The Story of English in 100 Words

In this unique new history of the world's most ubiquitous language, linguistics expert David Crystal draws on words that best illustrate the huge variety of sources, influences and events that have helped to shape our vernacular since the ...

The Story of English in 100 Words

Featuring Latinate and Celtic words, weasel words and nonce-words, ancient words ('loaf') to cutting edge ('twittersphere') and spanning the indispensable words that shape our tongue ('and', 'what') to the more fanciful ('fopdoodle'), Crystal takes us along the winding byways of language via the rude, the obscure and the downright surprising. In this unique new history of the world's most ubiquitous language, linguistics expert David Crystal draws on words that best illustrate the huge variety of sources, influences and events that have helped to shape our vernacular since the first definitively English word was written down in the fifth century ('roe', in case you are wondering).

Spell It Out

He unearths the stories behind the rogue words that confound us, and explains why these peculiarities entered the mainstream, in an epic journey taking in sixth century monks, French and Latin upstarts, the Industrial Revolution and the ...

Spell It Out

Why is there an 'h' in ghost? William Caxton, inventor of the printing press and his Flemish employees are to blame: without a dictionary or style guide to hand in fifteenth century Bruges, the typesetters simply spelled it the way it sounded to their foreign ears, and it stuck. Seventy-five per cent of English spelling is regular but twenty-five per cent is complicated, and in Spell It Out our foremost linguistics expert David Crystal extends a helping hand to the confused and curious alike. He unearths the stories behind the rogue words that confound us, and explains why these peculiarities entered the mainstream, in an epic journey taking in sixth century monks, French and Latin upstarts, the Industrial Revolution and the internet. By learning the history and the principles, Crystal shows how the spellings that break all the rules become easier to get right.

Slide and Seek 100 Words English Spanish

Colorful artwork brings the pages to life in entertaining and educational ways. Lift-the-flaps add an extra level of engagement to this book that helps pre-readers at the earliest stages of development.

Slide and Seek  100 Words English Spanish

Play slide and seek to reveal 100 new words in both English and Spanish with this larger format board book. With multiple tabs to pull and flaps to lift, new words await young learners in Slide and Seek: 100 Words English-Spanish. Each page of this larger format board book contains a single pull tab that reveals the English and Spanish versions of a word. Colorful artwork brings the pages to life in entertaining and educational ways. Lift-the-flaps add an extra level of engagement to this book that helps pre-readers at the earliest stages of development. Every spread includes a visual puzzle!

100 Words to Make You Sound Great

As it happens, the meaning of the adjective nice has undergone a great deal of
change in the past few centuries, while the noun nicety has kept pretty much the
same meaning it has had since Middle English times. The story of nice begins
with ...

100 Words to Make You Sound Great

100 Words to Make You Sound Great showcases 100 words illustrated by quotations that are historic, moving, insightful, humorous, and fun to read. The Editors of the American Heritage Dictionaries have carefully selected them as evidence that it pays to have a strong vocabulary. These 100 words have been put to great effect by some of our most important and beloved speakers and writers. Each sense of a word is shown in a separate quotation. Many quotes are from famous public speeches and award-winning books. A number were used in personal letters, showing that it is just as important to have a vibrant vocabulary in private communication as it is in public. The people quoted range across the spectrum of human endeavor. There are famous political leaders from the past (Mohandas K. Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, Ronald Reagan), contemporary politicians (Benazir Bhutto and Barack Obama), scientists (Rachel Carson, Carl Sagan, Edward O.Wilson), economists (Alan Greenspan, John Maynard Keynes, Adam Smith), academics (Henry Louis Gates Jr., Ruth Simmons, Helen Vendler), figures of conscience (James Baldwin, Bono, Eleanor Roosevelt), and even humorists (Garrison Keillor, Groucho Marx, Sarah Vowell). They are all captivating communicators, and they all sound great. 100 Words to Make You Sound Great offers a fascinating way to improve and reinforce a versatile vocabulary. Anyone who is interested in the effective use of words will find it hard to put down. 26

The 100 Words That Make The English

above the story of an Asian fish and chip shop owner who was, in their words, '
facing a battering' from the world-famous chain Harry Ramsden's after calling his
business Harry Ramadan's. Harresh Ramadan, 30, had converted his struggling
 ...

