The Study of Language in England 1780 1860

The description for this book, Study of Language in England, will be forthcoming.

The Study of Language in England  1780 1860

The description for this book, Study of Language in England, will be forthcoming.

Aryans and British India

that there was a richness and force in the original to which no known language but the Greek could do justice " ( 1827 : 126-127n . ) . Some years ago Hans Aarsleff wrote a fascinating book , The study of language in England , 1780-1860 ...

Aryans and British India

"Aryan," a word that today evokes images of racial hatred and atrocity, was first used by Europeans to suggest bonds of kinship, as Thomas Trautmann shows in his far-reaching history of British Orientalism and the ethnology of India. When the historical relationship uniting Sanskrit with the languages of Europe was discovered, it seemed clear that Indians and Britons belonged to the same family. Thus the Indo-European or Aryan idea, based on the principle of linguistic kinship, dominated British ethnological inquiry. In the nineteenth century, however, an emergent biological "race science" attacked the authority of the Orientalists. The spectacle of a dark-skinned people who were evidently civilized challenged Victorian ideas, and race science responded to the enigma of India by redefining the Aryan concept in narrowly "white" racial terms. By the end of the nineteenth century, race science and Orientalism reached a deep and lasting consensus in regard to India, which Trautmann calls "the racial theory of Indian civilization," and which he undermines with his powerful analysis of colonial ethnology in India. His work of reassessing British Orientalism and the Aryan idea will be of great interest to historians, anthropologists, and cultural critics.

The Study of Language in England 1780 1860

The study of language in England , 1780-1860 . Reprint of the ed . published by Princeton University Press , Princeton , N.J. Includes bibliographical references and index . 1 . Linguistic research -- Great Britain -- History . 2 .

The Study of Language in England  1780 1860


History of Linguistics 2005

Selected Papers from the Tenth International Conference on History of the Language Sciences (ICHOLS X), 1-5 September 2005, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois Douglas A. Kibbee ... The Study of Language in England , 1780-1860 .

History of Linguistics 2005

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William Dwight Whitney and the Science of Language

William Hazlitt quoted in Hans Aarsleff,The Study of Language in England, 17801860 (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1967), 71. The Anglican churchman and philologist R. C. Trench noted the intellectual stimulation ...

William Dwight Whitney and the Science of Language

This exploration of an early phase of scientific language study provides readers with a unique perspective on Victorian intellectual life as well as on the transatlantic roots of modern linguistic theory.

The Science of Religion in Britain 1860 1915

From Locke to Saussure: Essays on the Study of Language and Intellectual History. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1982. ———. The Study ofLanguage in England, 17801860. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1967.

The Science of Religion in Britain  1860   1915

Marjorie Wheeler-Barclay argues that, although the existence and significance of the science of religion has been barely visible to modern scholars of the Victorian period, it was a subject of lively and extensive debate among nineteenth-century readers and audiences. She shows how an earlier generation of scholars in Victorian Britain attempted to arrive at a dispassionate understanding of the psychological and social meanings of religious beliefs and practices—a topic not without contemporary resonance in a time when so many people feel both empowered and threatened by religious passion—and provides the kind of history she feels has been neglected. Wheeler-Barclay examines the lives and work of six scholars: Friedrich Max Müller, Edward B. Tylor, Andrew Lang, William Robertson Smith, James G. Frazer, and Jane Ellen Harrison. She illuminates their attempts to create a scholarly, non-apologetic study of religion and religions that drew upon several different disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, the classics, and Oriental studies, and relied upon contributions from those outside as well as within the universities. This intellectual enterprise—variously known as comparative religion, the history of religions, or the science of religion—was primarily focused on non-Christian religions. Yet in Wheeler-Barclay’s study of the history of this field within the broad contexts of Victorian cultural, intellectual, social, and political history, she traces the links between the emergence of the science of religion to debates about Christianity and to the history of British imperialism, the latter of which made possible the collection of so much of the ethnographic data on which the scholars relied and which legitimized exploration and conquest. Far from promoting an anti-religious or materialistic agenda, the science of religion opened up cultural space for an exploration of religion that was not constricted by the terms of contemporary conflicts over Darwin and the Bible and that made it possible to think in new and more flexible ways about the very definition of religion.

Language and Earth

Effective Affinities Between the Emerging Sciences of Linguistics and Geology Bernd Naumann, Frans Plank, Gottfried Hofbauer ... Aarsleff, Hans. 1967. The Study of Language in England. 17801860. Princeton. Andersen, Lorin. (1982).

