The Sufficiency Of a Standing Revelation in General, And of the Scripture Revelation in Particular. Both As to the Matter of It, and As to the Proof of It; And That New Revelations Cannot Reasonably be Desired, and Would Probably be Unsuccesful

In Eight Sermons, Preach'd in the Cathedral-Church of St. Paul, London; At the Lecture Founded by the Honourable Robert Boyle, Esq; in the Year 1700

The Sufficiency Of a Standing Revelation in General, And of the Scripture Revelation in Particular. Both As to the Matter of It, and As to the Proof of It; And That New Revelations Cannot Reasonably be Desired, and Would Probably be Unsuccesful


Confidence and Character

The Religious Life of George Washington

Confidence and Character

His birthday was once celebrated as a national holiday and his portrait once adorned the walls of almost every classroom in the United States. He was a victorious Revolutionary War general, a crucial influence in the creation of the Constitution, and the first President of the United States. Today, unfortunately, many only know America's first hero and the "Father of His Country" as a slaveholder with wooden teeth or as the somber-looking man on the one-dollar bill. To many, he remains a distant, mysterious, and unapproachable figure from a day long gone. The truth about George Washington, however, is much different. He was America's most successful, venerated, and indispensable founding father. So who was this man? What made him such a singularly successful leader? What lessons can be learned from his life? Confidence and Character: The Religious Life of George Washington examines religion's impact on the private and public man. Too often ignored, underemphasized, suppressed, or distorted, Washington's religious faith fundamentally inspired and nurtured his worldview, vocational performance, and leadership. This is the Washington we need to get to know and learn from, even today.

"In the Hands of a Good Providence"

Religion in the Life of George Washington

Attempts by evangelical Christians to claim Washington and other founders as their own, and scholars' ongoing attempts to contradict these claims, are nothing new. Particularly after Washington was no longer around to refute them, legends of his Baptist baptism or secret conversion to Catholicism began to proliferate. Mount Vernon researcher Mary Thompson endeavors to get beyond the current preoccupation with whether Washington and other founders were or were not evangelical Christians to ask what place religion had in their lives. Thompson follows Washington and his family over several generations, situating her inquiry in the context of new work on the place of religion in colonial and postrevolutionary Virginia and the Chesapeake. Thompson considers Washington's active participation as a vestryman and church warden as well as a generous donor to his parish prior to the Revolution, and how his attendance declined after the war. He would attend special ceremonies, and stood as godparent to the children of family and friends, but he stopped taking communion and resigned his church office. Something had changed, but was it Washington, the church, or both? Thompson concludes that he was a devout Anglican, of a Latitudinarian bent, rather than either an evangelical Christian or a Deist. The meaning of this description, Thompson allows, when applied to eighteenth-century Virginia gentlemen, is far from self-evident, leaving ample room for speculation.