The 100 Words That Make The English

Englishness is an ancient and powerful concept, but no one seems sure exactly what it means in the twenty-first century. In exploring our national identity, Tony Thorne has compiled a fascinating compendium of the hundred words and phrases that have become the cornerstones of modern English, and have been used - sometimes deliberately, but often inadvertently - to stake out our common ground, to define what makes us essentially English, and thus different from those beastly foreigners who lurk just off our shores.

Making a Point

Professor Crystal leads us through this minefield with characteristic wit, clarity and commonsense.

Making a Point

This 'engaging history of punctuation' (Wall Street Journal) is not only the first history of its kind, but a complete guide on how to use English punctuation. Behind every punctuation mark lies a thousand stories. The punctuation of English, marked with occasional rationality, is founded on arbitrariness and littered with oddities. For a system of a few dozen marks it generates a disproportionate degree of uncertainty and passion, inspiring organisations like the Apostrophe Protection Society and sending enthusiasts, correction-pens in hand, in a crusade against error. Professor Crystal leads us through this minefield with characteristic wit, clarity and commonsense. He gives a fascinating account of the origin and progress of every kind of punctuation mark over one and a half millennia, and he offers sound advice on how punctuation may be used to meet the needs of every occasion and context.

Sounds Appealing

Sounds Appealing tells us exactly why, and how, we pronounce words as we do. Pronunciation is integral to communication, and is tailored to meet the demands of the two main forces behind language: intelligibility and identity.

Sounds Appealing

It's not what you say, it's the way that you say it ... There have long been debates about 'correct' pronunciation in the English language, and Britain's most distinguished linguistic expert, David Crystal, is here to set the record straight. Sounds Appealing tells us exactly why, and how, we pronounce words as we do. Pronunciation is integral to communication, and is tailored to meet the demands of the two main forces behind language: intelligibility and identity. Equipping his readers with knowledge of phonetics, linguistics and physiology - with examples ranging from Eliza Doolittle to Winston Churchill - David Crystal explores the origins of regional accents, how they are influenced by class and education, and how their peculiarities have changed over time.

That s Not English

Letter from America. London: Penguin, 2007. Crystal, David. The Story of English
in 100 Words. London: Profile Books, 2011. Deutscher, Guy. Through the
Language Glass: How Words Colour Your World. London: William Heinemann,
2010.

That s Not English

An expat’s witty and insightful exploration of English and American cultural differences through the lens of language that will leave readers gobsmacked In That’s Not English, the seemingly superficial differences between British and American English open the door to a deeper exploration of a historic and fascinating cultural divide. In each of the thirty chapters, Erin Moore explains a different word we use that says more about us than we think. For example, "Quite" exposes the tension between English reserve and American enthusiasm; in "Moreish," she addresses our snacking habits. In "Partner," she examines marriage equality; in "Pull," the theme is dating and sex; "Cheers" is about drinking; and "Knackered" covers how we raise our kids. The result is a cultural history in miniature and an expatriate’s survival guide. American by birth, Moore is a former book editor who specialized in spotting British books—including Eats, Shoots & Leaves—for the US market. She’s spent the last seven years living in England with her Anglo American husband and a small daughter with an English accent. That’s Not English is the perfect companion for modern Anglophiles and the ten million British and American travelers who visit one another’s countries each year.

For Who the Bell Tolls

With three colleagues, Quirk produced the monumental A Comprehensive
Grammar of the English Language in 1985. I prefer The Use of English, a warm
and ... book, but a wonderful read. 2 The Story of English in 100 Words, David
Crystal ...

