The Heart of the Story

Discover Your Life Within the Grand Epic of God's Story Randy Frazee. 1. Quoted in Steve Israel, ed., Charge! History's Greatest Military Speeches (Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2013), 203. 2. Numbers 13:31 (The Story, p. 75).

The Heart of the Story

The Heart of the Story will help you see God’s Word in a new and inspiring light. In the Bible’s seemingly disconnected stories, you’ll discover one grand, unfolding epic – God’s story from Genesis onward – and your own life-story contained within it. “To understand the Bible,” says author and pastor Randy Frazee, “you need bifocal lenses, because two perspectives are involved. The Lower Story, our story, is actually many stories of men and women interacting with God in the daily course of life. The Upper Story is God’s story, the tale of his great, overarching purpose that fits all the individual stories together like panels in one unified mural.” In this new edition, Randy dives deeper in the Upper and Lower stories and shows how both perspectives will open your eyes to the richness and relevance of the Bible. Illuminating God’s master-plan from Genesis to our daily lives, The Heart of the Story will encourage you to experience the joy that comes from aligning your stories with God’s.

Missing Half the Story

Perhaps this is based on the belief that these stories will touch a chord with their educated middleclass readers, viewers and advertisers more than the crime story that is rural or tribal, or peopled with “poor” or lowcaste characters.

Missing  Half the Story

Toilets, trees and gender? Can there be a connection? Is there a gender angle to a business story? Is gender in politics only about how many women get elected to parliament? Is osteoporosis a women's disease? Why do more women die in natural disasters? These are not the questions journalists usually ask when they set out to do their jobs as reporters, sub-editors, photographers of editors. Yet, by not asking, are they missing out on something, perhaps half the story? This is the question this book, edited and written by journalists, for journalists and the lay public interested in media, raises. Through examples from the media, and from their own experience, the contributors explain the concept of gender-sensitive journalism and look at a series of subjects that journalists have to cover - sexual assault, environment, development, business, politics, health, disasters, conflict - and set out a simple way of integrating a gendered lens into day-to-day journalism. Written in a non-academic, accessible style, this book is possibly the first of its kind in India - one that attempts to inject a gender perspective into journalism. Published by Zubaan.

The End of the Story

Story. by. Lydia. Davis. “Passion and regret, writing and revision, the impossibility of describing, or even remembering, love—these themes animate Lydia Davis's brilliantly original, funny, wise,andquietly bravenew novel.

The End of the Story

The End of the Story is an energetic, candid, and funny novel about an enduring obsession and a woman's attempt to control it by the telling of the story of it. With ruthless honesty, artful analysis, and crystalline depictions of human and natural landscapes, Lydia Davis's novel offers a compelling illumination of the dilemmas of loss and the process of remembering.

The Story of Ireland

National "stories," however, no less than histories, gain a gravity, it must be remembered, and even at times a solemnity from their subject apart altogether from their treatment. A good reader will read a great deal more into them than ...

The Story of Ireland

"It seems to be certain," says the Abbé McGeoghehan, "that Ireland continued uninhabited from the Creation to the Deluge." With this assurance to help us on our onward way I may venture to supplement it by saying that little is known about the first, or even about the second, third, and fourth succession of settlers in Ireland. At what precise period what is known as the Scoto-Celtic branch of the great Aryan stock broke away from its parent tree, by what route its migrants travelled, in what degree of consanguinity it stood to the equally Celtic race or races of Britain, what sort of people inhabited Ireland previous to the first Aryan invasion--all this is in the last degree uncertain, though that it was inhabited by some race or races outside the limits of that greatest of human groups seems from ethnological evidence to be perfectly clear. When first it dawns upon us through that thick darkness which hangs about the birth of all countries--whatever their destiny--it was a densely wooded and scantily peopled island "lying a-loose," as old Campion, the Elizabethan historian, tells us, "upon the West Ocean," though his further assertion that "in shape it resembleth an egg, plain on the sides, and not reaching forth to the sea in nooks and elbows of Land as Brittaine doeth"--cannot be said to be quite geographically accurate--the last part of the description referring evidently to the east coast, the only one with which, like most of his countrymen, he was at that time familiar. Geographically, then, and topographically it was no doubt in much the same state as the greater part of it remained up to the middle or end of the sixteenth century, a wild, tangled, roadless land, that is to say, shaggy with forests, abounding in streams, abounding, too, in lakes--far more, doubtless, than at present, drainage and other causes having greatly reduced their number--with rivers bearing the never-failing tribute of the skies to the sea, yet not so thoroughly as to hinder enormous districts from remaining in a swamped and saturated condition, given up to the bogs, which even at the present time are said to cover nearly one-sixth of its surface.

