The Shankill Butchers

Not for the squeamish, The Shankill Butchers is a horrifying detailed account of one of the most brutal series of murders in British legal history - a phenomenon whose real nature has been obscured by the troubled and violent context from ...

The Shankill Butchers

'This was the ultimate way to kill a man' During the 1970s a group of Protestant paramilitaries embarked on a spree of indiscriminate murder which left thirty Northern Irish Catholics dead. Their leader was Lenny Murphy, a fanatical Unionist whose Catholic-sounding surname led to his persecution as a child for which he took revenge on all Catholics. Not for the squeamish, The Shankill Butchers is a horrifying detailed account of one of the most brutal series of murders in British legal history - a phenomenon whose real nature has been obscured by the troubled and violent context from which it sprang.

The Shankill Butchers

Not for the squeamish, "The Shankill Butchers" is a horrifyingly detailed account of Lenny Murphy and his reign of terror in Northern Ireland. 21 halftones.

The Shankill Butchers

Not for the squeamish, "The Shankill Butchers" is a horrifyingly detailed account of Lenny Murphy and his reign of terror in Northern Ireland. 21 halftones.

The Cambridge Companion to the Irish Novel

1961 ) is based on Matthew Dillon's The Shankill Butchers , a documentary account of the loyalist killer gang which terrorised Belfast in the 1970s . McNamee takes the historical personages and actual events , and tries to explain the ...

The Cambridge Companion to the Irish Novel

This is the perfect overview of the Irish novel from the seventeenth century to the present day.

God and the Gun

In the 19705, Protestant paramilitary organisations believed that butchering innocent Catholics was an effective way of dealing with the IRA, and McClinton made his proposal when the Shankill Butchers were selecting their victims in the ...

God and the Gun

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Formations of Violence

The Butchers The convergence of telling, space, and violence is self-evident in the atrocity stories about Lenny ... Shankill Butcher stories push all conventional notions of instrumental violence in Northern Ireland to the background.

Formations of Violence

"A sophisticated and persuasive late-modernist political analysis that consistently draws the reader into the narratives of the author and those of the people of violence in Northern Ireland to whom he talked. . . . Simply put, this book is a feast for the intellect"—Thomas M. Wilson, American Anthropologist "One of the best books to have been written on Northern Ireland. . . . A highly imagination and significant book. Formations of Violence is an important addition to the literature on political violence."—David E. Schmitt, American Political Science Review

Loyalists

Remarkably, Murphy, the 'MasterButcher', continued to direct hisgang from insideLong Kesh, which had nowbecome known as ... I asked GustySpence why the 'Shankill Butchers' had not been stopped, given thatit was a fair assumption that, ...

Loyalists

Based on a series of frank interviews with both the paramilitary leaders who lead loyalist strategy and the gunmen who carried out the bombings. There are also interviews with loyalist and unionist politicians who operated centre-stage, with an account of the violence of the paramilitaries. There are no images in this edition.

A Force Like No Other

In this follow-up to his bestselling A Force Like No Other, Colin Breen brings together more compelling insider stories from RUC officers who served during the Troubles.

A Force Like No Other

In this follow-up to his bestselling A Force Like No Other, Colin Breen brings together more compelling insider stories from RUC officers who served during the Troubles. Includes stories about the IRA border campaign (1958-62), the Shankill Butchers murders and the 1987 Remembrance Day bombing in Enniskillen.

Tongue of Water Teeth of Stones

Then Longley retells Odysseus's revenge on the suitors and the maids as an act which purges Ireland from the baneful deeds of the " Butchers " ( an allusion to the Shankill Butchers , the perpetrators of a particularly bestial set of ...