For Who the Bell Tolls

For Who the Bell Tolls is a book that explains the grammar that people really need to know, such as the fact that an apostrophe is the difference between a company that knows its s*** and a company that knows it's s***, or the importance of capital letters to avoid ambiguity in such sentences as 'I helped my Uncle Jack off his horse.' David Marsh's lifelong mission has been to create order out of chaos. For four decades, he has worked for newspapers, from the Sun to the Financial Times, from local weeklies that sold a few thousand copies to the Guardian, with its global readership of nine million, turning the sow's ear of rough-and-ready reportage into a passable imitation of a silk purse. The chaos might be sloppy syntax, a disregard for grammar or a fundamental misunderstanding of what grammar is. It could be an adherence to 'rules' that have no real basis and get in the way of fluent, unambiguous communication at the expense of ones that are actually useful. Clear, honest use of English has many enemies: politicians, business and marketing people, local authority and civil service jargonauts, rail companies, estate agents, academics . . . and some journalists. This is the book to help defeat them. 'A splendid and, more importantly, sane book on English grammar.' Mark Forsyth, author of The Etymologicon

Making Sense

In this book, David Crystal confronts the foe of many : grammar.

Making Sense

In this book, David Crystal confronts the foe of many : grammar. Once taught relentlessly to all students in the English-speaking world, grammar disappeared from most school curricula, so terms such as "preposition" and "conjunction" now often confound children and adults alike. In this breezy, entertaining book, Crystal proves that grammar needn't make us uneasy--we can all make sense of how we make sense. -- Provided by publisher.

Vera Clark s Teach Me to Read English in 100 Easy Lessons

Sample comprehension questions for other books or stories: These often are
questions about Who, What, When, ... When your child can write letters properly,
then it is time to start having her write the three-letter words learned in Lesson 1.

Vera Clark s Teach Me to Read English in 100 Easy Lessons

[ Easy, fast, phonics-based reading program [ 2 page lessons [ 15 minutes a day [ Simple, step-by-step instructions [ Great for children and adults [ Made by teacher, designed for parents [ Starts at the very beginning - from non-reader to total fluency [ Everything you need in one volume - Flash cards included [ No education required - anyone can do this! [ Students learn at their own pace [ Perfect for remedial instruction and for developing a confident reader [ Perfect for home schooling! Parents often make the best teachers! VERA CLARK is a special education teacher whose specialty is teaching young and old alike to read. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology and a Master of Arts degree in Education, with an emphasis in Special Education. She is currently teaching Special Education students as a Resource Specialist. She lives in Southern California with her two youngest children. Vera has taught in private and public schools and has homeschooled her children. She is the mother of four children, three daughters and one son. Her passion is teaching children how to read. She taught each of her children to read when they were toddlers. She has also taught many struggling children and adults to read. What Vera finds especially rewarding is showing parents how to teach their own children. She is pleased to share this book with you so that you, too, may experience the great joy of teaching your children to read.

The Story of Be

As he reveals be's multiple incarnations, David Crystal takes us to the heart of our flexible and changing language. He tells the intriguing story in 26 chapters, each linked to a particular usage.

The Story of Be

It's the most simple, unassuming, innocent-looking verb: 'to be'. Yet it is jam-packed with more different meanings, forms, and uses than any other English word. As he reveals be's multiple incarnations, David Crystal takes us to the heart of our flexible and changing language. He tells the intriguing story in 26 chapters, each linked to a particular usage. We meet circumstantial be ('how are you?'), numerical be ('two and two is four'), quotative be ('so I was like, "wow"'), and ludic be ('oh no he isn't!'), and a whole swarm of other meanings. Bringing the ideas to life are a host of examples from sources as varied as Beowulf, Jane Austen, pantomime, Hamlet (of course), and Star Wars, with cartoons from Ed McLachlan and Punch peppered throughout. Full of fascinating nuggets of information, it is a book to delight any lover of words and language.

Words in Time and Place

This fascinating book will appeal to anyone with an interest in words and in the development of the English language.

Words in Time and Place

Did you know that the English language has over 150 words for the adjective 'drunk' developed over 1,000 years? Be prepared to learn words you have never heard before, find out fascinating facts behind everyday words, and be surprised at how lively and varied the English language can be. Published to critical acclaim in 2009, the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary is the first comprehensive thesaurus in the world to arrange words by meaning in order of first recorded use. Using its unique perspective on how the English language has developed, Words in Time and Place takes 15 themes and explores the language in these areas over time - explaining when new words appeared, where they came from, and what such changes say about times in which they emerged. The themes chosen are varied, universal topics and show the semantic range of the thesaurus and what it can tell us about the words used in areas of everyday life. Learn about the different words for dying and money, or types of pop music, as well as words for a privy, oaths, and words for being drunk. Written by the world's leading expert on the English language, David Crystal, the book carries his trademark style of engaging yet authoritative writing. Each chapter features an introduction to the language of that topic, followed by a timeline of vocabulary taken from the historical thesaurus showing all the synonyms arranged in chronological order. The timelines are annotated with additional quotations, facts, and social and historical context to give a clear sense of how words entered the English language, when, and in which context they were used. Words in Time and Place showcases the unique and excellent resource that is the Historical Thesaurus and reveals the linguistic treasures to be found within. This fascinating book will appeal to anyone with an interest in words and in the development of the English language.