The Story of Surnames and Geneaology

He was naturally interested in the story of the Creation and the lives of the early Patriarchs as told in the book of Genesis. The stories of Abel and Samson moved him to pity and sorrow. The exploits of Joshua and David stirred his ...

The Story of Surnames and Geneaology

Originally published London 1932, this fascinating book takes an in-depth look at surnames and geneology, and will prove a fantastic reference book to anyone studying the subjects. Contents include: Local Names; Address Surnames; Patronymics; Prophets, Martyrs, Warriors; Matronymics; Names from Miracle Plays; Fourteenth Century London; Nicknames; Names from Pastimes; Nicknames from Dispositions; Foreign Names; Craftsmen and Officials; Teutonic Surnames; American Surnames; Index of Surnames. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Anna Howard Shaw the Story of a Pioneer

Please come and see me very often— and tell me stories!” After that I collected stories for Relief. One of those which most amused her, I remember, was about my horse, ... We saw the animal and liked it; I34 T H E STORY OF A PIONEER.

Anna Howard Shaw  the Story of a Pioneer

Anna Howard Shaw: The Story of a Pioneer is one of the classic autobiographies of American letters. A leader in the church as well as the suffrage movement, an M.D. as well as a powerful and eloquent lecturer, Anna Howard Shaw (1847-1919) was a close associate of Susan B. Anthony and the first woman to receive the United States Distinguished Service Medal. Born in England, Shaw immigrated to the United States as a child and in 1880 became the first woman ordained as a Methodist preacher. She subsequently left the pulpit to serve as president of the National American Suffrage Association--and later, as head of the Women's Committee of the Council of National Defense during World War I. Leontine T. C. Kelly was the first woman African American bishop in the United Methodist church. She retired in 1988.

Bannertail The Story of a Graysquirrel

Bannertail  The Story of a Graysquirrel

Bannertail, The Story of a Graysquirrel THAT year the nut crop was a failure. This was the off-year for the red oaks; they bear only every other season. The white oaks had been nipped by a late frost. The beech-trees were very scarce, and the chestnuts were gone—the blight had taken them all. Pignut hickories were not plentiful, and the very best of all, the sweet shag-hickory, had suffered like the white oaks. October, the time of the nut harvest, came. Dry leaves were drifting to the ground, and occasional "thumps" told of big fat nuts that also were falling, sometimes of themselves and sometimes cut by harvesters; for, although no other Graysquirrel was to be seen, Bannertail was not alone. A pair of Redsquirrels was there and half a dozen Chipmunks searching about for the scattering precious nuts. Their methods were very different from those of the Graysquirrel race. The Chipmunks were carrying off the prizes in their cheek-pouches to underground storehouses. The Redsquirrels were hurrying away with their loads to distant hollow trees, a day's gathering in one tree. The Graysquirrels' way is different. With them each nut is buried in the ground, three or four inches deep, one nut at each place. A very precise essential instinct it is that regulates this plan. It is inwrought with the very making of the Graysquirrel race. Yet in Bannertail it was scarcely functioning at all. Even the strongest inherited habit needs a starter. How does a young chicken learn to peck? It has a strong inborn readiness to do it, but we know that that impulse must be stimulated at first by seeing the mother peck, or it will not function. In an incubator it is necessary to have a sophisticated chicken as a leader, or the chickens of the machine foster-mother will die, not knowing how to feed. Nevertheless, the instinct is so strong that a trifle will arouse it to take control. Yes, so small a trifle as tapping on the incubator floor with a pencil-point will tear the flimsy veil, break the restraining bond and set the life-preserving instinct free. Like this chicken, robbed of its birthright by interfering man, was Bannertail in his blind yielding to a vague desire to hide the nuts. He had never seen it done, the example of the other nut-gatherers was not helpful—was bewildering, indeed. Confused between the inborn impulse and the outside stimulus of example, Bannertail would seize a nut, strip off the husk, and hide it quickly anywhere. Some nuts he would thrust under bits of brush or tufts of grass; some he buried by dropping leaves and rubbish over them, and a few, toward the end, he hid by digging a shallow hole. But the real, well-directed, energetic instinct to hide nut after nut, burying them three good inches, an arm's length, underground, was far from being aroused, was even hindered by seeing the Redsquirrels and the Chipmunks about him bearing away their stores, without attempting to bury them at all. So the poor, skimpy harvest was gathered. What was not carried off was hidden by the trees themselves under a layer of dead and fallen leaves. High above, in an old red oak, Bannertail[37] found a place where a broken limb had let the weather in, so the tree was rotted. Digging out the soft wood left an ample cave, which he gnawed and garnished into a warm and weather-proof home. The bright, sharp days of autumn passed. The leaves were on the ground throughout the woods in noisy dryness and lavish superabundance. The summer birds had gone, and the Chipmunk, oversensitive to the crispness of the mornings, had bowed sedately on November 1, had said his last "good-by," and had gone to sleep. Thus one more voice was hushed, the feeling of the woods was "Hush, be still!"—was all-expectant of some new event, that the tentacles of high-strung wood-folk sensed and appraised as sinister. Backward they shrank, to hide away and wait.

