The South in the New Nation 1789 1819

The first thirty years under the Federal Constitution encompass the most obscure period of Southern history. Thomas P. Abernethy brings this turbulent era into full focus for the first time in this book, Volume IV of A History of the South.

The South in the New Nation  1789   1819

The first thirty years under the Federal Constitution encompass the most obscure period of Southern history. Thomas P. Abernethy brings this turbulent era into full focus for the first time in this book, Volume IV of A History of the South. With Spain in possession of Florida and Louisiana, claiming and partially occupying everything west of the Alleghenies and south of the Tennessee River, and with England and France attempting to exploit Spain's weakness to strengthen their own positions in the New World, the Southern frontier was beset by active or potential enemies during most of the three decades under consideration. Thus the protection of our Southern and Western borders is one of the main themes of this volume.The South, of course, was not all frontier country, and the history of the well-established civilization of the South Atlantic states has not been neglected. Among the significant political and social developments which the author has reviewed at length are the transition form Washingtonian Federalism to Jeffersonian Republicanism; the unprecedented vast speculation in Western lands and their political repercussions; the separatist intrigues in the early West; such episodes of the Jefferson administration as the Louisiana Purchase, the Burr Conspiracy and the Embargo; and the events leading up to the War of 1812 and the Southern phase of the conflict.The product of many years of sustained effort on the part of a major Southern historian, The South in the New Nation adds significantly to our knowledge of American history.

Maryland the Federalist Years

... The New Nation During the Confederation , 1781-1789 by Merrill Jensen , copyright 1950 , by Alfred A. Knopf , Inc .; The South in the New Nation 1789-1819 , by Thomas P. Abernethy , copyright 1961 , by Louisiana State University ...

Maryland  the Federalist Years

The rise and fall of the Federalist Party in Maryland is detailed in this solid, traditional, narrative. Carefully documented, it examines the nature and voting patterns of the Federalist electorate in Maryland during the pre-Jacksonian era.

A Companion to the American South

New. Nation,. 1. 7. 90—1. 824. DANIEL S. DUPRE HE South's role in the early republic was, in one sense, ... Thomas Abernethy's The South in the New Nation, 1789-1819 (1961) minimizes conflict between the North and South and denies ...

A Companion to the American South

A Companion to the American South surveys and evaluates the most important and innovative writing on the entire sweep of the history of the southern United States. Contains 29 original essays by leading experts in American Southern history. Covers the entire sweep of Southern history, including slavery, politics, the Civil War, race relations, religion, and women's history. Surveys and evaluates the best scholarship on every important era and topic. Summarizes current debates and anticipates future concerns.

Thomas Jefferson and the New Nation

American Historical Association Annual Report, 1906 (Washington, 1908) Abernethy, Thomas P., The Burr Conspiracy (New York, 1954) The South in the New Nation, 17891819 (Baton Rouge, 1961) Western Lands and the American Revolution (New ...

Thomas Jefferson and the New Nation

The definitive life of Jefferson in one volume, this biography relates Jefferson's private life and thought to his prominent public position and reveals the rich complexity of his development. As Peterson explores the dominant themes guiding Jefferson's career--democracy, nationality, and enlightenment--and Jefferson's powerful role in shaping America, he simultaneously tells the story of nation coming into being.

Rancorous Enmities and Blind Partialities

Wilson Lumpkin, The Removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia (New York, 1907), I: 15. 8. Thomas Perkins Abernethy, The South in the New Nation, 1789-1819 (Baton Rouge, 1961), pp.162-163. 9. Donald A. MacPhee, “The Yazoo Controversy: ...

Rancorous Enmities and Blind Partialities

Political developments in Georgia have always been baffling to those who did not live there. This work picks up the story of the evolution of Georgia political parties where the author left it in his first book, Politics on the Periphery: Factions and Parties in Georgia, 1783-1806 (1986), carrying the story through 1845, by which date parties in Georgia actually mirrored those at the national level. It is a complicated story, involving, among other things, the legacy of the Yazoo Land Fraud; the development of political parties on the national level; and, especially, the presence of the Creek and Cherokee tribes in Georgia during a period when white Georgians were bent on expanding the culture of cotton. It is an unlovely story, but, by the mid-1840s, parties in Georgia finally resembled those in other parts of the nation, though, if one looked closely at their principles, questions remained.

Historical Dictionary of the Old South

Zahniser, Marvin R. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney: Founding Father. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1967. The Age of Thomas Jefferson and the Louisiana Purchase Abernethy, Thomas P. The South in the New Nation, 17891819.

Historical Dictionary of the Old South

Historical Dictionary of the Old South, Second Edition covers the history of the Old South through a chronology, an introductory essay, and an extensive bibliography. The cross-referenced dictionary section has over 600 cross referenced dictionary entries on politics, culture, and the economy of the Old South. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about the Old South.

