The Spaces and Places of Horror

This volume explores the complex horizon of landscapes in horror film culture to better understand the use that the genre makes of settings, locations, spaces, and places, be they physical, imagined, or altogether imaginary.

The Spaces and Places of Horror

This volume explores the complex horizon of landscapes in horror film culture to better understand the use that the genre makes of settings, locations, spaces, and places, be they physical, imagined, or altogether imaginary. In The Philosophy of Horror, Noël Carroll discusses the “geography” of horror as often situating the filmic genre in liminal spaces as a means to displace the narrative away from commonly accepted social structures: this use of space is meant to trigger the audience’s innate fear of the unknown. This notion recalls Freud’s theorization of the uncanny, as it is centered on recognizable locations outside of the Lacanian symbolic order. In some instances, a location may act as one of the describing characteristics of evil itself: In A Nightmare on Elm Street teenagers fall asleep only to be dragged from their bedrooms into Freddy Krueger’s labyrinthine lair, an inescapable boiler room that enhances Freddie’s powers and makes him invincible. In other scenarios, the action may take place in a distant, little-known country to isolate characters (Roth’s Hostel films), or as a way to mythicize the very origin of evil (Bava’s Black Sunday). Finally, anxieties related to the encroaching presence of technology in our lives may give rise to postmodern narratives of loneliness and disconnect at the crossing between virtual and real places: in Kurosawa’s Pulse, the internet acts as a gateway between the living and spirit worlds, creating an oneiric realm where the living vanish and ghosts move to replace them. This suggestive topic begs to be further investigated; this volume represents a crucial addition to the scholarship on horror film culture by adopting a transnational, comparative approach to the analysis of formal and narrative concerns specific to the genre by considering some of the most popular titles in horror film culture alongside lesser-known works for which this anthology represents the first piece of relevant scholarship.

The Spaces and Places of Canadian Popular Culture

... product to every consumer, but have been adjusted to meet and reflect the tastes of specific spaces and places. ... In taking a close look at horror films, Follert asks why the popular American horror trope of the “Indian burial ...

The Spaces and Places of Canadian Popular Culture

An exclusively Canadian textbook, this collection investigates the relationships between identity, geography, and popular culture that are produced and consumed in this sprawling country. Expanding beyond the clichés of friendliness and snow, this text provides a fresh perspective on what it means to be Canadian, both nationally and transnationally. Scholars look at historical subjects like Québécois identity and Indigenous self-representation and explore issues in contemporary media, including music, film, television, comic books, video games, and social media. From Drake to the Tragically Hip, Trailer Park Boys to The Amazing Race Canada, and poutine to maple syrup, mainstream icons and trends are studied in the interdisciplinary context of race, gender, sexuality, politics, and patriotism. Contributing to the location of Canadian popular culture, this unique resource will engage students and scholars of communication studies, cultural studies, and Canadian studies. FEATURES - Includes key concepts and theories and a glossary - Engages students with relatable historical and contemporary examples of Canadiana through a breadth of media, including television shows, websites, journals, celebrities, newspapers, literature, comic books, video games, music, and films - Ensures equal representation of a national and transnational Canada, which includes examples of race, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity, with particular attention to geographical intricacies that contain all provinces and territories

Afrofuturism in Black Panther

... or The Wages of Double Consciousness” featured in Jordan Peele's Get Out Political Horror ( 2020), “They Are Still Here: Possession and Dispossession in the 21st Century Haunted House Film” in The Spaces and Places of Horror ...

Afrofuturism in Black Panther

This book examines Black Panther not only as a film grounded in Afro-futurism, but also as an invitation for viewers to think about relevant real-world social questions about identity, liberation, and racial justice, ultimately posing the question of how Black Panther invites a reimagining of Blackness.

Horror in Space

This collection of new essays examines the space horror subgenre, with a focus on such films as Paul W.S. Anderson's Event Horizon, Duncan Jones' Moon, Mario Bava's Planet of the Vampires and John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars.

