Murder Down Under

“Say, Bony, are you interested in murder?” It was seldom Bony was trapped into visible astonishment. On this occasion it must be said in his defence that his mind was not then employed by the subject of homicide.

Murder Down Under

With "Murder Down Under", Australian mystery writer Arthur W. (William) Upfield (1890-1964) introduces his half-Aborigine sleuth, Det.-Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte (Bony), whose conscientious and exhaustive investigation of the disappearance of a Western Australia farmer unearths murder and a mysterious, amateur criminologist ... Bony's masquerade as a worker on the Fence brings in quality re-creation of the wheat lands, farmers, pubs, dances, and the people of the land down under ...

The Subject of Murder

Drawing on the work of Foucault in her studies of the lives and crimes of killers in Europe and the United States, Downing interrogates the meanings of media and texts produced about and by murderers.

The Subject of Murder

The subject of murder has always held a particular fascination for us. But, since at least the nineteenth century, we have seen the murderer as different from the ordinary citizen—a special individual, like an artist or a genius, who exists apart from the moral majority, a sovereign self who obeys only the destructive urge, sometimes even commanding cult followings. In contemporary culture, we continue to believe that there is something different and exceptional about killers, but is the murderer such a distinctive type? Are they degenerate beasts or supermen as they have been depicted on the page and the screen? Or are murderers something else entirely? In The Subject of Murder, Lisa Downing explores the ways in which the figure of the murderer has been made to signify a specific kind of social subject in Western modernity. Drawing on the work of Foucault in her studies of the lives and crimes of killers in Europe and the United States, Downing interrogates the meanings of media and texts produced about and by murderers. Upending the usual treatment of murderers as isolated figures or exceptional individuals, Downing argues that they are ordinary people, reflections of our society at the intersections of gender, agency, desire, and violence.

Trial of Charles M Jefferds for Murder at New York December 1861

They proved that Jefferds , on the Sunday after the murder , commenced a conversation on the subject of murders , and asked him what he thought of the New Jersey poisoning case — the case of Harden -- who , while his wife was in his lap ...

Trial of Charles M  Jefferds for Murder  at New York  December  1861

John Walton and John W. Matthews were murdered June 30, 1860. In July, 1861, Charles M. Jefferds was tried for the murder of Walton and acquitted. In December, 1861, he was tried in the Court of General Sessions for the murder of Matthews.

Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of the State of Montana from December Term 1868 to

of the indictment of what degree the murder was , because murder being charged the jury are , by their verdict ... The legislature , in adopting this statute , and enacting the common law upon the subject of murder , did not disturb any ...

Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of the State of Montana from December Term 1868  to


The Rise of True Crime 20th Century Murder and American Popular Culture

Lesser, Wendy. Pictures at an Execution: An Inquiry into the Subject of Murder. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1993. Levin, Meyer. Compulsion. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1956. Malcolm, Janet. The Journalist and the Murderer.

The Rise of True Crime  20th Century Murder and American Popular Culture

During the 1950s and 1960s True Detective magazine developed a new way of narrating and understanding murder. It was more sensitive to context, gave more psychologically sophisticated accounts, and was more willing to make conjectures about the unknown thoughts and motivations of killers than others had been before. This turned out to be the start of a revolution, and, after a century of escalating accounts, we have now become a nation of experts, with many ordinary people able to speak intelligently about blood-spatter patterns and organized vs. disorganized serial killers. The Rise of True Crime examines the various genres of true crime using the most popular and well-known examples. And despite its examination of some of the potentially negative effects of the genre, it is written for people who read and enjoy true crime, and wish to learn more about it. With skyrocketing crime rates and the appearance of a frightening trend toward social chaos in the 1970s, books, documentaries, and fiction films in the true crime genre tried to make sense of the Charles Manson crimes and the Gary Gilmore execution events. And in the 1980s and 1990s, true crime taught pop culture consumers about forensics, profiling, and highly technical aspects of criminology. We have thus now become a nation of experts, with many ordinary people able to speak intelligently about blood-spatter patterns and organized vs. disorganized serial killers. Through the suggestion that certain kinds of killers are monstrous or outside the realm of human morality, and through the perpetuation of the stranger-danger idea, the true crime aesthetic has both responded to and fostered our culture's fears. True crime is also the site of a dramatic confrontation with the concept of evil, and one of the few places in American public discourse where moral terms are used without any irony, and notions and definitions of evil are presented without ambiguity. When seen within its historical context, true crime emerges as a vibrant and meaningful strand of popular culture, one that is unfortunately devalued as lurid and meaningless pulp.

