The Selected Letters of Elizabeth Stoddard

In response to the resurgence of interest in American novelist, poet, short-story writer, and newspaper correspondent Elizabeth Stoddard (1823–1902), whose best-known work is The Morgesons (1862), Jennifer Putzi and Elizabeth Stockton ...

The Selected Letters of Elizabeth Stoddard

In response to the resurgence of interest in American novelist, poet, short-story writer, and newspaper correspondent Elizabeth Stoddard (1823–1902), whose best-known work is The Morgesons (1862), Jennifer Putzi and Elizabeth Stockton spent years locating, reading, and sorting through more than 700 letters scattered across eighteen different archives, finally choosing eighty-four letters to annotate and include in this collection. By presenting complete, annotated transcripts, The Selected Letters provides a fascinating introduction to this compelling writer, while at the same time complicating earlier representations of her as either a literary handmaiden to her at-the-time more famous husband, the poet Richard Henry Stoddard, or worse, as the “Pythoness” whose difficult personality made her a fickle and unreasonable friend. The Stoddards belonged to New York's vibrant, close-knit literary and artistic circles. Among their correspondents were both family members and friends including writers and editors such as Julia Caroline Ripley Dorr, Rufus Griswold, James Russell Lowell, Caroline Healey Dall, Julian Hawthorne, William Dean Howells, Helen Hunt Jackson, Edmund Clarence Stedman, and Margaret Sweat. An innovative and unique writer, Stoddard eschewed the popular sentimentality of her time even while exploring the emotional territory of relations between the sexes. Her writing—in both her published fiction and her personal letters—is surprisingly modern and psychologically dense. The letters are highly readable, lively, and revealing, even to readers who know little of her literary output or her life. As scholars of epistolarity have recently argued, letters provide more than just a biographical narrative; they also should be understood as aesthetic performances themselves. The correspondence provides a sense of Stoddard as someone who understood letter writing as a distinct and important literary genre, making this collection particularly well suited for new conceptualizations of the epistolary genre.

Handbook of the American Novel of the Nineteenth Century

The Selected Letters of Elizabeth Stoddard. Eds. Jennifer Putzi and Elizabeth Stockton. Iowa City: U of Iowa P, 2012. 30–35. Stoddard, Elizabeth. “Letter to Edmund Clarence Stedman, November 18, [1887].” The Selected Letters of ...

Handbook of the American Novel of the Nineteenth Century

This handbook offers students and researchers a compact introduction to the nineteenth-century American novel in the light of current debates, theoretical concepts, and critical methodologies. The volume turns to the nineteenth century as a formative era in American literary history, a time that saw both the rise of the novel as a genre, and the emergence of an independent, confident American culture. A broad range of concise essays by European and American scholars demonstrates how some of America‘s most well-known and influential novels responded to and participated in the radical transformations that characterized American culture between the early republic and the age of imperial expansion. Part I consists of 7 systematic essays on key historical and critical frameworks ― including debates aboutrace and citizenship, transnationalism, environmentalism and print culture, as well as sentimentalism, romance and the gothic, realism and naturalism. Part II provides 22 essays on individual novels, each combining an introduction to relevant cultural contexts with a fresh close reading and the discussion of critical perspectives shaped by literary and cultural theory.

Selected Letters of Bayard Taylor

Possibly Matthew Vassar ( 1792–1868 ) , philanthropist and founder of Vassar College , opened in 1865 . de 103 To Elizabeth Stoddard ' St. Petersburg . May 7 , 1863 . My dear Lizzie : Marie sent me your letter from Gotha a week ago ...

Selected Letters of Bayard Taylor

Taylor was one of the most famous persons of his day and carried on a wide correspondence. His ambition and thirst for fame are recurrent themes in these letters, as well as his fears and uncertainties. He emerges as a highly talented writer who succeeded by force of will.

A History of Nineteenth Century American Women s Poetry

Lynn Mahoney, Elizabeth Stoddard and the Boundaries of Bourgeois Culture (New York: Routledge, 2004), xii–xv. A list of Stoddard's published ... The Selected Letters of Elizabeth Stoddard, Jennifer Putzi and Elizabeth Stockton (eds.) ...