Horror in Space

In sharp contrast to many 1960s science fiction films, with idealized views of space exploration, Ridley Scott's Alien (1979) terrified audiences, depicting a harrowing and doomed deep-space mission. The Alien films launched a new generation of horror set in the great unknown, inspiring filmmakers to take Earth-bound franchises like Leprechaun and Friday the 13th into space. This collection of new essays examines the space horror subgenre, with a focus on such films as Paul W.S. Anderson's Event Horizon, Duncan Jones' Moon, Mario Bava's Planet of the Vampires and John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars. Contributors discuss how filmmakers explored the concepts of the final girl/survivor, the uncanny valley, the isolationism of space travel, religion and supernatural phenomena.

Plants in Science Fiction

... Fantasy, and Horror: Bridging the Solitudes, More Critical Approaches to Comics: Theories and Methods, ... Horror Studies and has written book chapters for the forthcoming collections Ecohorror and The Spaces and Places of Horror.

Plants in Science Fiction

Plants have played key roles in science fiction novels, graphic novels and film. John Wyndham’s triffids, Algernon Blackwood’s willows and Han Kang’s sprouting woman are just a few examples. Plants surround us, sustain us, pique our imaginations and inhabit our metaphors – but in many ways they remain opaque. The scope of their alienation is as broad as their biodiversity. And yet, literary reflections of plant-life are driven, as are many threads of science fictional inquiry, by the concerns of today. Plants in Science Fiction is the first-ever collected volume on plants in science fiction, and its original essays argue that plant-life in SF is transforming our attitudes toward morality, politics, economics and cultural life at large – questioning and shifting our understandings of institutions, nations, borders and boundaries; erecting and dismantling new visions of utopian and dystopian futures.

Horror in the Age of Steam

(5) As Smith and Hughes note, ecoGothicism is an extension of gothic Romantic naturalism, and in studying the environmental spaces of gothic places, ecocritics who explore literary gothicism often examine the illustration of the ...

Horror in the Age of Steam

Change is terrifying, and rapid change, within a small amount of time, is destabilizing to any culture. England, under the tutelage of Queen Victoria, witnessed precipitous change the likes of which it had not encountered in generations. Wholesale swaths of the economy and the social structure underwent complete recalibration, through the hands of economic progress, industrial innovation, scientific discovery, and social cohesiveness. Faced with such change, Britons had to redefine the concept of work, belief, and even what it meant to be English. Victorians relied on many methods to attempt to release the steam from the anxieties incurred through change, and one of those methods was the horror story of everyday existence during an age of transition. This book is a study of how authors Elizabeth Gaskell, Emily Brontë, and Anne Brontë turned to horrifying representations of everyday reality to illustrate the psychological-traumatic terrors of an age of transition

Psycho in the Shower

In film after film, Hitchcock meticulously crafts his spaces and places to position his camera in the most imaginative way to advance the narrative, ... I have a horror of what I call the passport photograph: shooting straight in ...

Psycho in the Shower

"With this book, Philip Skerry makes an ambitious and largely successful effort to restore perspective to the debate that has swirled around Psycho since Hitchcock first ripped back the shower curtain of our expectations in 1960 and plunged his knife into the collective cinematic consciousness." - John Baxter, Film International Psycho in the Shower is a multi-dimensional study of Psycho's astonishing shower scene. Philip J. Skerry shows how it may be the most significant and influential film scene of all and substantiates this claim by providing chapters on the evolution of the scene in Hitchcock's career, with particular focus on his methods for creating suspense and terror in the audience. In tracing the evolution of the shower scene, the author discusses and analyzes many films (both Hitchcockian and otherwise) that lead up to Psycho. The book places the shower scene in the cultural and social contexts of American popular culture of the 1950s and 1960s, arguing that it helped to create a revolution in both sensibility and cinematic style. Several unique dimensions help to set this study apart from other books on Psycho and Hitchcock: extensive and detailed interviews with people who worked on the film, including star Janet Leigh and screenwriter Joseph Stefano (the last significant interviews before their deaths); a close study of Hitchcock's employment of mise en scene and montage in the scenes leading up to the famous shower murder; a shot by shot analysis of the scene itself and a discussion of the numerous controversies surrounding it; and a provocative and insightful account of the writing of the book itself, which provides a unique look at the author's creative process. The book culminates with examples of how the shower scene has become embedded in the matrix of contemporary culture and the remarkable ways in which the scene affected people on first viewing.