Felony Murder

By the end of the nineteenth century, all but eight American jurisdictions (the United States, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Vermont) had legislation on the subject of homicide in the ...

Felony Murder

The felony murder doctrine is one of the most widely criticized features of American criminal law. Legal scholars almost unanimously condemn it as irrational, concluding that it imposes punishment without fault and presumes guilt without proof. Despite this, the law persists in almost every U.S. jurisdiction. Felony Murder is the first book on this controversial legal doctrine. It shows that felony murder liability rests on a simple and powerful idea: that the guilt incurred in attacking or endangering others depends on one's reasons for doing so. Inflicting harm is wrong, and doing so for a bad motive—such as robbery, rape, or arson—aggravates that wrong. In presenting this idea, Guyora Binder criticizes prevailing academic theories of criminal intent for trying to purge criminal law of moral judgment. Ultimately, Binder shows that felony murder law has been and should remain limited by its justifying aims.

Murder and Mayhem

Individuals can manifest more than one of these typologies and indeed, in some cases, arguably all five typologies apply.54 Aside from these texts however, the vast majority of literature on the subject of serial murder is much more ...

Murder and Mayhem

This introductory book offers a coherent history of twentieth century crime and the law in Britain, with chapters on topics ranging from homicide to racial hate crime, from incest to anarchism, from gangs to the death penalty. Pulling together a wide range of literature, David Nash and Anne-Marie Kilday reveal the evolution of attitudes towards criminality and the law over the course of the twentieth century. Highlighting important periods of change and development that have shaped the overall history of crime in Britain, the authors provide in-depth analysis and explanation of each theme. This is an ideal companion for undergraduate students taking courses on Crime in Britain, as well as a fascinating resource for scholars.

Murder Among Friends

also concerned with the Argonauts, and many believe that it also contained Medeia's murder of her brother Apsyrtos.77 The killing of Pelias by his daughters was the subject of two plays: Sophokles' Rhizotomoi (The Root Cutters)7° and ...

Murder Among Friends

"In Murder Among Friends, Elizabeth Belfiore supports this thesis with an in-depth examination of the crucial role of philia in Greek tragedy. Drawing on a wealth of evidence, she compares tragedy and epic, discusses the role of philia relationships within Greek literature and society, and analyzes in detail the pattern of violation of philia in five plays: Aeschylus' Suppliants, Sophocles' Philoctetes and Ajax, and Euripides' Iphigenia in Tauris and Andromache."--BOOK JACKET.

The Shooting Party A Murder Mystery

... passed over Kamyshev's face such as only an experienced eye can trace on the faces of people who seldom lie. 'What is the subject of your story?' I asked. 'The subject? What can I tell you? The subject is not new... Love and murder.

The Shooting Party  A Murder Mystery

This carefully crafted ebook: “The Shooting Party (A Murder Mystery)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Excerpt: “On an April day of the year 1880 the doorkeeper Audrey came into my private room and told me in a mysterious whisper that a gentleman had come to the editorial office and demanded insistently to see the editor. 'He appears to be a chinovnik,’ Andrey added. 'He has a cockade…’ 'Ask him to come another time,’ I said, 'I am busy today. Tell him the editor only receives on Saturdays.’ 'He was here the day before yesterday and asked for you. He says his business is urgent. He begs, almost with tears in his eyes, to see you. He says he is not free on Saturday… Will you receive him?’” (The Shooting Party, 1884) The Shooting Party is a triangular love story-cum-murder mystery novel and Chekhov’s only novel. Not many people are aware of the fact that before becoming the celebrated short story writer and playwright he tried his hands at novel writing. One can witness the birth of Chekhov’s unique style (although in its infancy) for which he would be later remembered for. Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) was a Russian physician, dramaturge and author who is often referred to as one of the seminal figures in the birth of early modernism in the theatre. He made no apologies for the difficulties he posed to the readers, insisting that the role of an artist was to ask questions, not to answer them.

