The Taste of Place

While much has been written about the concept of terroir as it relates to wine, this book expands the concept into cuisine and culture more broadly.

The Taste of Place

While much has been written about the concept of terroir as it relates to wine, this book expands the concept into cuisine and culture more broadly. Bringing together stories of people farming, cooking and eating, the author focuses on a series of examples ranging from shagbark hicory nuts in Wisconsin to wines from northern California.

The Taste of Place

A STRONG AGRARIAN TRADITION, THE SYMBOLIC importance of the peasant, and nationalist pride in all things culinary ... Such an emphasis on practice, place, and taste was embraced at all levels of French society, from the individual ...

The Taste of Place

How and why do we think about food, taste it, and cook it? While much has been written about the concept of terroir as it relates to wine, in this vibrant, personal book, Amy Trubek, a pioneering voice in the new culinary revolution, expands the concept of terroir beyond wine and into cuisine and culture more broadly. Bringing together lively stories of people farming, cooking, and eating, she focuses on a series of examples ranging from shagbark hickory nuts in Wisconsin and maple syrup in Vermont to wines from northern California. She explains how the complex concepts of terroir and goût de terroir are instrumental to France's food and wine culture and then explores the multifaceted connections between taste and place in both cuisine and agriculture in the United States. How can we reclaim the taste of place, and what can it mean for us in a country where, on average, any food has traveled at least fifteen hundred miles from farm to table? Written for anyone interested in food, this book shows how the taste of place matters now, and how it can mediate between our local desires and our global reality to define and challenge American food practices.

The Taste of American Place

communicated by food alliances can accurately reflect the popular conception of these places, as they did in this study for California, Vermont, and Texas. That marketers would use a place association to sell an item tells something ...

The Taste of American Place

Tracing the intertwined roles of food, ethnicity, and regionalism in the construction of American identity, this textbook examines the central role food plays in our lives. Drawing on a range of disciplines_including sociology, anthropology, folklore, geography, history, and nutrition_the editors have selected a group of engaging essays to help students explore the idea of food as a window into American culture. The editors' general introductory essay offers an overview of current scholarship, and part introductions contextualize the readings within each section. This lively reader will be a valuable supplement for courses on American culture across the social sciences.

Divided Spirits

However, as anthropologist Amy Trubek explains in The Taste of Place: A Cultural Journey into Terroir, it was ultimately France's food culture, more than the natural environment, that created the goût (or taste) of terroir.

Divided Spirits

Divided Spirits tells the stories of tequila and mezcal, two of Mexico’s most iconic products. In doing so, the book illustrates how neoliberalism influences the production, branding, and regulation of local foods and drinks. It also challenges the strategy of relying on “alternative” markets to protect food cultures and rural livelihoods. In recent years, as consumers increasingly demand to connect with the people and places that produce their food, the concept of terroir—the taste of place—has become more and more prominent. Tequila and mezcal are both protected by denominations of origin (DOs), legal designations that aim to guarantee a product’s authenticity based on its link to terroir. Advocates argue that the DOs expand market opportunities, protect cultural heritage, and ensure the reputation of Mexico’s national spirits. Yet this book shows how the institutions that are supposed to guard “the legacy of all Mexicans” often fail those who are most in need of protection: the small producers, agave farmers, and other workers who have been making tequila and mezcal for generations. The consequences—for the quality and taste of tequila and mezcal, and for communities throughout Mexico—are stark. Divided Spirits suggests that we must move beyond market-based models if we want to safeguard local products and the people who make them. Instead, we need systems of production, consumption, and oversight that are more democratic, more inclusive, and more participatory. Lasting change is unlikely without the involvement of the state and a sustained commitment to addressing inequality and supporting rural development.

Meanings of Maple

Trubek, The Taste of Place, 208. 81. Johnston and Baumann, Foodies, 85. 82. Interview with a sugarmaker, 27 May 2010. 83. Wilson, “Selling Culture,” 155–56, italics in original. 84. Davenport and Staats, “Maple Syrup Production for the ...

Meanings of Maple

In Meanings of Maple, Michael A. Lange provides a cultural analysis of maple syrup making, known in Vermont as sugaring, to illustrate how maple syrup as both process and product is an aspect of cultural identity. Readers will go deep into a Vermont sugar bush and its web of plastic tubes, mainline valves, and collection tanks. They will visit sugarhouses crammed with gas evaporators and reverse-osmosis machines. And they will witness encounters between sugar makers and the tourists eager to invest Vermont with mythological fantasies of rural simplicity. So much more than a commodity study, Meanings of Maple frames a new approach for evaluating the broader implications of iconic foodways, and it will animate conversations in food studies for years to come.

