur

... secret codes left at 503–4 XI Corps defense of 511 Akin, Spencer, 328,436 Bataan Gang member 300 Central Bureau codebreakers and, 436, 462, 465,479,491, 503–4,519 escape from Corregidor, 396, 407 as USAFFEGHQ signal officer,300,311, ...

Douglas MacArthur

A new, definitive life of an American icon, the visionary general who led American forces through three wars and foresaw his nation’s great geopolitical shift toward the Pacific Rim—from the Pulitzer Prize finalist and bestselling author of Gandhi & Churchill Douglas MacArthur was arguably the last American public figure to be worshipped unreservedly as a national hero, the last military figure to conjure up the romantic stirrings once evoked by George Armstrong Custer and Robert E. Lee. But he was also one of America’s most divisive figures, a man whose entire career was steeped in controversy. Was he an avatar or an anachronism, a brilliant strategist or a vainglorious mountebank? Drawing on a wealth of new sources, Arthur Herman delivers a powerhouse biography that peels back the layers of myth—both good and bad—and exposes the marrow of the man beneath. MacArthur’s life spans the emergence of the United States Army as a global fighting force. Its history is to a great degree his story. The son of a Civil War hero, he led American troops in three monumental conflicts—World War I, World War II, and the Korean War. Born four years after Little Bighorn, he died just as American forces began deploying in Vietnam. Herman’s magisterial book spans the full arc of MacArthur’s journey, from his elevation to major general at thirty-eight through his tenure as superintendent of West Point, field marshal of the Philippines, supreme ruler of postwar Japan, and beyond. More than any previous biographer, Herman shows how MacArthur’s strategic vision helped shape several decades of U.S. foreign policy. Alone among his peers, he foresaw the shift away from Europe, becoming the prophet of America’s destiny in the Pacific Rim. Here, too, is a vivid portrait of a man whose grandiose vision of his own destiny won him enemies as well as acolytes. MacArthur was one of the first military heroes to cultivate his own public persona—the swashbuckling commander outfitted with Ray-Ban sunglasses, riding crop, and corncob pipe. Repeatedly spared from being killed in battle—his soldiers nicknamed him “Bullet Proof”—he had a strong sense of divine mission. “Mac” was a man possessed, in the words of one of his contemporaries, of a “supreme and almost mystical faith that he could not fail.” Yet when he did, it was on an epic scale. His willingness to defy both civilian and military authority was, Herman shows, a lifelong trait—and it would become his undoing. Tellingly, MacArthur once observed, “Sometimes it is the order one disobeys that makes one famous.” To capture the life of such an outsize figure in one volume is no small achievement. With Douglas MacArthur, Arthur Herman has set a new standard for untangling the legacy of this American legend. Praise for Douglas MacArthur “This is revisionist history at its best and, hopefully, will reopen a debate about the judgment of history and MacArthur’s place in history.”—New York Journal of Books “Unfailingly evocative . . . close to an epic . . . More than a biography, it is a tale of a time in the past almost impossible to contemplate today as having taken place, with MacArthur himself as a figure perhaps too remote to understand, but all the more important to encounter.”—The New Criterion “With Douglas MacArthur: American Warrior, the prolific and talented historian Arthur Herman has delivered an expertly rendered, compulsively readable account that does full justice to MacArthur’s monumental achievements without slighting his equally monumental flaws.”—Commentary

The Secret Code Breakers of Central Bureau

This is a rich historical account of a secret and little-understood side of the war, interwoven with lively personalities and personal stories.

The Secret Code Breakers of Central Bureau

A groundbreaking work of Australian military history, The Code-Breakers of Central Bureautells the story of the country's significant code-breaking and signals-intelligence achievements during the Second World War. It reveals how Australians built a large and sophisticated intelligence network from scratch, how Australian code-breakers cracked Japanese army and air force codes, and how the code-breakers played a vital role in the battles of Midway, Milne Bay, the Coral Sea, Hollandia, and Leyte. The book also reveals Australian involvement in the shooting down of Admiral Yamamoto near Bougainville in 1943, and how on 14 August 1945, following Japan's offer of surrender, an Australian intelligence officer established the Allies' first direct radio contact with Japan since the war had begun. This is a rich historical account of a secret and little-understood side of the war, interwoven with lively personalities and personal stories. It is the story of Australia's version of Bletchley Park, of talented and dedicated individuals who significantly influenced the course of the Pacific War.

India Pakistan and the Secret Jihad

... Characteristics of New Improvised Explosive Device (New Delhi: Central Bureau of Investigations, undated). ... For a comprehensive account of the history of codes and code-breaking, see Simon Singh, The Code Book: The Science of ...

India  Pakistan and the Secret Jihad

India, Pakistan and the Secret Jihad explores the history of jihadist violence in Kashmir, and argues that the violent conflict which exploded after 1990 was not a historical discontinuity, but, rather, an escalation of what was by then a five-decade old secret war. Praveen Swami addresses three key issues: the history of jihadist violence in Jammu and Kashmir, which is examined as it evolved from 1947-48 onwards the impact of the secret jihad on Indian policy-making on Jammu and Kashmir, and its influence on political life within the state why the jihad in Jammu and Kashmir acquired such intensity in 1990. This new work will be of much interest to students of the India-Pakistan conflict, South Asian politics and security studies in general.