A History of Nineteenth Century American Women s Poetry

A History of Nineteenth-Century American Women's Poetry is the first book to construct a coherent history of the field and focus entirely on women's poetry of the period. With contributions from some of the most prominent scholars of nineteenth-century American literature, it explores a wide variety of authors, texts, and methodological approaches. Organized into three chronological sections, the essays examine multiple genres of poetry, consider poems circulated in various manuscript and print venues, and propose alternative ways of narrating literary history. From these essays, a rich story emerges about a diverse poetics that was once immensely popular but has since been forgotten. This History confirms that the field has advanced far beyond the recovery of select individual poets. It will be an invaluable resource for students, teachers, and critics of both the literature and the history of this era.

The Oxford Handbook of Edgar Allen Poe

Elizabeth Stoddard, The Selected Letters of Elizabeth Stoddard, ed. Jennifer Putzi and Elizabeth Stockton (Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2012), 116. R. H. Stoddard, Recollections, Personal and Literary (New York: A.S. Barnes and ...

The Oxford Handbook of Edgar Allen Poe

No American author of the early 19th century enjoys a larger international audience than Edgar Allan Poe. Widely translated, read, and studied, he occupies an iconic place in global culture. Such acclaim would have gratified Poe, who deliberately wrote for "the world at large" and mocked the provincialism of strictly nationalistic themes. Partly for this reason, early literary historians cast Poe as an outsider, regarding his dark fantasies as extraneous to American life and experience. Only in the 20th century did Poe finally gain a prominent place in the national canon. Changing critical approaches have deepened our understanding of Poe's complexity and revealed an author who defies easy classification. New models of interpretation have excited fresh debates about his essential genius, his subversive imagination, his cultural insight, and his ultimate impact, urging an expansive reconsideration of his literary achievement. Edited by leading experts J. Gerald Kennedy and Scott Peeples, this volume presents a sweeping reexamination of Poe's work. Forty-five distinguished scholars address Poe's troubled life and checkered career as a "magazinist," his poetry and prose, and his reviews, essays, opinions, and marginalia. The chapters provide fresh insights into Poe's lasting impact on subsequent literature, music, art, comics, and film and illuminate his radical conception of the universe, science, and the human mind. Wide-ranging and thought-provoking, this Handbook reveals a thoroughly modern Poe, whose timeless fables of peril and loss will continue to attract new generations of readers and scholars.

Humbug

See also Mary Alice Wyman, Two American Pioneers: Seba Smith and Elizabeth Oakes Smith (New York: Columbia ... Putzi and Elizabeth Stockton, eds., The Selected Letters of Elizabeth Stoddard (Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2012).

Humbug

Approximately 300 daily and weekly newspapers flourished in New York before the Civil War. A majority of these newspapers, even those that proclaimed independence of party, were motivated by political conviction and often local conflicts. Their editors and writers jockeyed for government office and influence. Political infighting and their related maneuvers dominated the popular press, and these political and economic agendas led in turn to exploitation of art and art exhibitions. Humbug traces the relationships, class animosities, gender biases, and racial projections that drove the terms of art criticism, from the emergence of the penny press to the Civil War. The inexpensive “penny” papers that appeared in the 1830s relied on advertising to survive. Sensational stories, satire, and breaking news were the key to selling papers on the streets. Coverage of local politicians, markets, crime, and personalities, including artists and art exhibitions, became the penny papers’ lifeblood. These cheap papers, though unquestionably part of the period’s expanding capitalist economy, offered socialists, working-class men, bohemians, and utopianists a forum in which they could propose new models for American art and society and tear down existing ones. Arguing that the politics of the antebellum press affected the meaning of American art in ways that have gone unrecognized, Humbug covers the changing politics and rhetoric of this criticism. Author Wendy Katz demonstrates how the penny press’s drive for a more egalitarian society affected the taste and values that shaped art, and how the politics of their art criticism changed under pressure from nativists, abolitionists, and expansionists. Chapters explore James Gordon Bennett’s New York Herald and its attack on aristocratic monopolies on art; the penny press’s attack on the American Art-Union, an influential corporation whose Board purchased artworks from living artists, exhibited them in a free gallery, and then distributed them in an annual five-dollar lottery; exposés of the fraudulent trade in Old Masters works; and the efforts of socialists, freethinkers, and bohemians to reject the authority of the past.

American Culture Canons and the Case of Elizabeth Stoddard

The Selected Tales and Sketches. New York: Penguin, 1987: 246–58. 1. The House of Seven Gables. 1851. Boston: Houghton Mif®in, 1883. 1. The House of the Seven Gables. New York: Penguin, 1986. 1. Letters: 1853–56.