Sketching Youth Self and Youth Work

Memories are connected to these places and spaces as in the photos of my youth, leaning on an oar, sitting in my father's ... and places shaped them and these were not the spaces and places of a happy youth, but rather spaces of horror, ...

Sketching Youth  Self  and Youth Work

In part a semi-autobiographical memoir of the life of a youth worker and in part a supplemental text that can be used to learn a method of qualitative research and youth work practice, Sketching Youth, Self, and Youth Work is a book for practitioners, scholars and researchers trying to understand human interactions.

Theatrical Spaces and Dramatic Places

Horror vacui also describes vacant areas of negative space that are juxtaposed to areas of crowded figuration — a commonplace in early commedia images . An outcome of horror vacui is the division of the image into separate nonintegrated ...

Theatrical Spaces and Dramatic Places

This volume brings together experts in the field of Renaissance theatre architecture. It considers concepts and applications of theatrical space during the early modern period.

Sociology Youth and Youth Work Practice

Young people's lives should be understood in the context of the spaces and places in which they are located, ... James Watkins' 2008 horror movie Eden Lake evokes similar anxieties but partially sets these in a rural lakeside location.

Sociology  Youth and Youth Work Practice

How can sociology inform our understanding of young people's experiences? Introducing core theories by drawing on a range of cultural resources - from pioneering research to genre-defining films - this book demonstrates how a sociological imagination can enhance informal educational and social welfare approaches to work with young people.

World Building

... it will analyse the ways spaces and places are represented and designed, as well as the (player) characters' behaviors these spaces and places motivate. More precisely, in order to underscore the questions of survival and of horror, ...

World Building

This edited collection of original essays situates itself at the cutting edge of media theory, exploring imaginary worlds as forms of knowledge and forms of life. By exploring the concept of worlds from theoretical and practical perspectives, this book puts forward a unique and original starting point for rethinking media theory, going beyond the notion of communication and understanding the role of worlds in interaction rituals as well as the building of values and meaning in contemporary society. In recent years, due to digital distribution and the integration of social networking and entertainment content, viewing strategies and narrative forms are undergoing important changes. Notably, we are faced with the rise of multi- platform conglomerates, in which film, television, Internet, graphic novels, toys, and virtual environments create heterogeneous yet compact universes, recognizable as brands and having a well-defined semiotic identity. Scholars are looking for new theoretical tools to understand the role of contemporary new media in these phenomena and the increasingly central place that viewers hold in exploring, mapping, interpreting and expanding story worlds. On the one hand, Internet networks are increasingly studied as the environment for the emergence of forms of consumption through fragments. As Henry Jenkins recently underlined, media become spreadable (Jenkins, Ford, Green 2013). On the other, the observation of production practices in the contemporary media sphere shows that, instead of being only fluid and ephemeral elements, media fragments sometimes converge in persistent and heterogeneous spaces built from multiple contributions and comparable to worlds. Media creators don't merely forge stories or characters. Instead, they build worlds: fictional worlds, character worlds, alternative worlds...

The Speed Handbook

With Conrad's eerie tale, we can see how the new horror of slowness never exists outside political realities. ... and more a permeable space where action and movement are possible, then older notions of a hierarchy of spaces and places, ...

The Speed Handbook

Speed, the sensation one gets when driving fast, was described by Aldous Huxley as the single new pleasure invented by modernity. The Speed Handbook is a virtuoso exploration of Huxley’s claim. Enda Duffy shows how the experience of speed has always been political and how it has affected nearly all aspects of modern culture. Primarily a result of the mass-produced automobile, the experience of speed became the quintessential way for individuals to experience modernity, to feel modernity in their bones. Duffy plunges full-throttle into speed’s “adrenaline aesthetics,” offering deft readings of works ranging from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, through J. G. Ballard’s Crash, to the cautionary consumerism of Ralph Nader. He describes how speed changed understandings of space, distance, chance, and violence; how the experience of speed was commodified in the dawning era of mass consumption; and how society was incited to abhor slowness and desire speed. He examines how people were trained by new media such as the cinema to see, hear, and sense speed, and how speed, demanded of the efficient assembly-line worker, was given back to that worker as the chief thrill of leisure. Assessing speed’s political implications, Duffy considers how speed pleasure was offered to citizens based on criteria including their ability to pay and their gender, and how speed quickly became something to be patrolled by governments. Drawing on novels, news reports, photography, advertising, and much more, Duffy provides a breakneck tour through the cultural dynamics of speed.