Language and Earth

In former times, the study of language was rarely pursued in isolation, and many of the other intellectual concerns that used to be intertwined with language study have long been on the record of historians of linguistics. The present volume is the first to probe into an association of linguistics that has so far been neglected: that with the study of the earth. The relations between linguistics and geology were intimate and manifold as both sciences were emerging in the 18th and 19th century. Highlighted in the contributions to this volume are biographical and institutional contacts, the joint interest in origins and very early developments and in the proper methods of acquiring knowledge about these, common structural and evolutionary concepts, and analogous problems in the classification of domains as fuzzy as languages and rocks.

Approaches to Teaching the History of the English Language

The Study of Language in England, 17801860. 2nd ed. Minneapolis: Minneapolis University Press, 1983. Aarts, Bas. “In Defence of Distributional Analysis.” Studies in Language 31 (2007): 431–43. Achebe, Chinua. Arrow of God.

Approaches to Teaching the History of the English Language

-First Edition published in Paperback 2001.-

Liminal Semiotics

Sir William Jones should also be added because of his influence on the 'quasi empirical' study of oriental languages. See Hans Aarsleff, The Study of Language in England, 17801860 (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1983) 127.

Liminal Semiotics

Grenzen, ihre Überschreitung, ihre Auflösung und ihre Wiederherstellung sind ein bisher nicht systematisch erforschtes Schlüsselkonzept für das Verständnis romantischer Literatur. Diese semiotisch-komparatistische Grundsatzstudie analysiert über drei Kulturräume hinweg vergleichend eine Vielfalt heterogener literarischer Entgrenzungsphänomene in der Romantik und entwickelt auf der Basis der romantischen Zeichentheorie ein Modell für die Analyse transepochaler Entgrenzungsphänomene. Dabei geht sie über bekannte Konzepte des paradoxen Subjekts hinaus, indem Entgrenzung als Interdependenz von Subjekt, Raum und Zeichen umfassend in detaillierten Lektüren literarischer Texte aus Deutschland, den USA und Großbritannien sowie in theoretischen Exkursen untersucht wird - von Novalis und Coleridge über Melville bis hin zu Deleuze und Guattari. Die Arbeit ist somit nicht nur ein Beitrag zur Romantikforschung, sondern lotet auch die methodologischen Möglichkeiten derselben neu aus. Die Studie wurde 2012 mit dem von der Ernst-Reuter-Gesellschaft der Freunde, Förderer und Ehemaligen der Freien Universität Berlin e.V. gestifteten Ernst-Reuter-Preis als herausragende und zukunftsweisende Promotionsarbeit ausgezeichnet. Boundaries constitute a key concept in Romanticism: their transgression, their elimination, but also their reconstruction. By analyzing the triad of sign, subject, and space, this study provides a comprehensive analysis of boundaries in German, English, and American Romanticism. Its trans-epochal approach reveals a shared dynamic of a multiplicity of heterogeneous boundary phenomena ranging from the late 18th century to postmodern Romantic texts and constructs a model for the examination of limits: a theory of a-limitation. The known concept of the transgressive Romantic subject is integrated into this triadic model whose primordial site of a-limitation, however, is the semiotics of Romanticism. With a creative theoretical design that allows the reader to survey readings of individual texts as well as broader theoretical frameworks, "Liminal Semiotics" offers a new perspective on a variety of literary texts and theories ranging from Novalis and Coleridge to Melville and finally to Deleuze and Guattari. The thesis was awarded the Ernst-Reuter-Prize 2012 for outstanding dissertations at Freie Universität Berlin.

Victorian Interpretation

For considerations of the study of language and philology in the Victorian period, see Hans Aarsleff's fine book The Study of Language in England, 17801860 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1967); Aarsleff, From Locke to ...

Victorian Interpretation

Suzy Anger investigates the relationship of Victorian interpretation to the ways in which literary criticism is practiced today. Her primary focus is literary interpretation, but she also considers fields such as legal theory, psychology, history, and the natural sciences in order to establish the pervasiveness of hermeneutic thought in Victorian culture. Anger's book demonstrates that much current thought on interpretation has its antecedents in the Victorians, who were already deeply engaged with the problems of interpretation that concern literary theorists today. Anger traces the development and transformation of interpretive theory from a religious to a secular (and particularly literary) context. She argues that even as hermeneutic theory was secularized in literary interpretation it carried in its practice some of the religious implications with which the tradition began. She further maintains that, for the Victorians, theories of interpretation are often connected to ethical principles and suggests that all theories of interpretation may ultimately be grounded in ethical theories. Beginning with an examination of Victorian biblical exegesis, in the work of figures such as Benjamin Jowett, John Henry Newman, and Matthew Arnold, the book moves to studies of Thomas Carlyle, George Eliot, and Oscar Wilde. Emphasizing the extent to which these important writers are preoccupied with hermeneutics, Anger also shows that consideration of their thought brings to light questions and qualifications of some of the assumptions of contemporary criticism.