American Culture  Canons  and the Case of Elizabeth Stoddard

Elizabeth Stoddard was a gifted writer of fiction, poetry, and journalism; successfully published within her own lifetime; esteemed by such writers as William Dean Howells and Nathaniel Hawthorne; and situated at the epicenter of New York's literary world. Nonetheless, she has been almost excluded from literary memory and importance. This book seeks to understand why. By reconsidering Stoddard’s life and work and her current marginal status in the evolving canon of American literary studies, it raises important questions about women’s writing in the 19th century and canon formation in the 20th century. Essays in this study locate Stoddard in the context of her contemporaries, such as Dickinson and Hawthorne, while others situate her work in the context of major 19th-century cultural forces and issues, among them the Civil War and Reconstruction, race and ethnicity, anorexia and female invalidism, nationalism and localism, and incest. One essay examines the development of Stoddard's work in the light of her biography, and others probe her stylistic and philosophic originality, the journalistic roots of her voice, and the elliptical themes of her short fiction. Stoddard’s lifelong project to articulate the nature and dynamics of woman's subjectivity, her challenging treatment of female appetite and will, and her depiction of the complex and often ambivalent relationships that white middle-class women had to their domestic spaces are also thoughtfully considered. The editors argue that the neglect of Elizabeth Stoddard's contribution to American literature is a compelling example of the contingency of critical values and the instability of literary history. This study asks the question, “Will Stoddard endure?” Will she continue to drift into oblivion or will a new generation of readers and critics secure her tenuous legacy?

Selected Letters of Hamlin Garland

1–3 , Dolores Marbourg Bacon contributed a profusely illustrated article , with facsimiles and transcriptions of Booth's letters to the novelist Elizabeth Drew Stoddard ( 1822–1902 ) and her husband , the poet Richard Henry Stoddard ...

Selected Letters of Hamlin Garland

Hamlin Garland, a Pulitzer Prize-winner and author of more than forty books, was a central figure in American literary life for half a century. He was intimately involved with many of the major literary, social, and artistic movements in American culture, and his extensive correspondence with the intellectual leaders of American culture was almost unparalleled in scope. This volume brings together a rich, representative sample of Garland?s letters. They are addressed to an impressive roster of individuals: Samuel Clemens, William Dean Howells, Walt Whitman, Zona Gale, Theodore Roosevelt, Van Wyck Brooks, Howard Mumford Jones, Brander Matthews, Stephen Crane, George Washington Cable, and many others. The letters touch on an equally broad range of subjects, from the U.S. government?s reprehensible treatment of Native Americans to environmental issues to the major literary figures and controversies of Garland?s day. Frank, opinionated, and wide-ranging, Garland?s letters provide a valuable and entertaining portrait of American cultural and intellectual life in the years between 1890 and 1940.

Toward a Female Genealogy of Transcendentalism

Elizabeth Povinelli, “Sex in a Secular Age: Can Sex Be a Minor Form of Spitting?” in The Immanent Frame: Secularism, Religion, ... The Selected Letters of Elizabeth Stoddard, ed. Jennifer Putzi and Elizabeth Stockton (Iowa City: Univ.

Toward a Female Genealogy of Transcendentalism

The first large-scale, collaborative study of women s voices and their vital role in the American transcendentalist movement. Many of its seventeen distinguished scholars work from newly recovered archives, and all offer fresh readings of understudied topics and texts, shedding light on female contributions."

The Bohemian Republic

236 Jennifer Putzi & Elizabeth Stockton ( eds.), The Selected Letters of Elizabeth Stoddard ( Iowa, 2012), p. 44. 237 ' Thoughts and Things' suggests a tribute to a feminist precursor, Margaret Fuller, whose dispatches to the New York ...