Topophrenia

The relevance of space and place to the novel is not limited to the physical or political geography so frequently ... The haunted house, for instance, has provided a memorable site for mystery or horror from Horace Walpole's gothic The ...

Topophrenia

What is our place in the world, and how do we inhabit, understand, and represent this place to others? Topophrenia gathers essays by Robert Tally that explore the relationship between space, place, and mapping, on the one hand, and literary criticism, history, and theory on the other. The book provides an introduction to spatial literary studies, exploring in detail the theory and practice of geocriticism, literary cartography, and the spatial humanities more generally. The spatial anxiety of disorientation and the need to know one's location, even if only subconsciously, is a deeply felt and shared human experience. Building on Yi Fu Tuan's "topophilia" (or love of place), Tally instead considers the notion of "topophrenia" as a simultaneous sense of place-consciousness coupled with a feeling of disorder, anxiety, and "dis-ease." He argues that no effective geography could be complete without also incorporating an awareness of the lonely, loathsome, or frightening spaces that condition our understanding of that space. Tally considers the tension between the objective ordering of a space and the subjective ways in which narrative worlds are constructed. Narrative maps present a way of understanding that seems realistic but is completely figurative. So how can these maps be used to not only understand the real world but also to put up an alternative vision of what that world might otherwise be? From Tolkien to Cervantes, Borges to More, Topophrenia provides a clear and compelling explanation of how geocriticism, the spatial humanities, and literary cartography help us to narrate, represent, and understand our place in a constantly changing world.

Mastering the Novels of Jane Austen

social. spaces. of. Bath. Characters meet to gossip, divulge confidences and discuss books in the richly detailed and specifically located places of Bath: the Assembly room, the theatre, the Crescent, Brock-street, Edgar's Buildings, ...

Mastering the Novels of Jane Austen

Mastering the Novels of Jane Austen is the ideal companion for anyone studying the works of this endearing literary figure. An engaging account of the six most-read Austen novels, this book captures the imagination with its fresh and lively approach. - Provides a detailed critique of Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion - Links the significance of the works from the past to the present day in the light of contemporary attitudes to women, tradition, and innovation - Explores the influence of art, architecture, music, literature, theology, philosophy, history and politics in the novels - Discusses both traditional and contemporary literary theory, and examines Austen's use of wit and irony, and the nuances of her vocabulary If you are looking for a book that will entertain, challenge, and illuminate your understanding of Jane Austen, this is it! A must-have guide for anyone preparing for exams or looking to gain the maximum satisfaction from their reading of the novels of this much-loved author.

At Home in the Whedonverse

sensory deprivation, isolation (“a Love supreme”) and lobotomy (the attic). the Dollhouse follows a horror discourse ... Non-Places. Michel Foucault discusses heterotopias: spaces where incompatible spatial and temporal sites converge.

At Home in the Whedonverse

From Buffy the Vampire Slayer to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Joss Whedon’s work presents various representations of home spaces that give depth to his stories and storytelling. Through the spaceship in Firefly, a farmhouse in Avengers: Age of Ultron or Whedon’s own house in Much Ado About Nothing, his work collectively offers audiences the opportunity to question the ways we relate to and inhabit homes. Focusing on his television series, films and comics, this collection of new essays explores the diversity of home spaces in Whedon’s many ’verses, and the complexity these spaces afford the narratives, characters, objects and relationships within them.

Spectacle Pedagogy

cultural history, the undecidability of their in-between, empty, silent spaces conjures horror vacui, a fear of empty places, which the philosopher Aristotle characterized as nature's abhorrence of a void and its continual effort to ...

Spectacle Pedagogy

Examines the interrelationships between art, politics, and visual culture post-9/11.