Expansion Innovation The Story of Western Engineering 1954 1999

It is through these stories and pictures the history is able to come alive and adds flavour and meaning to the events. Unfortunately, there was not room for everything to be included and hopefully many wonderful stories will remain ...

Expansion   Innovation  The Story of Western Engineering 1954 1999

Western Engineering has earned an international reputation for conducting leading-edge research and offering university students unique learning opportunities. However, the faculty faced many challenges - and celebrated many successes - during its first 45 years. From starting as a department at The University of Western Ontario, to becoming a faculty with graduate programs and research centres and institutes, this history is brought to life through the memories of faculty members, staff and alumni who helped shape the faculty and build its reputation at the local, national and international level. The five academic leaders who guided the Faculty of Engineering Science through this period offered stability through challenging times and fiscal hardships, as well as adapted to societal needs. The growth of the faculty during the first 45 years is a credit to this leadership and the dedication of faculty and staff members, students and alumni.

The Story Writer

be writer indignantly certain that worth in fiction is being overlooked in favor of distinguished names, and ready, with small encouragement, to point out, in any issue of any magazine, stories far inferior to the ones he impatiently ...

The Story Writer


The Story Re told

“ Our Story . " The Co - operative Union Limited , , Manchester , 1921 ( revised edition ) . OWEN , ROBERT.- “ Life of Robert Owen , by Himself . ” Bell , London , 1919 . PEAPLES , F. W .-- “ The History of the Great and Little Bolton ...

The Story Re told


Changing the Story

Chapter 2, "Women Writing in the Twentieth Century: The Novel and Social Change," historicizes feminist fiction of the sixties and seventies. I posit a relationship between the backlash against feminism that occurred after the first ...

Changing the Story

Offers an account of the differences between the American, Canadian, British, and French attitudes towards feminism and feminist fiction and literary theory. This work tracks how feminist novelists draw upon, and negotiate with traditional narrative patterns, and how their critical approach implicates, and provokes, social change.

The Story Behind Great Books

... the Story of J.M.B. The Story of the World's Literature Nobel Prize Winners *Invincible Louisa Rebellious Puritan Lewis Carroll Herman Melville Marian Women Who Make Our Novels *Life of Robert Louis Stevenson *Boys' Life of Mark ...

The Story Behind Great Books


The Story of Cancer

David Nicholas Schaffer. I I THE STORY OF CANCER Other non-fiction stories, now in preparation,

The Story of Cancer


The Story of Insulin

However, the Editor, who initiated the writing of this book, has done much to integrate the style and presentation of the story. The authors are indebted to many people in all regions of the world for their contributions, ...

The Story of Insulin


The Story of Engineering

... JAMES K. The Story of Engineering A214 FLORES, ANGEL (Ed.) An Anthology of French Poetry A134 An Anthology of German Poetry A197 1 Nineteenth Century German Tales A184 FLORNOY, BERTRAND The World of the Inca A137 FORTUNE, ...

The Story of Engineering


The Story of the Bridge

In this matter of animal fords , a “ St . Christopher " story from Lapland may be significant ; according to this , our Lord asked the horse to carry him across a great river but was refused , whereupon the bear did so — “ So the Lord ...

The Story of the Bridge


The Story of a Novel

The Genesis of Doctor Faustus Thomas Mann. “ ... The Story of a Novel THOMAS MANN The Story of.

The Story of a Novel

The great German author recounts the events, and the process of reflection, that contributed to the creation of his novel connecting the degeneracy of conscience under Nazism with the Faust myth.

The Soul of the Story

The Soul of the Story: Meetings with Remarkable People 2006 First Printing © 2006 by David Zeller All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or reprinted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, ...

The Soul of the Story

Shares stories about the part each teacher played in integrating mind and heart, body and soul, psychology and religion, west and east, matter and spirit, theory and experience, and how each teaching became the stepping stone to reclaiming his own spiritual tradition. $15,000 first printing.

The Story of Winston Churchill

Even as a child she was busy writing stories and putting on plays with the youngsters of the neighborhood. She has always had a deep interest in history and science, and has traveled extensively throughout the United States, Mexico, ...

The Story of Winston Churchill


The Story of Rock n Roll

One of the best things about The Story of Rock V Roll is that it establishes the history of rock 'n ' roll music and thereby gives us a brief glimpse of its effect on the lives of young people as they struggled with growing up.

The Story of Rock  n  Roll

Traces the history of rock and roll music from the 1950's to the present day and discusses its changing styles and leading personalities.