The Bohemian Republic

In the mid-nineteenth century successive cultural Bohemias were proclaimed in Paris, London, New York, and Melbourne. Focusing on networks and borders as the central modes of analysis, this book charts for the first time Bohemia’s cross-Channel, transatlantic, and trans-Pacific migrations, locating its creative expressions and social practices within a global context of ideas and action. Though the story of Parisian Bohemia has been comprehensively told, much less is known of its Anglophone translations. The Bohemian Republic offers a radical reinterpretation of the phenomenon, as the neglected lives and works of British, Irish, American, and Australian Bohemians are reassessed, the transnational networks of Bohemia are rediscovered, the presence and influence of women in Bohemia is reclaimed, and Bohemia’s relationship with the marketplace is reconsidered. Bohemia emerges as a marginal network which exerted a paradoxically powerful influence on the development of popular culture, in the vanguard of material, social and aesthetic innovations in literature, art, journalism, and theatre. Underpinned by extensive and original archival research, the book repopulates the concept of Bohemianism with layers of the networked voices, expressions, ideas, people, places, and practices that made up its constituent social, imagined, and interpretive communities. The reader is brought closer than ever to the heart of Bohemia, a shadowy world inhabited by the rebels of the mid-nineteenth century.

Selected Letters

769 , Stearns , Mrs. William F. , 350 ; see letter 985 no . 772 Toplift , Sir Stephen , 216–217 Stebbins , Milan Cyrus , 53 , 350 Torricelli , Evangelista , 321 Stirling , Mary Elizabeth , 87 Tracy , Sarah , 10 , 58 , 351 Stoddard ...

Selected Letters

The famous American poet as a person and a literary figure is seen through sensitive and expressive correspondence that spans her life from childhood to maturity

Letters and Cultural Transformations in the United States 1760 1860

She is c rrently working on an edition of Elizabeth Stoddard s letters and a st dy of Adam Kessel, an early American silent film prod cer. ... He is editor with Sharon M. Harris of Mercy Otis Warren: Selected Letters (Georgia, 2009).

Letters and Cultural Transformations in the United States  1760 1860

This volume illustrates the significance of epistolarity as a literary phenomenon intricately interwoven with eighteenth- and nineteenth-century cultural developments. Rejecting the common categorization of letters as primarily private documents, this collection of essays demonstrates the genre's persistent public engagements with changing cultural dynamics of the revolutionary, early republican, and antebellum eras. Sections of the collection treat letters' implication in transatlanticism, authorship, and reform movements as well as the politics and practices of editing letters. The wide range of authors considered include Mercy Otis Warren, Charles Brockden Brown, members of the Emerson and Peabody families, Margaret Fuller, Elizabeth Stoddard, Catherine Brown, John Brown, and Harriet Jacobs. The volume is particularly relevant for researchers in U.S. literature and history, as well as women's writing and periodical studies. This dynamic collection offers scholars an exemplary template of new approaches for exploring an understudied yet critically important literary genre.

Reclaiming Authorship

“Freedom and Ballgowns: Elizabeth Keckley and the Work of Domesticity.” Arizona Quarterly 57 (winter 2001): 45-87. ... The Selected Letters of Louisa May Alcott. ... In American Culture, Canons, and the Case of Elizabeth Stoddard, ed.

Reclaiming Authorship

There was, in the nineteenth century, a distinction made between "writers" and "authors," Susan S. Williams notes, the former defined as those who composed primarily from mere experience or observation rather than from the unique genius or imagination of the latter. If women were more often cast as writers than authors by the literary establishment, there also emerged in magazines, advice books, fictional accounts, and letters a specific model of female authorship, one that valorized "natural" feminine traits such as observation and emphasis on detail, while also representing the distance between amateur writing and professional authorship. Attending to biographical and cultural contexts and offering fresh readings of literary works, Reclaiming Authorship focuses on the complex ways writers such as Maria S. Cummins, Louisa May Alcott, Elizabeth Keckley, Mary Abigail Dodge, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, and Constance Fenimore Woolson put this model of female authorship into practice. Williams shows how it sometimes intersected with prevailing notions of male authorship and sometimes diverged from them, and how it is often precisely those moments of divergence when authorship was reclaimed by women. The current trend to examine "women writers" rather than "authors" marks a full rotation of the circle, and "writers" can indeed be the more capacious term, embracing producers of everything from letters and diaries to published books. Yet certain nineteenth-century women made particular efforts to claim the title "author," Williams demonstrates, and we miss something of significance by ignoring their efforts.

Selected Letters of Nathaniel Hawthorne

NH's letter may have been solicited for a revised edition of the work that was never published . For NH's inaccuracies in this letter , see CE , 18 : 522n . TO ELIZABETH B. STODDARD Concord , Jany 26th 1863 1 My dear Mrs. Stoddard ...