The Food Lover s Guide to Wine

It is a really simple label, the wines are cheap [around $10], and they are fantastic. ... Associating wine with the place and its food—“the taste of place,” as we call it—makes it much easier to remember all the different wines.

The Food Lover s Guide to Wine

A wine book unlike any other,The Food Lover's Guide to Wine offers a fresh perspective via the single aspect of wine most compelling to food lovers: flavor. At the heart of this indispensable reference, formatted like the authors' two previous bestsellers The Flavor Bible and What to Drink with What You Eat, is an encyclopedic A-to-Z guide profiling hundreds of different wines by their essential characteristics-from body and intensity to distinguishing flavors, from suggested serving temperatures and ideal food pairings to recommended producers (including many iconic examples). The book provides illuminating insights from dozens of America's best sommeliers via informative sidebars, charts and boxes, which complement the book's gorgeous four-color photography. Another groundbreaking work from two of the ultimate culinary insiders, this instant classic is the perfect gift book.

Italians and Food

In C. Korsmeyer (Ed.), The Taste Culture Reader: Experiencing Food and Drink (pp. 260–272). Oxford and New York: Berg. Trubek, A. B. (2008). The Taste of Place: A Cultural Journey into Terroir. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Italians and Food

This book is a novel and original collection of essays on Italians and food. Food culture is central both to the way Italians perceive their national identity and to the consolidation of Italianicity in global context. More broadly, being so heavily symbolically charged, Italian foodways are an excellent vantage point from which to explore consumption and identity in the context of the commodity chain, and the global/local dialectic. The contributions from distinguished experts cover a range of topics including food and consumer practices in Italy, cultural intermediators and foodstuff narratives, traditions of production and regional variation in Italian foodways, and representation of Italianicity through food in old and new media. Although rooted in sociology, Italians and Food draws on literature from history, anthropology, semiotics and media studies, and will be of great interest to students and scholars of food studies, consumer culture, cultural sociology, and contemporary Italian studies.

Animal Models for the Study of Human Disease

In a combined CPP–CTA study, Reicher and Holman41 presented data demonstrating that the same injection of amphetamine could condition a taste aversion while conditioning a place preference to the environment in which the saccharin was ...

Animal Models for the Study of Human Disease

Preclinical animal research has contributed greatly to our understanding of numerous human disease states and will continue to provide a method for investigating the various biochemical events, physiological processes, and behavioral implications of various diseases. For substance abuse and dependence, this research has enabled scientists to gain a greater understanding of the neurochemical events involved in the brain's response to drugs, both licit and illicit, and to provide a means by which to design and test novel pharmaco-therapeutic interventions. To enable these discoveries, scientists have developed numerous animal models that attempt to replicate human drug addiction. The current review explores two popular Pavlovian conditioning procedures, conditioned place preference and conditioned taste aversion, which are used to investigate the rewarding and aversive effects (respectively) of drugs of abuse. For each procedure, a brief history of the field is followed by the advantages of the procedures and a step-by-step explanation of each procedure's conditioning protocol.

Gustatory Tourism

Gustatory Tourism


A Taste of Paris

The handsome brick-and-stone pavilions of Place des Vosges were his papa's pet project. Given the young king's lack of taste and his disdain for delicacy, a cynic might say it's fitting that the Square Louis XIII, the fountain-dotted ...

A Taste of Paris

In his trademark witty and informative style, David Downie embarks on a quest to discover “What is it about the history of Paris that has made it a food lover’s paradise?” Long before Marie Antoinette said, “Let them eat cake!” (actually, it was brioche), the Romans of Paris devoured foie gras, and live oysters rushed in from the Atlantic; one Medieval cookbook describes a thirty-two part meal featuring hare stew, eel soup, and honeyed wine; during the last great banquet at Versailles a year before the Revolution the gourmand Louis XVI savored thirty-two main dishes and sixteen desserts; yet, in 1812, Grimod de la Reynière, the father of French gastronomy, regaled guests with fifty-two courses, fifteen wines, three types of coffee, and seventeen liqueurs. Following the contours of history and the geography of the city, Downie sweeps readers on an insider’s gourmet walking tour of Paris and its environs in A Taste of Paris, revealing the locations of Roman butcher shops, classic Belle Epoque bistros serving diners today and Marie Antoinette’s exquisite vegetable garden that still supplies produce, no longer to the unfortunate queen, but to the legendary Alain Ducasse and his stylish restaurant inside the palace of Versailles. Along the way, readers learn why the rich culinary heritage of France still makes Paris the ultimate arbiter in the world of food.