Tongue of Water  Teeth of Stones

Arguably one of the most important American writers working today, Wendell Berry is the author of more than fifty books, including novels and collections of poems, short stories, and essays. A prominent spokesman for agrarian values, Berry frequently defends such practices and ideas as sustainable agriculture, healthy rural communities, connection to place, the pleasures of work, and the interconnectedness of life. In The Achievement of Wendell Berry: The Hard History of Love, Fritz Oehlschlaeger provides a sweeping engagement with Berry's entire corpus. The book introduces the reader to Berry's general philosophy and aesthetic through careful consideration of his essays. Oehlschlaeger pays particular attention to Berry as an agrarian, citizen, and patriot, and also examines the influence of Christianity on Berry's writings. Much of the book is devoted to lively close readings of Berry's short stories, novels, and poetry. The Achievement of Wendell Berry is a comprehensive introduction to the philosophical and creative world of Wendell Berry, one that offers new critical insights into the writing of this celebrated Kentucky author.

Crossing the Line

As widespread sectarian violence engulfed the society in the early 1970s, Loyalist paramilitaries, including the Shankill Butchers, used some of the illegal drinking clubs in the Shankill and in East Belfast as killing sites.

Crossing the Line

In Crossing the Line, former BBC journalist and best-selling author Martin Dillon recalls his courageous journalistic career spent ‘on the edge’ during the worst years of the modern Troubles. Following his childhood on Belfast’s Falls Road and his wandering teenage years, Dillon’s move into the world of journalism was soon to lead him down paths of extreme danger, putting himself in harm’s way to reveal the shocking truths of the emerging conflict in his native city. His extraordinary story reveals encounters with a roll-call of major political figures, paramilitaries, and Irish literary greats. Dillon’s memoir is as compelling as it is incisive; a riot of revelations on the political and sectarian conflict that rocked Belfast during the 1970s and ’80s. Dillon’s aptitude and ambition gave him unparalleled access to the worlds of politics, sectarian violence, literature and media – Crossing the Line exposes the complex and oftentimes devastating thread that joins them.

Wasted Years Wasted Lives Volume 2

The trial of the 'Shankill Butchers' came to an end on 20 February 1979. Eleven men were convicted of a total of 19 murders and the 42 life sentences handed out were the most ever in a single trial in British criminal history.

Wasted Years  Wasted Lives Volume 2

Over the past several years, Ken Wharton, himself a former soldier, has been prolific in his coverage of the Troubles, which spread their tentacles far from the streets, and fields of Northern Ireland. Over 4,000 people died in or as a consequence of them and it cost the lives of over 1,300 British soldiers - a fact which is unacknowledged by the MOD - and the lives of over 300 policemen and women. This is Ken's sixth book about the period and he draws on meticulous and detailed research, first-hand testimony of the soldiers who trod the same streets as himself, and an almost encyclopedic knowledge of the near 30-year period of murder, violence and civil war. The first-hand accounts help us to understand and examine the fears of the young soldiers who patrolled the dangerous streets of the Ardoyne and New Lodge, of Andersonstown, Turf Lodge and Ballymurphy and of the Creggan in Londonderry and the Derrybeg in Newry. He looks at the Loyalist paramilitaries and treats their sectarianism and mindless murder with the same contempt with which he treats the Republicans. He does not mince words about the Irish-Americans and their political stooges in the US Government, judicial system and the ordinary '7th generation Irishmen of the American East Coast.' This is a book not just for soldiers, but for anyone who wishes to look back and try to understand the madness inflicted upon several generations of innocent Irish and British people. In years to come, historians - both social and military - will reflect on this period of insanity with a greater knowledge than hitherto. If you wish to know how it felt to be an innocent sectarian victim, or an off-duty soldier or policeman or a young lad from Leeds, Liverpool or London hard targeting through the Lower Falls, then this book is a must read.

Wasted Years Wasted Lives Volume 1

On Monday 23, the Shankill Butchers struck again. Francis Rice (24), a Catholic, was abducted, beaten and had his throat cut by Murphy and his murderous cronies. His body was found near Mayo Street, just offthe Shankill Road.