A Complete Practical Treatise on Criminal Procedure Pleading and Evidence in Indictable Cases

... but before the umbilical cord was severed ; and it was submitted that a child could not be the subject of murder till it had a completely independent circulation , and had been wholly detached from the mother ; that the term “ born ...

A Complete Practical Treatise on Criminal Procedure  Pleading  and Evidence  in Indictable Cases


Reports from Committees

Q.c. in the definition of the crimes of murder and call this malice aforethought , at any rate ; the manslaughter ... and are you going to deliver this man rience on the subject would say so ) that the over to a felon's doom in the very ...

Reports from Committees


Murder Will Speak

The somewhat squeamish reviewer for Scribner's Magazine considered the subject matter ofFor MurderWill Speak 'rather unsavouryat times', yet this individual conceded that the novel neverthelessmade 'firstclass reading forthose who enjoy ...

Murder Will Speak

Thief, criminal and probably a coward, would Hyson have had the courage to kill himself or did someone catch up with him? Did his death have anything to do with Mrs Telford, who committed suicide shortly before? The Inspector, anticipating a routine investigation, finds conflicting stories, poison pen letters, and damning information about Hyson. It takes Sir Clinton Driffield to untangle the case and prove that the cast-iron alibi is the one which should arouse suspicion.

A Treatise on the Law of Homicide in the United States

117 , the question is on the subject , namely , Mr. Greaves , discussed in the judgment of the chief says it is murder , and that half - a - dozen justice , and Lord Coke's dictum is books affirm it to be murder ; and , explained to ...

A Treatise on the Law of Homicide in the United States


Seems Like Murder Here

He murders his white boss, enacting vengeance through dismemberment—half a head for a pair of testicles—in a way that equalizes ... The blues subject as lynching witness begets, by a process of condensation, the blues subject as abject- ...

Seems Like Murder Here

Winner of the 2004 C. Hugh Holman Award from the Society for the Study of Southern Literature. Seems Like Murder Here offers a revealing new account of the blues tradition. Far from mere laments about lost loves and hard times, the blues emerge in this provocative study as vital responses to spectacle lynchings and the violent realities of African American life in the Jim Crow South. With brilliant interpretations of both classic songs and literary works, from the autobiographies of W. C. Handy, David Honeyboy Edwards, and B. B. King to the poetry of Langston Hughes and the novels of Zora Neale Hurston, Seems Like Murder Here will transform our understanding of the blues and its enduring power.

Murder by Magic

Fran offered glasses of fizz to Ben and Libby. 'Just to start off with,' she said. 'We go on to the cheap stuff later!' With common consent the subject of the St Aldeberge murders was dropped and Jane asked after the panto.

Murder by Magic

'With fascinating characters and an intriguing plot, this is a real page turner' KATIE FFORDE praise for the series An addictive and unputdownable crime mystery novel perfect for fans of Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, Faith Martin, J.R. Ellis, LJ Ross, Miss Marple and Midsummer Murders! Lesley Cookman's bestselling series featuring amateur sleuth Libby Sarjeant is back for its tenth instalment! 'Whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.' Surely? Libby Sarjeant and her friend Fran Wolfe are asked to look into the sudden and unexplained death of a devoted churchgoer. The police appear to have lost interest, but the villagers are certain that their new lady vicar has something to do with it! But if it is murder, how on earth was it done? There doesn't seem to be any rational explanation... But could it really be magic? ______________________________________________________ Praise for the bestselling series: 'Another delightful Libby Sarjeant murder mystery... An entertaining read' ***** Amazon review 'As usual, another good light hearted murder mystery' ***** Amazon review 'Excellent book full of intrigue. Lovely descriptions of the areas. You get involved with the characters and feel you are friends with them' ***** Amazon review 'Red-herrings and a truly British flavour make this a good read... I am happy to recommend and will be reading more of books written by this author' ***** Amazon review

Making Murder Public

These chapters do not engage directly with the subject of 'self-murder'. While I have tried throughout to avoid imposing modern definitions of murder upon the past—not automatically excluding slayings of infants or by means of weapons ...