Living with Coyotes

The taste of familiar foods, as one might hope, becomes aversive only after many pairings with illness. The familiarity of the place in which the food is eaten is also a factor in the conditioning of food aversions.

Living with Coyotes

The coyote may well be North America's most adaptable large predator. While humans have depleted or eliminated most other native predators, the coyote has defied all attempts to exterminate it, simultaneously expanding its range from coast to coast and from wilderness to urban areas. As a result, coyotes are becoming the focus of increasing controversy and emotion for people across the continent— from livestock growers who would like to eradicate coyotes to conservationists who would protect them at any cost. In this thoughtful, well-argued, and timely book, Stuart Ellins makes the case that lethal methods of coyote management do not work and that people need to adopt a more humane way of coexisting with coyotes. Interweaving scientific data about coyote behavior and natural history with decades of field experience, he shows how endlessly adaptive coyotes are and how attempts to kill them off have only strengthened the species through natural selection. He then explains the process of taste aversion conditioning—which he has successfully employed—to stop coyotes from killing domestic livestock and pets. Writing frankly as an advocate of this effective and humane method of controlling coyotes, he asks, "Why are we mired in the use of archaic, inefficient, unsophisticated, and barbaric methods of wildlife management in this age of reason and high technology? This question must be addressed while there is still a wildlife to manage."

The Taste of Metal

That sudden separation from all the things I knew and loved, the growing sense of powerful but unfocused guilt, the absurd ... true north on the compass will always be here, for me, in this dry place out on the big toe of Nebraska.

The Taste of Metal


Devouring Japan

They frequently admitted that they could not explain the difference in taste, but stated that they nevertheless found ... The teas varied in quality and place of origin, but the tea deemed the most refined (and expensive) was a gyokuro ...

Devouring Japan

In recent years Japan's cuisine, or washoku, has been eclipsing that of France as the world's most desirable food. UNESCO recognized washoku as an intangible cultural treasure in 2013 and Tokyo boasts more Michelin-starred restaurants than Paris and New York combined. International enthusiasm for Japanese food is not limited to haute cuisine; it also encompasses comfort foods like ramen, which has reached cult status in the U.S. and many world capitals. Together with anime, pop music, fashion, and cute goods, cuisine is part of the "Cool Japan" brand that promotes the country as a new kind of cultural superpower. This collection of essays offers original insights into many different aspects of Japanese culinary history and practice, from the evolution and characteristics of particular foodstuffs to their representation in literature and film, to the role of foods in individual, regional, and national identity. It features contributions by both noted Japan specialists and experts in food history. The authors collectively pose the question "what is washoku?" What culinary values are imposed or implied by this term? Which elements of Japanese cuisine are most visible in the global gourmet landscape and why? Essays from a variety of disciplinary perspectives interrogate how foodways have come to represent aspects of a "unique" Japanese identity and are infused with official and unofficial ideologies. They reveal how Japanese culinary values and choices, past and present, reflect beliefs about gender, class, and race; how they are represented in mass media; and how they are interpreted by state and non-state actors, at home and abroad. They examine the thoughts, actions, and motives of those who produce, consume, promote, and represent Japanese foods.

Mobilizing Hospitality

Place is momentarily sensed in the combination of mobilities of objects, fashions and tastes, interacting with performances of ... of place and provides the taste experiences desired by people on the move and taste communities in place.

Mobilizing Hospitality

The concept of ’mobility’ has sparked lively academic debate in recent years. Drawing on research from the fields of anthropology, geography, sociology and tourism studies, this volume examines the intersection between mobility and hospitality, highlighting the issues that emerge as we encounter strangers in a mobile world. Through a series of diverse empirical accounts, it focuses on the transnational movement of people in the contexts of migration and tourism and examines how hospitality serves as a way of promoting and policing encounters, questioning how these relations are marked by exclusion as well as inclusion, and by violence as well as by kindness. In addition to exploring the power relations between mobile populations (hosts and guests) and attitudes (hospitality and hostility), the book also examines spaces of hospitality and mobility, such as cities, hotels, clubs, cafes, spas, asylums, restaurants, homes and homepages. In doing so, it makes a significant contribution to the political and ethical dimensions of mobile social relations.

Mitigating Conflicts in Coastal Areas through Science Dissemination

In other words, it is an instance of the relationship between food, its production, the place of production and the culture of the place's inhabitants, which is summed up in the definition 'Geography of Taste' (Montanari, Costa, ...