Wasted Years  Wasted Lives Volume 1

Over the past several years, Ken Wharton, himself a former soldier, has been prolific in his coverage of the Troubles, which spread their tentacles far from the streets, and fields of Northern Ireland. Over 4,000 people died in or as a consequence of them and it cost the lives of over 1,300 British soldiers - a fact which is unacknowledged by the MOD - and the lives of over 300 policemen and women. This is Ken's sixth book about the period and he draws on meticulous and detailed research, first-hand testimony of the soldiers who trod the same streets as himself, and an almost encyclopedic knowledge of the near 30-year period of murder, violence and civil war. The first-hand accounts help us to understand and examine the fears of the young soldiers who patrolled the dangerous streets of the Ardoyne and New Lodge, of Andersonstown, Turf Lodge and Ballymurphy and of the Creggan in Londonderry and the Derrybeg in Newry. He looks at the Loyalist paramilitaries and treats their sectarianism and mindless murder with the same contempt with which he treats the Republicans. He does not mince words about the Irish-Americans and their political stooges in the US Government, judicial system and the ordinary '7th generation Irishmen of the American East Coast.' This is a book not just for soldiers, but for anyone who wishes to look back and try to understand the madness inflicted upon several generations of innocent Irish and British people. In years to come, historians - both social and military - will reflect on this period of insanity with a greater knowledge than hitherto. If you wish to know how it felt to be an innocent sectarian victim, or an off-duty soldier or policeman or a young lad from Leeds, Liverpool or London hard targeting through the Lower Falls, then this book is a must read.

Contemporary Irish Republican Prison Writing

The years during which Adams's writings appeared in Republican News coincided exactly with the reign of terror of the Shankill Butchers, whose sectarian murders Coogan ranks as “the worst single set of atrocities of the entire troubled ...

Contemporary Irish Republican Prison Writing

As it traces the textual history of the works of authors like Bobby Sands and Gerry Adams, this book analyses Republican resistance to disciplinary structures, demonstrating the ways in which prisoners appropriate space through discursive strategies.

Seamus Heaney s Regions

... to the Shankill Butchers, a Protestant murder gang of the mid- to late 1970s that abducted many Catholics in Belfast at random and killed them with butcher knives and other weapons, and to the Greek myth of Dedalus and Icarus, ...

Seamus Heaney   s Regions

Regional voices from England, Ireland, and Scotland inspired Seamus Heaney, the 1995 Nobel prize-winner, to become a poet, and his home region of Northern Ireland provided the subject matter for much of his poetry. In his work, Heaney explored, recorded, and preserved both the disappearing agrarian life of his origins and the dramatic rise of sectarianism and the subsequent outbreak of the Northern Irish “Troubles” beginning in the late 1960s. At the same time, Heaney consistently imagined a new region of Northern Ireland where the conflicts that have long beset it and, by extension, the relationship between Ireland and the United Kingdom might be synthesized and resolved. Finally, there is a third region Heaney committed himself to explore and map—the spirit region, that world beyond our ken. In Seamus Heaney’s Regions, Richard Rankin Russell argues that Heaney’s regions—the first, geographic, historical, political, cultural, linguistic; the second, a future where peace, even reconciliation, might one day flourish; the third, the life beyond this one—offer the best entrance into and a unified understanding of Heaney’s body of work in poetry, prose, translations, and drama. As Russell shows, Heaney believed in the power of ideas—and the texts representing them—to begin resolving historical divisions. For Russell, Heaney’s regionalist poetry contains a “Hegelian synthesis” view of history that imagines potential resolutions to the conflicts that have plagued Ireland and Northern Ireland for centuries. Drawing on extensive archival and primary material by the poet, Seamus Heaney’s Regions examines Heaney’s work from before his first published poetry volume, Death of a Naturalist in 1966, to his most recent volume, the elegiac Human Chain in 2010, to provide the most comprehensive treatment of the poet’s work to date.

The Making of Modern Irish History

... Martin Dillon's The Shankill Butchers ( 1989 ) and his Stone Cold ( 1992 ) , and Steve Bruce's The Red Hand ( 1992 ) - while there has been no published study of Official ( Ulster ) Unionism , which since its evolution in 1973-4 has ...

