Metanoia (Repentance): A Major Theme of the Gospel of Matthew

Metanoia (Repentance): A Major Theme of the Gospel of Matthew

Matthew describes the beginning of Jesus’s ministry with the summary words, “μετανοεῖτε (repent/turn), for the kingdom of heaven is at hand” (3:2; 4:17). Why does Matthew use this command, μετανοεῖτε, at the beginning of his ministry, and how does it relate to the rest of the Gospel? What do μετανοέω and μετάνοια mean? Scholars have stated that μετανοέω in 4:17 has critical value for understanding Matthew because the verse functions as a summary statement (or key phrase) of Jesus’s public ministry and teaching. This book argues the thematic significance of μετάνοια (turning/repentance) in the Gospel of Matthew. The lexical idea of μετανοέω and μετάνοια involves a turning of mind (or heart, will, thinking) and behavior, and so in turn of one’s whole being and life. This opening commandment of turning (μετανοέω), especially the concept, the essence, and the contents is fully revealed throughout the body of Matthew in various ways. Discipleship, the language of righteousness, doing the will of God, changing one’s heart and mind, the Great Commission, and Matthean soteriological theme convey the essence of μετάνοια and the contents of the fruit worthy of μετάνοια(3:2, 8; 4:17). The five major teaching blocks (5–7; 10; 13; 18; 23–25) teach the theme and the content of μετάνοια.

The Sermon on the Mount and Human Flourishing

A Theological Commentary

The Sermon on the Mount and Human Flourishing

The Sermon on the Mount, one of the most influential portions of the Bible, is the most studied and commented upon portion of the Christian Scriptures. Every Christian generation turns to it for insight and guidance. In this volume, a recognized expert on the Gospels shows that the Sermon on the Mount offers a clear window into understanding God's work in Christ. Jonathan Pennington provides a historical, theological, and literary commentary on the Sermon and explains how this text offers insight into God's plan for human flourishing. As Pennington explores the literary dimensions and theological themes of this famous passage, he situates the Sermon in dialogue with the Jewish and Greek virtue traditions and the philosophical-theological question of human flourishing. He also relates the Sermon's theological themes to contemporary issues such as ethics, philosophy, and economics.

Theology and Human Flourishing

Essays in Honor of Timothy J. Gorringe

Theology and Human Flourishing

This collection of essays is a celebration of the work of Timothy Gorringe. Like his theology, it is animated by a delighted and critical engagement with the diverse facets of human social life, and by a passionate concern to wrestle with the Bible and the Christian tradition in pursuit of human flourishing. The built environment, politics, education, art: these essays by leading Christian theologians ask what it means for Christian theology to concern itself with, to immerse itself in, and to risk critical commentary on, each of these and more. The collection follows the same rhythm that animates Gorringe's work: insistent attention to the Christian tradition in the light of the particular contexts where human flourishing is imagined, fought for, embodied and betrayed; and a critical, constructive and celebratory examination of those contexts in the light of the Christian tradition. The contributions are very diverse, touching on everything from city life to human curiosity, poverty to genocide--but they are united by a passion to make theological sense of human flourishing.

A Thicker Jesus

Incarnational Discipleship in a Secular Age

A Thicker Jesus

A groundbreaking argument for recovering Jesus for Christian ethics.

The Problems of Theology

The Problems of Theology

Faculties of theology are a traditional feature of most western European universities, yet in colleges of education, schools and in some newer universities the subject is studied, if at all, under the heading of 'religious studies'. Taking the question 'Is there such a subject?' as his point of departure, the author sets out to explore the relation between theology and the broader field of religious studies. Theology primarily means 'rational talk about God', but the word is used in other wider and looser senses as well. Mr Hebblethwaite discusses in what ways it is possible for non-believers to engage in theology, and stresses the need for all to pursue the subject openly and self-critically in a religiously pluralist world. Criteria for truth-claims in religion and the problem of revelation are among the topics examined. In the course of his study the author looks at the relationship between theology and a number of adjacent subjects: psychology and the social sciences, philosophy, history and ethics.