Making Murder Public

Homicide has a history. In early modern England, that history saw two especially notable developments: one, the emergence in the sixteenth century of a formal distinction between murder and manslaughter, made meaningful through a lighter punishment than death for the latter, and two, a significant reduction in the rates of homicides individuals perpetrated on each other. Making Murder Public explores connections between these two changes. It demonstrates the value in distinguishing between murder and manslaughter, or at least in seeing how that distinction came to matter in a period which also witnessed dramatic drops in the occurrence of homicidal violence. Focused on the 'politics of murder', Making Murder Public examines how homicide became more effectively criminalized between 1480 and 1680, with chapters devoted to coroners' inquests, appeals and private compensation, duels and private vengeance, and print and public punishment. The English had begun moving away from treating homicide as an offence subject to private settlements or vengeance long before other Europeans, at least from the twelfth century. What happened in the early modern period was, in some ways, a continuation of processes long underway, but intensified and refocused by developments from 1480 to 1680. Making Murder Public argues that homicide became fully 'public' in these years, with killings seen to violate a 'king's peace' that people increasingly conflated with or subordinated to the 'public peace' or 'public justice.'

The Lincoln Murder Conspiracies

On the subject of Lincoln's murder , the popularizers have had little written history to popularize . In 1937 the position left vacant for so many years by professional historians and biographers was occupied with a vengeance by Otto ...

The Lincoln Murder Conspiracies

Examines the many theories that have led to speculation that Lincoln's assassination was a conspiracy.

The Greatest Murder Mysteries of S S Van Dine 12 Titles in One Volume Illustrated Edition

He has become excited whenever we broached the subject of the murders, and has ridiculed the idea that they were connected. In fact, many of his actions have been highly suspicious. Also, we know he is abnormal and ...

The Greatest Murder Mysteries of S  S  Van Dine   12 Titles in One Volume  Illustrated Edition

Philo Vance is a stylish, even foppish dandy, a New York dilettante and bon vivant possessing a highly intellectual bent he likes to use for solving some quite complicated crimes. His methods are unusual and often in contradiction to the firm police rules and official requirements, but his wit always gets him a step further. Philo Vance novels were chronicled by his friend Van Dine, who appears as a kind of Dr. Watson figure in the books. Table of Contents: Introduction Twenty Rules for Writing Detective Stories The Philo Vance Series The Benson Murder Case The Canary Murder Case The Greene Murder Case The Bishop Murder Case The Scarab Murder Case The Kennel Murder Case The Dragon Murder Case The Casino Murder Case The Garden Murder Case The Kidnap Murder Case The Gracie Allen Murder Case The Winter Murder Case S. S. Van Dine is the pseudonym used by American art critic Willard Huntington Wright when he wrote detective novels. He was an important figure in avant-garde cultural circles in pre-WWI New York, and under the pseudonym he created the immensely popular fictional detective Philo Vance.

Murder and Its Consequences

It is no longer even necessary to change the names of the principals of the crime, which catches the fancy of the public before it becomes the subject of a television movie. Murder, in other words, sells soap and beer and cars and ...

Murder and Its Consequences

The essays in Murder and Its Consequences span several periods in the history of capital punishment in America and the professional career of Leigh Bienen, a leading researcher on the death penalty. “A Good Murder” describes the subtle relationship between high-profile murders and the death penalty, while “The Proportionality Review of Capital Cases” places the well-known study of proportionality in New Jersey within a nationwide context. “Anomalies” suggests that the arcane protocols written for lethal injection have little to do with insuring humane executions, but rather are concerned with protecting the sensibilities of witnesses and the liability of corrections officials. Other essays address the groundbreaking developments surrounding the death penalty in Illinois, and take a retrospective look at the evolution of her own and the country’s thinking about this complex, divisive topic.

Jewish Ritual Murder A Historical Investigation

And now, in order to exonerate Judaism per se from the suspicion of ritual murder, the so-called “expert opinion” of the ... “which refer to the subject (of ritual murder) and contain hints which, despite all the precautions of editing, ...

Jewish Ritual Murder    A Historical Investigation