Mitigating Conflicts in Coastal Areas through Science Dissemination

This volume is part of a series of publications on cross-national comparative research in the fields of global climate change, coastal areas, sustainable urban development and human mobility. These factors, are confronted with conflicts of interest which arise at both the local and the global level. The volumes being published in this series attempt to provide a contribution to resolving these conflicts. This multi-national and multi-disciplinary network was set up in 2009 on the occasion of the European Commission’s call for proposals for a Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) project. Part One of this volume deals with the knowledge and topics addressed by those involved in knowledge dissemination, and considers the changes that have taken place during the past few decades, thanks to the introduction of ICT tools, which have also influenced the ability and readiness of public opinion to intervene in matters that are pre-eminently scientific. Part Two considers the potential of the new technologies and the limits they can impose on scientific dissemination. Parts Three and Four focus on how scientific dissemination was tested and evaluated by the SECOA’s stakeholders, who in this case were also the end users. Part Three recounts the experience of working with a middle school in Civitavecchia and a high school in Ostia. Part Four of this book deals with the activities of SECOA’s end users and the outcomes of a meeting held in India as part of a SECOA session.

Introduction to Biopsychology

THE SENSE OF TASTE (GUSTATION) Humans evolved as omnivores, enabling them to eat a variety of food of both plant and animal ... It is here, within the microvilli, that transduction of taste information into neural input takes place ...

Introduction to Biopsychology

Explores both the foundations and the history of biological psychology, including stories behind important discoveries in the field. Includes over 250 colour diagrams, the latest research and MCQs to provide psychology students with everything they need to know.

Basics of Medical Physiology

The taste sensations from the anterior two-third of the tongue are carried by chorda tympani, a branch of the facial nerve. It is carried by the ... An extreme degree of adaptation takes place for taste sensation. It occurs at the level ...

Basics of Medical Physiology

About the Book This book explains the basic concepts of medical physiology in a clear and concise style. The fourth edition presents revised and updated text with numerous new diagrams. The Applied Physiology aspect has been suitably emphasized.

Pittsburgh Chef s Table

Extraordinary Recipes from the Steel City Sarah Sudar, Julia Gongaware, Amanda Mcfadden, Laura Zorch ... cut into 1-inch dice 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons salt, plus more to taste 11/2 tablespoons whole black peppercorns ...

Pittsburgh Chef s Table

Pittsburgh was once a beleaguered steel town, but has transformed into a place that people are talking about—in only the best ways possible. The cuisine here is also evolving. Pittsburgh restaurant legends have laid a solid culinary foundation, encouraging a continuous stream of newbies to take risks applauded by stomachs everywhere! Creativity and sustainability are on the rise, but most importantly, the Pittsburgh food scene has remained unpretentious and relatable. The variety available runs the gamut of cuisine, flavor, and price, allowing both novice and expert foodies to experience culinary bliss. With recipes for the home cook from over 50 of the city's most celebrated eateries and showcasing over 200 full-color photos featuring mouth-watering dishes, famous chefs, and lots of local flavor, Pittsburgh Chef's Table is the ultimate gift and keepsake cookbook for both tourists and locals alike.

Blood Cross

He may be driven by something that happened yesterday, a century ago, or two thousand years ago. ... Now I mentally nudged Beast awake and let my senses loose to absorb the place through its smells, the taste of its air, the springiness ...

Blood Cross

View our feature on Faith Hunter’s Blood Cross. Jane Yellowrock is back on the prowl against the children of the night... The vampire council has hired skinwalker Jane Yellowrock to hunt and kill one of their own who has broken sacred ancient rules-but Jane quickly realizes that in a community that is thousands of years old, loyalties run deep...

A Taste of Life

'I'm ready to be killed,' says U.G. in a matter-of-fact tone. It's lunchtime. This place is being run by some very efficient people. Whoever wants to pitch in drops whatever money he or she wants to in a small bottle.

A Taste of Life

U.G. Krishnamurti famously described enlightenment as a neurobiological state of being with no religious, psychological or mystical implications. He did not lecture, did not set up organizations, held no gatherings and professed to have no message for mankind. Known as the ‘anti-guru’, the ‘raging sage’ and the ‘thinker who shuns thought’, U.G. spent his life destroying accepted beliefs in science, god, mind, soul, religion, love and relationships—all the props man uses to live life. Having taken away all support systems from those who came to him, he refused to replace them with those of his own; always insisting that each must find his own truth. And when U.G. knew that it was time for him go, he refused all attempts to prolong life with medical help. He let nature, and his body, take their course. On the afternoon of 22 March 2007, U.G. Krishnamurti passed away in Vallecrosia, Italy.