Dombey and Son

Dombey and Son

This tale of Paul Dombey, his son (also named Paul) and his daughter Florence was first published in installments, between 1846 and 1848. Though called Dombey and Son, the story is as much about Mr. Dombey's relationship with Florence, the damage done to it by Dombey's pursuit of worldly success and accomplishment, and their eventual reconciliation. Dombey and Son is one of Dickens' richest novels, with vividly drawn characters and biting social commentary. This is a free digital copy of a book that has been carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. To make this print edition available as an ebook, we have extracted the text using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology and submitted it to a review process to ensure its accuracy and legibility across different screen sizes and devices. Google is proud to partner with libraries to make this book available to readers everywhere.

The Story of Little Dombey and Other Performance Fictions

The Story of Little Dombey and Other Performance Fictions

It is widely known that Charles Dickens gave public readings of his works, and that those readings were enormously popular. Far less well known are the stories themselves; these were not, as is the modern fashion, taken verbatim from the published novels. Instead, Dickens trimmed, reworded, and re-shaped material from the novels to create stories that would be self-contained artistic entities. These concise “performance fictions,” shaped in every way to be accessible to a broad audience, are in many ways an ideal introduction to Dickens’s work for the modern reader. Four of the most successful of these short works have been selected for this volume, including “The Story of Little Dombey” (perhaps the most emotionally affecting of all the readings, and described by Dickens as his “greatest triumph everywhere”) and the violent and suspenseful “Sikes and Nancy” (Dickens’s overpowering performances of which were said to have contributed to his death). Provided in the contextual materials is a selection of reviews and contemporary descriptions that comment on Dickens’s manner of performance and audience reception. A brief excerpt from Dombey and Son is also included, illustrating the extensive revision process that led to “The Story of Little Dombey.”

Master Humphrey's Clock

New Christmas Stories, General Index of Characters and Their Appearances, Familiar Sayings from Dickens's Works

Master Humphrey's Clock


Charles Dickens in Context

Charles Dickens in Context

Charles Dickens, a man so representative of his age as to have become considered synonymous with it, demands to be read in context. This book illuminates the worlds - social, political, economic and artistic - in which Dickens worked. Dickens's professional life encompassed work as a novelist, journalist, editor, public reader and passionate advocate of social reform. This volume offers a detailed treatment of Dickens in each of these roles, exploring the central features of Dickens's age, work and legacy, and uncovering sometimes surprising faces of the man and of the range of Dickens industries. Through 45 digestible short chapters written by a leading expert on each topic, a rounded picture emerges of Dickens's engagement with his time, the influence of his works and the ways he has been read, adapted and re-imagined from the nineteenth century to the present.

Charles Dickens's Dombey and Son

An Annotated Bibliography

Charles Dickens's Dombey and Son

This annotated bibliography of Dickens's Dombey and Son carefully analyzes almost 900 individual items, documenting the novel's composition and publication, as well as its popular and critical standing. In addition to examining the text, it assess reviews and the reactions of contemporaries.

Charles Dickens and the Sciences of Childhood

Popular Medicine, Child Health and Victorian Culture

Charles Dickens and the Sciences of Childhood

This book takes a fresh look at childhood in Dickens' works and in Victorian science and culture more generally. It offers a new way of understanding Dickens' interest in childhood by showing how his fascination with new scientific ideas about childhood and practices of scientific inquiry shaped his narrative techniques and aesthetic imagination.

Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama

Volume IV

Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama

Originally published in 1892, "the object of this Handbook is to supply readers and speakers with a lucid, but very brief account of such names as are used in allusions and references, whether by poets or prose writers; - to furnish those who consult it with the plot of popular dramas, the story of epic poems, and the outline of well-known tales. The number of dramatic plots sketched out is many hundreds. Another striking and interesting feature of the book is the revelation of the source from which dramatists and romancers have derived their stories, and the strange repetitions of historic incidents. It has been borne in mind throughout that it is not enough to state a fact. It must be stated attractively, and the character described must be drawn characteristically if the reader is to appreciate it, and feel an interest in what he reads." This work, an American reprint of The Reader's Handbook by E. Cobham Brewer, ..".while retaining all of the original material that can interest and aid the English-speaking student, gives also 'characters and sketches found in American novels, poetry and drama.'"