Screening the Undead

What matters is that they have moved through the spaces and places of Sweden, have been animated by and interacted with these ... 4 Rebecca A. Umland and Samuel J. Umland, 'Burn Witch Burn: A First Look at the Scandinavian Horror Film', ...

Screening the Undead

The vampire and the zombie, the two most popular incarnations of the undead, are brought together for a forensic critical investigation in Screening the Undead. Both have a long history in popular fiction, film, television, comics and games; the vampire also remains central to popular culture today, from literary 'paranormal romance' to cult TV and movie franchises - by turns romantic, tortured, grotesque, countercultural, a goth icon or lonely outsider. The zombie can shamble or, nowadays, sprint with alarming velocity, and even dance. It frequently lends itself to metaphor and can stand in for fascism or ecological disaster, but is perhaps most frequently a harbinger and instrument of the apocalypse. Leading writers on Horror and cult media consider the sexy vampire and the grotesque zombie, as well as hybrid figures who do not fit neatly into either category. These are examined across a range of contexts, from the Swedish vampire to the Afro-American Blacula, from the lesbian vampire to the gay zombie, from the Spanish Knights Templar riding skeletal horses to dancing Japanese zombies. Screening the Undead sheds new light on these two icons of terror - and desire - whose popular longevity has taken them 'Beyond Life'.

The Streaming of Hill House

Several visual and spatial elements stand out for their contribution to the horror of Luke's ordeal. ... that we return to in our later conceptions of idealized spaces and places.10 The imaginative access of a child is just the sort of ...

The Streaming of Hill House

Netflix's The Haunting of Hill House has received both critical acclaim and heaps of contempt for its reimagining of Shirley Jackson's seminal horror novel. Some found Mike Flanagan's series inventive, respectful and terrifying. Others believed it denigrated and diminished its source material, with some even calling it a "betrayal" of Jackson. Though the novel has produced a great deal of scholarship, this is the first critical collection to look at the television series. Featuring all new essays from noted scholars and award-winning horror authors, this collection goes beyond comparing the novel and the Netflix adaptation to look at the series through the lenses of gender, architecture, education, hauntology, addiction, and trauma studies including analysis of the show in the context of 9/11 and #Me Too. Specific essays compare the series with other texts, from Flanagan's other films and other adaptations of Jackson's novel, to the television series Supernatural, Toni Morrison's Beloved and the 2018 film Hereditary. Together, this collection probes a terrifying television series about how scary reality can truly be, usually because of what it says about our lives in America today.

Sharing Common Ground

our experience developing our spatial sensibilities in such primordial places as dwellings, our experience elaborating a personal ... in the other.41 These are the spaces of horror brought to mind and recalled in places out of time.

Sharing Common Ground

Sharing Common Ground makes a compelling contribution to an important emerging field that affects a broad swath of humanities. It uses historical, photographic, and literary examples, including an entirely new translation of a little known work by Marguerite Duras, presented here in full, to showcase the ethical capacity of art. Robert Harvey deploys critical tools borrowed from literature, aesthetics, and philosophy to mobilize the thought of several seminal figures in literature and theory including Michel Foucault, Marguerite Duras, Georges Didi-Huberman, and Giorgio Agamben, among a host of others. Construction sites, concentration camps, cemeteries, slums-such are only a few of the spaces that impel our imagination naturally toward what we commonly call “cultural memory.” Sharing Common Ground reveals how the endeavor to think and imagine in common, and especially about the spaces we inhabit together, is critically important to human beings, artistically, culturally, and ethically.

Horror Fiction

Often , indeed , women horror writers can be seen to explore and then exorcise very different configurations of horror , investing different spaces , places , and relations with the powers of horror . Looking at such differences ...

Horror Fiction

This is a series of introductory books about different types of writing. One strand of the series focuses on genres such asScience Fiction, Horror, Romance, and Crime, and the other focuses on movements or styles often associated with historicaland cultural locations—Postcolonial, Native American, Scottish, Irish, American Gothic.Authors covered in this volume includeWilliam Peter Blatty, Ira Levine, BramStoker, Shirley Jackson, Angela Carter,Mary Shelley, Stephen King, Anne Rice,and Washington Irving.