Let s Talk

Banter, chit-chat, gossip, natter, tete-a-tete: these are just a few of the terms for the varied ways in which we interact with one another through conversation.

Let s Talk

Banter, chit-chat, gossip, natter, tete-a-tete: these are just a few of the terms for the varied ways in which we interact with one another through conversation. David Crystal explores the factors that motivate so many different kinds of talk and reveals the rules we use unconsciously, even in the most routine exchanges of everyday conversation. We tend to think of conversation as something spontaneous, instinctive, habitual. It has been described as an art, as a game, sometimes even as a battle. Whichever metaphor we use, most people are unaware of what the rules are, how they work, and how we can bend and break them when circumstances warrant it.

English Alive

Writing : making a summary Make a summary of the passage in 4 . 2 . Do not use
more than 100 words . Do not spend more than 30 minutes on this task . Use one
of these two methods : a ) Aim to write 10 - 15 words about each of the six main ...

English Alive

English Alive is a four-book series designed specifically to meet the needs of English students in Caribbean secondary schools. The series adopts a lively and exciting new approach to the study of English, helping students to become more confident in their use of English and ultimately succeed at their exam.

100 Words Almost Everyone Mispronounces

In English , the Biblical name Babel has traditionally been pronounced ( bā ' bəl )
, with the first syllable like the word bay . Older dictionaries and pronunciation
manuals are unanimous on this point . Nowadays , however , some people ...

100 Words Almost Everyone Mispronounces

An entertaining guide to English language pronunciation highlights one hundred words and their pronunciation complications, including such terms as cadre, forte, lingerie, harass, dour, desultory, and mischievous. Original.

English Around Us Reader 8

It seemed Writing Activity Write a brief report in about 100 words on the accident
reported in the story . Your report should include the following information . a .
When did the accident take place ? b . What was the cause of the accident ? c .

English Around Us   Reader 8

The Themes In The Readers Include Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction, Biographies, Geography, History And Several Other Subjects. The Texts Are Indian, Global, Contemporary And Classical.

Literature Circle Role Sheets

... culture in which the story takes place. 3. Create a bi-lingual dictionary that
records the non-English words and expressions from the book with their English
translations. ... Summarize the story in 100 words or less. 6. Using a Venn
diagram, ...

Literature Circle Role Sheets

As a student-centered book discussion group, literature circles foster cooperative learning.

100 Ideas for Teaching English

Keeping the alphabet on display, ask pupils to write a selection of words that are
joined in a variety of ways, such as: college, date, spoon, twist, should, jump,
teach, week and jam. Having already checked pupils' work during the exercise, ...

100 Ideas for Teaching English

'100 Ideas for Teaching English' contains 100 creative and innovative ideas for getting students engaged in all aspects of the English curriculum. Ideas range from finding the right course for you, to games to get your students engaged with the subject.

Slide and Seek 100 Words English Chinese

Colorful artwork brings the pages to life in entertaining and educational ways. Lift-the-flaps add an extra level of engagement to this book that helps pre-readers at the earliest stages of development.

Slide and Seek  100 Words English Chinese

Play slide and seek to reveal 100 new words in both English and Mandarin Chinese with this larger format board book. With multiple tabs to pull and flaps to lift, countless surprises await young learners in Slide and Seek: 100 Words English-Chinese. Each page of this larger format board book contains a single pull tab that reveals the English and Mandarin Chinese versions of a word. Colorful artwork brings the pages to life in entertaining and educational ways. Lift-the-flaps add an extra level of engagement to this book that helps pre-readers at the earliest stages of development. Every spread includes a visual puzzle!