Science Language and Reform in Victorian Poetry

The Study of Language in England, 17801860. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1967. ———. From Locke to Saussure: Essays on the Study of Language and Intellectual History. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1982.

Science  Language  and Reform in Victorian Poetry

Barrow’s timely book is the first to examine the link between Victorian poetry, the study of language, and political reform. Focusing on a range of literary, scientific, and political texts, Barrow demonstrates that nineteenth-century debates about language played a key role in shaping emergent ideas about popular sovereignty. While Victorian scientists studied the origins of speech, the history of dialects, and the barrier between human and animal language, poets such as Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Alfred Tennyson, and Thomas Hardy drew on this research to explore social unrest, the expansion of the electorate, and the ever-widening boundaries of empire. Science, Language, and Reform in Victorian Poetry recovers unacknowledged links between poetry, philology, and political culture, and contributes to recent movements in literary studies that combine historicist and formalist approaches.

Contemporary Research in Romance Linguistics

Papers from the 22nd Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages, El Paso/Cd. Juárez, February 1992 Jon Amastae . 1562a. Verae brevesque grammatices Latinae institutiones. ... The study of language in England, 1780-1860. Princeton UP.

Contemporary Research in Romance Linguistics

This volume contains 23 papers selected from those presented at the 22nd Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages. The papers address issues in phonology, morphology, syntax/semantics from contemporary theoretical perspectives. In addition, in keeping with the symposium's US-Mexico location and commemoration of the twin quincentenaries of Columbus' first voyage and the publication of Nebrija's grammar, several papers focus on the history of linguistic theory, language contact, variation, and change.

Manners Morals and Class in England 1774 1858

See also Armstrong and Tennenhouse (eds), The Ideology of Conduct for studies of behavioural literature for women. ... The Study of Language in England, 17801860 (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1967) for a discussion of the ...

Manners  Morals and Class in England  1774 1858

This book analyses English social and occupational behavioural ideals from the courtesy book's demise in 1774 to the Medical Act's passage in 1858. Ideals from conduct and etiquette books mix gracefully with those displayed by professional groups, particularly medical practitioners, in an analysis that challenges conventional thinking about class and social change in early-industrial England. Dr Morgan's study will be essential reading for British historians, as well as for all those interested in how individuals establish personal identity and infuse confidence into human relations in an impersonal, urban society.

The Idea of Progress in Eighteenth century Britain

Hans Aarsleff's The Study of Language in England , 1780-1860 ( Princeton , 1967 ) includes some material on the pre - 1780 background , mainly of a philosophical nature , although it focuses primarily on John Horne Tooke's Diversions of ...

The Idea of Progress in Eighteenth century Britain

The idea of progress stood at the very center of the intellectual world of eighteenth-century Britain, closely linked to every major facet of the British Enlightenment as well as to the economic revolutions of the period. Drawing on hundreds of eighteenth-century books and pamphlets, David Spadafora here provides the most extensive discussion ever written of this prevailing sense of historical optimism.

Biosemiotic Perspectives on Language and Linguistics

The study of language in England 17801860. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Alter, S. G. (1999). Darwinism and the linguistic image: Language, race and natural theology in the nineteenth century. Baltimore/London: Johns Hopkins ...

Biosemiotic Perspectives on Language and Linguistics

The first international volume on the topic of biosemiotics and linguistics. It aims to establish a new relationship between linguistics and biology as based on shared semiotic foundation.

Birds in Eighteenth Century Literature

Hans Aarsleff, The Study of Language in England, 17801860 (Connecticut: Greenswood, 1967), 3. 19. Olivia Smith, The Politics of Language: 1791–1819 (Oxford: Clarendon, 1986), 22. 20. James Harris, Hermes; Or, A Philosophical Inquiry ...