Early Alabama

... 1798–1819,” Journal of Mississippi History 30 (August 1968): 173–92; Thomas P. Abernethy, The South in the New Nation: 17891819 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1961), 465; Edwin C. Bridges, Alabama: The Making of an ...

Early Alabama

An illustrated guidebook documenting the history and sites of the state's origins

The A to Z of the Old South

American Politics in the Early Republic: The New Nation in Crisis. New Haven, Conn. ... New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. Smelser, Martin. “The Federalist Period as ... Abernethy, Thomas P. The South in the New Nation, 17891819.

The A to Z of the Old South

Being considerably different from other regions of the country, most notably regarding its fervent practice of slavery, the land south of the Mason-Dixon line, because of slavery, enjoyed an exceptional prominence in politics, and after the invention of the cotton gin, a high degree of prosperity. However, also because of slavery, it was alienated from the rest of the nation, attempted to secede from the union, and was forced back in only after it lost the Civil War. Numerous cross-referenced entries on prominent individuals, including Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, Robert E. Lee, and Abraham Lincoln, as well as others on policies of the time that have since slipped into oblivion are all covered in this book. Economic, social and religious backgrounds trace the seemingly inevitable path to secession, war, and defeat. This reference also includes an introductory essay, a chronology, and a bibliography of the epoch.

The American South

Thomas P. Abernethy, The South in the New Nation, 17891819 (Baton Rouge, La., 1961), goes over the chronological ground of thirty crucial years, albeit in uneven fashion; strong on geographical expansion and Indian relations, ...

The American South

In The American South: A History, Fifth Edition, William J. Cooper, Jr., Thomas E. Terrill, and Christopher Childers demonstrate their belief that it is impossible to divorce the history of the South from the history of the United States. The authors' analysis underscores the complex interaction between the South as a distinct region and the South as an inescapable part of America. Cooper and Terrill show how the resulting tension has often propelled section and nation toward collision. In supporting their thesis, the authors draw on the tremendous amount of profoundly new scholarship in Southern history. Each volume includes a substantial bibliographical essay—completely updated for this edition—which provides the reader with a guide to literature on the history of the South. This first volume also includes updated chapters, tables, preface, and prologue.

The Southern Federalists 1800 1816

New York : Oxford University Press , 1954 . - The South in the New Nation , 1789-1819 . Vol . IV of 10 vols . , in Wendell Holmes Stephenson and E. Merton Coulter , eds . , A History of the South . Baton Rouge : Louisiana State ...

The Southern Federalists  1800   1816

With this definitive study of Federalism in the Jeffersonian South, James H. Broussard makes a significant contribution to the body of knowledge of the early political development of the United States and closes the gap in our knowledge of the Federalist party south of the Potomac.In a work grounded in fresh research from original sources, Broussard examines all aspects of Federalism in the states of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. In his broad coverage he shows how the particular political system of each states affected party development, how the Federalists used party organization and newspapers to increase their appeal, and how individual Federalists faced such issues as slavery, judicial reform, and government aid to education and economic development.Using previously unavailable data, The Southern Federalists presents a thorough analysis of the historical, demographic, and economic voter patterns of our first party system. Although national origin, religion, wealth, and support for the Constitution were the bases of Federalism in other areas, the only factor common to southern Federalists was their deep fear of France. When this fear was put tor est by Napoleon's final defeat in 1815, there was no further need for the Federalists to remain a cohesive party.

Politics on the Periphery

Thomas P. Abernethy , The South in the New Nation , 1789-1819 ( Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press , 1961 ) , 76-77 ; House Journal , 25 November 1789 , GDAH . 12. James Habersham to John Habersham , 25 November 1789 ...

Politics on the Periphery

By considering in detail ideology, sectionalism, social tensions, personalities, and land hunger as factors in Georgia politics, this study sheds new light on party formation in the early American republic. Illustrated.

John McKinley and the Antebellum Supreme Court

Thomas P. Abernethy, The South in the New Nation, 17891819 (Baton Rouge: louisiana State University Press, 1976), 471. 8. ibid. 9. Michael Paul Rogin, Fathers and Children:AndrewJackson and the Subjugation oftheAmerican Indian (new ...

John McKinley and the Antebellum Supreme Court

"Appendix: Justice John McKinley's Supreme Court Opinions and Dissents."

Alabama s Frontiers and the Rise of the Old South

This letter references a letter sent to Miró in June 1789. 59. Thomas P. Abernethy, A History of the South, vol. 4, The South in the New Nation, 17891819 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1961), 45–50. 60.

Alabama s Frontiers and the Rise of the Old South

Alabama endured warfare, slave trading, squatting, and speculating on its path to becoming Americas 22nd state, and Daniel S. Dupre brings its captivating frontier history to life in Alabama's Frontiers and the Rise of the Old South. Dupres vivid narrative begins when Hernando de Soto first led hundreds of armed Europeans into the region during the fall of 1540. Although this early invasion was defeated, Spain, France, and England would each vie for control over the areas natural resources, struggling to conquer it with the same intensity and ferocity that the Native Americans showed in defending their homeland. Although early frontiersmen and Native Americans eventually established an uneasy truce, the region spiraled back into war in the nineteenth century, as the newly formed American nation demanded more and more land for settlers. Dupre captures the riveting saga of the forgotten struggles and savagery in Alabamasand Americasfrontier days.