The Making of Modern Irish History

This volume brings together some of the most distinguished historians from Ireland to offer their own interpretations of key issues and events in Irish history.This volume brings together distinguished historians of Ireland, each of whom tackles a key question, issue or event in Irish history since the eighteenth century and:* examines its historiography* assesses the context of new interpretations* considers the strengths and weaknesses of revisionist ideas* offers their own interpretation.Topics covered are not only of historical interest but, in the context of recent revisionist debates, of contemporary political significance.These original contributions take account of new evidence and perspectives, as well as up-to-date historical methodology. Their combination of synthesis and analysis represent a valuable guide to the present state of the writing of modern Irish history.

The Dirty War

Craig was willing to offer them the intelligence they required to target particular people. ln May 1982 the leader of the infamous Shankill Butchers gang, Lenny Murphy, was released from prison and began an orgy of killing.

The Dirty War

1969 was a year of rising tension, violence and change for the people of Northern Ireland. Rioting in Derry's Bogside led to the deployment of British troops and a shortlived, uneasy truce. The British army soon found itself engaged in an undercover war against the Provisional IRA, which was to last for more than twenty years. In this enthralling and controversial book, Martin Dillon, author of the bestselling The Shankill Butchers, examines the roles played by the Provisional IRA, the State forces, the Irish Government and the British Army during this troubled period. He unravels the mystery of war in which informers, agents and double agents operate, revealing disturbing facts about the way in which the terrorists and the Intelligence Agencies target, undermine and penetrate each other's ranks. The Dirty War is investigative reporting at its very best, containing startling disclosures and throwing new light on previously inexplicable events.

The Trust

“In your studies and your briefings, did you ever come across a unionist bunch known as the Shankill Butchers?” I shook my head. “I don't think so. They killed my father?” She hung her head and then nodded. “They were a crazed, ...

The Trust

“A thrilling, action-filled suspense novel.... Those who loved Balson’s other books like Once We Were Brothers and Karolina’s Twins will love this latest entry.” —The Huffington Post The Trust, from Ronald H. Balson, the international bestselling author of Once We Were Brothers, finds private investigator Liam Taggart returning to his childhood home for an uncle's funeral, only to discover his death might not have been natural. When his uncle dies, Liam Taggart reluctantly returns to his childhood home in Northern Ireland for the funeral—a home he left years ago after a bitter confrontation with his family, never to look back. But when he arrives, Liam learns that not only was his uncle shot to death, but that he’d anticipated his own murder: In an astonishing last will and testament, Uncle Fergus has left his entire estate to a secret trust, directing that no distributions be made to any person until the killer is found. Did Fergus know, but refuse to name, his killer? Was this a crime of revenge, a vendetta leftover from Northern Ireland’s bloody sectarian war? After all, the Taggarts were deeply involved in the IRA. Or is it possible that the killer is a family member seeking Fergus’s estate? Otherwise, why postpone distributions to the heirs? Most menacingly, does the killer now have his sights on other family members? As his investigation draws Liam farther and farther into the past he has abandoned, he realizes he is forced to reopen doors long ago shut and locked. Now, accepting the appointment as sole trustee of the Fergus Taggart Trust, Liam realizes he has stepped into the center of a firestorm.

The Goalie

On one visit to the province, I was in a pub called the Rex Bar on Shankill Road when I was told someone wanted to meet me. I had been reading a book about a gang called the Shankill Butchers, who were part of the UVF in the 1970s.

The Goalie

This is the story of a genius with flaws. Lots of them. On the field, Andy Goram was a defiant figure between the sticks who, in many ways, defined the history-making nine-in-a-row team that brought so much success to Ibrox; off it, he careered through three divorces and a welter of lurid tabloid headlines sensationalising his hellraising antics. In this no-holds-barred account, Goram lifts the lid on his tempestuous life in football, from the Gers' glory days to a fairy-tale chapter with his boyhood heroes: Manchester United. His life in the Old Firm is examined in depth, from the saves that broke former Celtic manager Tommy Burns's heart to a story that was buried until now: Celtic's astonishing bid to sign him. Goram's Scotland career ended in bitterness when he walked out on the squad before France 98, and here he smashes the myths that have always surrounded his relationships with Craig Brown and Jim Leighton. This is the inside story of the man the fans voted Rangers' greatest-ever goalkeeper. He remains a genius with flaws: a legend simply known as The Goalie.