Birds in Eighteenth Century Literature

This book examines literary representations of birds from across the world in anage of expanding European colonialism. It offers important new perspectives intothe ways birds populate and generate cultural meaning in a variety of literary andnon-literary genres from 1700–1840 as well as throughout a broad range ofecosystems and bioregions. It considers a wide range of authors, including someof the most celebrated figures in eighteenth-century literature such as John Gay,Henry Fielding, Laurence Sterne, Anna Letitia Barbauld, William Cowper, MaryWollstonecraft, Thomas Bewick, Charlotte Smith, William Wordsworth, andGilbert White. ignwogwog[p

The Oxford Handbook of European Romanticism

This survey takes a synchronic approach which identifies key notions about the nature and workings of language and their ... 1982) and The Study of Language in England: 17801860 (Minneapolis and London: Minnesota University Press and ...

The Oxford Handbook of European Romanticism

The Oxford Handbook to European Romanticism is a guide to European Romanticism written for an English-speaking audience. It finishes with a chapter on the European Romantic attitude to Britain. The authors are all expert in the original languages of the writers and topics which they discuss. European Romanticism sits in an epochal period full of historical excitement, beginning with the French Revolution and extending to the uprisings of 1848 acrossEurope. It witnessed what was arguably the first world war, against Napoleon, and the post-Napoleonic settlement at the Congress of Vienna which shaped the Europe which lasted until the Great War. Germany'sgreatest writer, Goethe, and Russia's, Pushkin, lived during this time. Other writers from different countries are comparably important - Mme de Staël, the founder of the sociology of literature and the original cultural commentator in her book On Germany; Giacomo Leopardi, the second greatest Italian poet after Dante; Victor Hugo, greates French writer of the 19th century, hélas, and many others.

George Perkins Marsh Prophet of Conservation

1860 . 14. George Ticknor , Life of William Hickling Prescott ( Boston , 1864 ) , 150n ; George Bancroft to GPM , 4 July ... Norton Papers ; Hans Aarsleff , The Study of Language in England , 17801860 ( Princeton : Princeton University ...

George Perkins Marsh  Prophet of Conservation

George Perkins Marsh (1801-1882) was the first to reveal the menace of environmental misuse, to explain its causes, and to prescribe reforms. His seminal book Man and Nature is famed for its ecological acumen. The clue to its inception lies in Marsh's many-sided engagement in the life of his time. An acclaimed linguist, lawyer, congressman, and diplomat, he served 25 years as U.S. envoy to Turkey and to Italy. He helped found and guide the Smithsonian Institution, penned potent tracts on fisheries and on irrigation, spearheaded public science, art, and architecture. He wrote on camels and corporate corruption, Icelandic grammar and Alpine glaciers. His pungent and provocative letters illuminate life on both sides of the Atlantic.

John Wilkins and 17th Century British Linguistics

B. Secondary Sources Aarsleff, Hans. 1967. The Study of Language in England 1780-1860. Princeton: Princeton Univ. Press. -------- --. 1970. “The History of Linguistics and Professor Chomsky”. Language 46.570-585. -------- --. 1983.

John Wilkins and 17th Century British Linguistics

In this reader, 19 articles have been collected that bring out the central position of John Wilkins and his Essay Toward a Real Character, and a Philosophical Language (1668) in the history of ideas in 17th-century Britain.

Nineteenth Century Science

From Locke to Saussure: Essays on the Study of Language and Intellectual History. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1982. —. The Study of Language in England, 17801860. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1967. Beer, Gillian.

Nineteenth Century Science

Nineteenth-Century Science is a science anthology which provides over 30 selections from original 19th-century scientific monographs, textbooks and articles written by such authors as Charles Darwin, Mary Somerville, J.W. Goethe, John Dalton, Charles Lyell and Hermann von Helmholtz. The volume surveys scientific discovery and thought from Jean-Baptiste Lamarck’s theory of evolution of 1809 to the isolation of radium by Marie and Pierre Curie in 1898. Each selection opens with a biographical introduction, situating each scientist and discovery within the context of history and culture of the period. Each entry is also followed by a list of further suggested reading on the topic. A broad range of technical and popular material has been included, from Mendeleev’s detailed description of the periodic table to Faraday’s highly accessible lecture for young people on the chemistry of a burning candle. The anthology will be of interest to the general reader who would like to explore in detail the scientific, cultural, and intellectual development of the nineteenth-century, as well as to students and teachers who specialize in the science, literature, history, or sociology of the period. The book provides examples from all the disciplines of western science-chemistry, physics, medicine, astronomy, biology, evolutionary theory, etc. The majority of the entries consist of complete, unabridged journal articles or book chapters from original 19th-century scientific texts.