In Pursuit of Dead Georgians

54 On the Yazoo sale of 1789, see Thomas Perkins Abernethy, The South in the New Nation, 17891819 (Baton Rouge, La., 1961), 74–101; Lamplugh, Politics on the Periphery, 66–72. 55 Wereat to William Bingham, July 9, 1782, ...

In Pursuit of Dead Georgians

George R. Lamplugh, a historian of Georgia and the South, explores some of his home state’s most fascinating historical events, beginning with the American Revolution and continuing through the 1850s, in this well-researched collection of essays. He covers political factionalism during the American Revolution; the development of political parties in Georgia (which was different from the process in other states); and the impact of the Yazoo Land Fraud on Georgia’s political development. Some of the most fascinating essays focus on the maneuverings of individual politicians, such as William Few, who was determined to exert local influence after the American Revolution by having the Richmond County courthouse and jail, and hence the county polling place, constructed in the settlement of Brownsborough rather than in Augusta. More complex issues get equal treatment, such as how after the War of 1812, political parties in Georgia began to slowly adopt policies that were popular in other states—even though that meant hurting Creeks, Cherokees, and slaves. While Georgia didn’t always live up to democratic ideals, its political history teaches us a lot about our past and possible future.

Writing North Carolina History

The other book in the History of the South series covering this period, Thomas P. Abernethy, The South in the New Nation, 17891819 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1961), devotes most of its attention to the new southern ...

Writing North Carolina History

Writing North Carolina History is the first book to assess fully the historical literature of North Carolina. It combines the talents and insights of eight noted scholars of state and southern history: William S. Powell, Alan D. Watson, Robert M. Calhoon, Harry L. Watson, Sarah M. Lemmon, and H. G. Jones. Their essays are arranged in chronological order from the founding of the first English colony in North America in 1585 to the present. Traditionally North Carolina has not received the same scholarly attention as Virginia and South Carolina, despite the excellent resources available on Tar Heel history. This study, derived from a symposium sponsored by the North Carolina Division of Archives and History in 1977, asks questions and describes methodologies needed to redress past neglect. Besides providing a comprehensive evaluation of what has been written about North Carolina, the essayists offer perspectives on how historians have interpreted the state's history and what directions future historians need to take. Particularly important, the book provides a bibliography and suggests opportunities for future historical investigation by discussing topics, themes, and source materials that remain untapped or underused. North Carolina's unique and colorful culture, folklore, geography, politics, and growth demand new and creative historical analysis. Collectively the authors and editors of Writing North Carolina History offer a welcome, necessary guide to the study of Tar Heel history. Originally published in 1979. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

Cotton City

19. Stuart Seely Sprague, “Alabama Town Promotion during the Era of Good Feelings,” Alabama Historical Quarterly 37 ... 200–201; and Thomas P. Abernethy, The South in the New Nation, 17891819 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University ...

Cotton City

Amos's study delineates the basis for Mobile's growth and the ways in which residents and their government promoted growth and adapted to it.

The Self Inflicted Wound

Eaton's A History of the Old South (New York: Macmillan, 1949) is not as helpful as his The Growth of Southern Civilization, ... in Thomas P. Abernethy, The South in the New Nation, 1789-1819 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State Univ.

The Self Inflicted Wound

The essentially tragic political fate of the American South in the nineteenth century resulted from what Robert F. Durden calls a "self-inflicted wound"—the gradual surrender of the white majority to the pride, fears, and hates of racism. In this gracefully written and closely reasoned study, Durden traces the course of southern political life from the predominantly optimistic, nationalistic Jeffersonian era to the sullenly sectional, chronically defensive decades following the Civil War. Politics, as the clearest reflection of the southern electorate's collective hopes and fears, illustrates the South's transition from buoyant nationalism to aggrieved sectionalism. Like the rest of the new nation, the South entered the nineteenth century as proud heirs of the American Revolution and its ideology of liberty, property, and equal rights. But for southerners, from the 1820s on, that liberty came increasingly to mean the freedom to own slave property and to take that property into the nation's new western territories. As the possibility of a ban on slavery in the territories rose to the center of national attention during and after the Mexican War, the South's views on the "peculiar institution" became increasingly defensive and intransigent. The presidential victory in 1860 of an all-northern party pledged to the exclusion of slavery from the territories made the Civil War inevitable. In its aftermath, white southerners sought and ultimately found, in the hegemony of the Democratic party, other ways to maintain their national position and their dominance over the black minority. But the South would long suffer the aftereffects of its "self-inflicted wound."