Selected Letters of Nathaniel Hawthorne

This book is the first-ever selected edition of Nathaniel Hawthorne's letters--169 personal letters and eight letters written while Nathaniel Hawthorne was an American consul. Myerson carefully selected letters focusing on Hawthorne's relationship with famous people of the day: letters written to his wife, Sophia; letters describing everyday life in Salem, Boston, Concord, Britain, France, and Italy; letters in which Hawthorne comments on contemporary literature and his career as an author; and letters that reveal Hawthorne's thoughts and beliefs. Myerson's single-volume Selected Letters of Nathaniel Hawthorne is a welcome addition to the twenty-three-volume Centenary Edition of the Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne (OSU Press)

Writing for Immortality

LMA to Mrs. A. D. Moshier, April 6, [1878], in The Selected Letters of Louisa May Alcott, ed. ... 7; Sandra Zagarell, “Legacy Profile: Elizabeth Drew Barstow Stoddard (1823–1902),” Legacy 8 (spring 1991): 39– 49; Lawrence Buell and ...

Writing for Immortality

Although these women were encouraged by the democratic ideals implicit in such concepts, they were equally discouraged by lingering prejudices about their applicability to women.

The Morgesons and Other Writings Published and Unpublished

Elizabeth Stoddard's selected Poems are published in August by Houghton Mifflin, partly because W. D. Howells praise of ... Congratulatory letters by Arthur Conan Doyle, Edmund Gosse, Howells, Charles Eliot Norton, and others are read; ...

 The Morgesons  and Other Writings  Published and Unpublished

"Stoddard was, next to Melville and Hawthorne, the most strikingly original voice in the mid-nineteenth-century American novel, a voice . . . that ought to gain a more sympathetic and perceptive hearing in our time than in her own."—from the Introduction The centerpiece of this volume is The Morgesons (1862), one of the few outstanding feminist bildungsromanae of that century. Additional selections include arresting short stories and provocative journalistic essays/reviews, plus a number of letters and manuscript journals that have never before been published. The texts are fully edited and documented.

Making the America of Art

Lisa Radinovsky argues that Elizabeth Stoddard came to a similar conclusion in her own struggle with the label of “genius. ... A wealth of biographical information is available about Alcott: the Introductions to the Selected Letters of ...

Making the  America of Art

"Making the "America of Art" demonstrates that beginning in the 1850s, women writers challenged the terms of the Scottish Common Sense philosophy, which had made artistic endeavors acceptable in the new Republic by subordinating aesthetic motivation to moral and educational goals. Harriet Beecher Stowe and Augusta Jane Evans drew on Ruskin to argue for the creation of a religiously based national aesthetic. In the postbellum years Louisa May Alcott, Rebecca Harding Davis, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, and Constance Fenimore Woolson continued the process in a series of writings that revolved around three central areas of concern: the place of the popular in the realm of high art; the role of the genius; and the legacy of the Civil War." "Sofer significantly revises the history of 19th-century American women's authorship by detailing the gradual process that produced women writers wholly identified with literary high culture at the century's end."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Nineteenth century Literature

24 The fact that Stoddard bewails her lack of rhetorical order — that she , too , as a reader of her own work , feels ... 23 Bayard Taylor , letter to Elizabeth Stoddard , 21 November 1862 , in Selected Letters of Bayard Taylor , ed .

Nineteenth century Literature


Bayard Taylor

Letter to Bayard Taylor, November 18, 1866. ... The Selected Letters of John Greenleaf Whittier. 3 vols. Edited by John B. Pickard. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University ... In American Culture, Canons, and the Case of Elizabeth Stoddard.

Bayard Taylor

This work is the first book-length study of the fascinating and influential American writer, Bayard Taylor, in forty years. This critical reconsideration of Taylor’s life and works demonstrates his importance for scholars of nineteenth-century American literature and history, gender and queer studies, and diplomatic history.

The Cambridge Companion to Nineteenth Century American Women s Writing

In the short story “ Lemorne versus Huell , ” published during the Civil War , Elizabeth Stoddard reveals the marriage contract to be a form of ... The Letters of Abigail and John : Selected Letters of the Adams Family , 17621784 , ed .

The Cambridge Companion to Nineteenth Century American Women s Writing

A 2001 Companion providing an overview of the history of writing by women in nineteenth-century America.