Historical Dictionary of the Northern Ireland Conflict

SHANKILL BUTCHERS. A loyalist gang linked to the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) that operated in the Shankill area of Belfast in the 1970s. The most notorious of the murders committed by the gang included the abduction of seven Catholics ...

Historical Dictionary of the Northern Ireland Conflict

The second edition of the Historical Dictionary of the Northern Ireland Conflict provides an accessible and comprehensive study of the conflict and peace process in Northern Ireland from the 1960s to 2016. The second edition of the book expands on the references relating to individuals, organizations and events of the Northern Ireland Troubles and adds material on significant subsequent developments. This the work provides a unique view of developments since the signing of the Good Friday Agreement in 1998. While widely heralded as the end of the Northern Ireland conflict the agreement instead witnessed the beginning of a new series of political difficulties to be addressed. The Historical Dictionary of the Northern Ireland Conflict is the first significant reference work to examine many of the issues related to political and cultural conflicts and dealing with the past which have grown in intensity since 1998. Many of these themes will be relevant to students of post-conflict societies in other areas of the world. This second edition of Historical Dictionary of the Historical Dictionary of the Northern Ireland Conflict contains a chronology, an introduction, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 300 cross-referenced entries on important personalities, politics, economy, foreign relations, religion, and culture.

Bear in Mind These Dead

We met for old-fashioned milky coffee a week or so later, in a cafe on the Shankill Road. ... What Robert's grandfather was before was Robert 'Basher' Bates, one of the Shankill Butchers. At his grandson's age, he was already a violent ...

Bear in Mind These Dead

'A moving and timely work, which captures the lasting pain and grief of those who lost loved ones during the Troubles.' Eoin McHugh, Sunday Independent Nearly 4,000 people were killed during the Troubles. Susan McKay's book explores the difficult aftermath of the violence for families, friends and communities. By interviewing those who loved the missing and the dead, as well as some who narrowly survived, McKay gives a voice to those who are too often overlooked in the political histories. She has found grief and rage, as well as forgiveness. This book is a powerful and important contribution to the Northern Ireland power-sharing process. Only by confronting the brutality of the past can there be any hope that the dead may finally be laid to rest. 'An exemplary undertaking . . . a necessary book, which restores humanity to those among the dead who tend to be remembered in terms of statistics alone. Susan McKay has gone about her difficult task with bravery and finesse.' Patricia Craig, Independent 'Peace can only endure if the dead can finally be laid to rest. Bear in Mind These Dead is a moving and important contribution to that process.' Derry Journal 'Tremendously moving . . . Anyone who wants to understand the sectarian conflict of Northern Ireland must examine the individual tragedies that go to make up the broader narrative. This is the grim task to which McKay so admirably applies herself.' Andrew Anthony, Observer

Forgetful Remembrance

The merciless perpetration of these heinous crimes resembles the blood-curdling murders of a sadistic loyalist gang known as the Shankill Butchers, which terrorized Catholic neighbourhoods in Belfast in the mid-1970s.

Forgetful Remembrance

Forgetful Remembrance examines the paradoxes of what actually happens when communities persistently endeavour to forget inconvenient events. The question of how a society attempts to obscure problematic historical episodes is addressed through a detailed case study grounded in the north-eastern counties of the Irish province of Ulster, where loyalist and unionist Protestants — and in particular Presbyterians — repeatedly tried to repress over two centuries discomfiting recollections of participation, alongside Catholics, in a republican rebellion in 1798. By exploring a rich variety of sources, Beiner makes it possible to closely follow the dynamics of social forgetting. His particular focus on vernacular historiography, rarely noted in official histories, reveals the tensions between professed oblivion in public and more subtle rituals of remembrance that facilitated muted traditions of forgetful remembrance, which were masked by a local culture of reticence and silencing. Throughout Forgetful Remembrance, comparative references demonstrate the wider relevance of the study of social forgetting in Northern Ireland to numerous other cases where troublesome memories have been concealed behind a veil of supposed oblivion.