Proverbs and Ecclesiastes

A Theological Commentary on the Bible

Proverbs and Ecclesiastes

In this new volume in the Belief series, Amy Plantinga Pauw reveals how the biblical books of Proverbs and Ecclesiastes, while often overlooked, are surprisingly relevant for Christian faith today. Both biblical books probe everyday human experiences. They speak to those who seek meaning and purpose in an uncertain world and encourage us to look for God's presence in human life, not in divine visions or messages. They show openness to wisdom insights from many sources, urging us to find the commonalities and connections of our wisdom with those of our religious neighbors. Ultimately, these books affirm that true wisdom, whatever its human source, comes from God. Pauw includes reflections for preaching and teaching throughout her study.

The Genesis and Ethos of the Market

The Genesis and Ethos of the Market

A discussion of the anthropological roots of the market, tracing its development using the history of ideas and cultures as well as simple game theory. In his analysis of market ethics Bruni calls for a reconsideration of some of the central tenets of modern political economy, and the need for a new spirit of capitalism.

Matthew

Matthew

The Texts @ Contexts series gathers scholarly voices from diverse contexts and social locations to bring new or unfamiliar facets of biblical texts to light. Matthew sheds new light from new perspectives on themes in the Gospel including community; land, labor, and Empire; children, parents, and families; health and disabilities; and border-crossings. The authors challenge us to consider how we deal with cultural distances between ourselves and these ancient writings—and between one another in the contemporary world.

Gandhi Before India

Gandhi Before India

Here is the first volume of a magisterial biography of Mohandas Gandhi that gives us the most illuminating portrait we have had of the life, the work and the historical context of one of the most abidingly influential—and controversial—men in modern history. Ramachandra Guha—hailed by Time as “Indian democracy’s preeminent chronicler”—takes us from Gandhi’s birth in 1869 through his upbringing in Gujarat, his two years as a student in London and his two decades as a lawyer and community organizer in South Africa. Guha has uncovered myriad previously untapped documents, including private papers of Gandhi’s contemporaries and co-workers; contemporary newspapers and court documents; the writings of Gandhi’s children; and secret files kept by British Empire functionaries. Using this wealth of material in an exuberant, brilliantly nuanced and detailed narrative, Guha describes the social, political and personal worlds inside of which Gandhi began the journey that would earn him the honorific Mahatma: “Great Soul.” And, more clearly than ever before, he elucidates how Gandhi’s work in South Africa—far from being a mere prelude to his accomplishments in India—was profoundly influential in his evolution as a family man, political thinker, social reformer and, ultimately, beloved leader. In 1893, when Gandhi set sail for South Africa, he was a twenty-three-year-old lawyer who had failed to establish himself in India. In this remarkable biography, the author makes clear the fundamental ways in which Gandhi’s ideas were shaped before his return to India in 1915. It was during his years in England and South Africa, Guha shows us, that Gandhi came to understand the nature of imperialism and racism; and in South Africa that he forged the philosophy and techniques that would undermine and eventually overthrow the British Raj. Gandhi Before India gives us equally vivid portraits of the man and the world he lived in: a world of sharp contrasts among the coastal culture of his birthplace, High Victorian London, and colonial South Africa. It explores in abundant detail Gandhi’s experiments with dissident cults such as the Tolstoyans; his friendships with radical Jews, heterodox Christians and devout Muslims; his enmities and rivalries; and his often overlooked failures as a husband and father. It tells the dramatic, profoundly moving story of how Gandhi inspired the devotion of thousands of followers in South Africa as he mobilized a cross-class and inter-religious coalition, pledged to non-violence in their battle against a brutally racist regime. Researched with unequaled depth and breadth, and written with extraordinary grace and clarity, Gandhi Before India is, on every level, fully commensurate with its subject. It will radically alter our understanding and appreciation of twentieth-century India’s greatest man.