The Tennis Court Oath

A Book of Poems John Ashbery. THE TENNIS COURT OATH This page intentionally left blank THE TENNIS COURT OATH /

The Tennis Court Oath

John Ashbery writes like no one else among contemporary American poets. In the construction of his intricate patterns, he uses words much as the contemporary painter uses form and color- words painstakingly chosen as conveyors of precise meaning, not as representations of sound. These linked in unexpected juxtapositions, at first glance unrelated and even anarchic, in the end create by their clashing interplay a structure of dazzling brilliance and strong emotional impact. From this preoccupation arises a poetry that passes beyond conventional limits into a highly individual realm of effectiveness, one that may be roughly likened to the visual world of Surrealist painting. Some will find Mr. Ashbery’s work difficult, even forbidding; but those who are sensitive to new directions in ideas and the arts will discover here much to quicken and delight them. A 35th anniversary edition of classic work from a celebrated American poet who has received the Pulitzer Prize, the national Book Award, and the national Book Critics Circle Award. John Ashbery’s second book, The Tennis Court Oaths, first published by Wesleyan in 1962, remains a touchstone of contemporary avant-garde poetry.

The Tennis Court Oath

The Tennis Court Oath: The History and Legacy of the National Assembly's Pivotal Meeting at the Beginning of the French Revolution analyzes the history and legacy of one of the French Revolution's seminal events.

The Tennis Court Oath

*Includes pictures *Includes a bibliography for further reading As one of the seminal social revolutions in human history, the French Revolution holds a unique legacy, especially in the West. The early years of the Revolution were fueled by Enlightenment ideals, seeking the social overthrow of the caste system that gave the royalty and aristocracy decisive advantages over the lower classes. But history remembers the French Revolution in a starkly different way, as the same leaders who sought a more democratic system while out of power devolved into establishing an incredibly repressive tyranny of their own once they acquired it. The French Revolution was a turbulent period that lasted several years, and one of the most famous events of the entire revolution came near the beginning with the Tennis Court Oath. By July of 1788, King Louis XVI agreed to call the Estates-General, a large, traditional legislative body, for the first time since 1614. The country's finances, already quite tenuous, reached a crisis stage in August 1788 as France faced bankruptcy. In March 1789, the electoral method was set. While the nobility and clergy would hold direct elections, the much larger Third Estate would elect representatives from each district who would then attend larger assemblies to elect their official representatives to the Third Estate of the Estates-General. Finally, in the spring of 1789, Louis XVI summoned the Estates-General. They were to convene at Versailles on April 27, but did not do so until May 5. Late elections continued into the summer as conditions around the country delayed many elections. At the same time, bread prices reached an all-time high, leading to riots throughout the country, particularly in Paris. During the formal ritual that welcomed the Estates-General on May 4, 1789, in a precursor of things to come in the following months, the Third Estate refused to kneel before the king. The deputies of the Third Estate came before the king, walking two at a time, and bowed before Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. Not surprisingly, those witnessing the parade of the Estates-General had hoped for reform but came to expect that the Estates-General would serve as a tool of the administration. Unaware of why the National Assembly was closed off, and faced with the loss of their usual meeting place, the National Assembly laid claim to an unused indoor tennis court at Versailles for their meetings, which continued throughout the weekend of June 20, 1789. The king's actions were viewed as an act of despotism, renewing the spirit of the Assembly. Together, all of the deputies of the National Assembly, took an oath, commonly referred to as the Tennis Court Oath, in which they vowed to remain in session until "the constitution of the Realm and public regeneration are established and assured." On June 22, the Royal Session was postponed and the Assembly met again in the tennis court. They welcomed the clergy to the National Assembly, as decided on June 19. With some joy, they also greeted three noblemen from the Estates-General who had chosen to join the National Assembly. The stage was set for a confrontation between the king and the National Assembly, and within a month, the Bastille would be stormed, leading to widespread riots. The French Revolution had begun in earnest. The Tennis Court Oath: The History and Legacy of the National Assembly's Pivotal Meeting at the Beginning of the French Revolution analyzes the history and legacy of one of the French Revolution's seminal events. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Tennis Court Oath like never before.

Peripheral Visions

The background of assembled workers and the deployment of the central male figures refer visually to Jacques Louis David's 1791 The Tennis Court Oath . The drawing depicts three clergymen embracing before a crowd of impassioned French ...

Peripheral Visions

An insightful overview of an important era in cinema.

Visual Culture

The Theater of Revolution: A New Interpretation of Jacques-Louis David's Tennis Court Oath S artistes manquées, as would-be artists, we art historians feel a strong inclination toward the great unfinished projects.

Visual Culture

“We can no longer see, much less teach, transhistorical truths, timeless works of art, and unchanging critical criteria without a highly developed sense of irony about the grand narratives of the past,” declare the editors, who also coedited Visual Theory: Painting and Interpretation (1990). The field of art history is not unique in finding itself challenged and enlarged by cultural debates over issues of class, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender. Visual Culture assembles some of the foremost scholars of cultural studies and art history to explore new critical approaches to a history of representation seen as something different from a history of art. CONTRIBUTORS: Andres Ross, Michael Ann Holly, Mieke Bal, David Summers, Constance Penley, Kaja Silverman, Ernst Van Alphen, Norman Bryson, Wolfgang Kemp, Whitney Davis, Thomas Crow, Keith Moxey, John Tagg, Lisa Tickner. Ebook Edition Note: Ebook edition note: all illustrations have been redacted.

Jacques Louis David and Jean Louis Prieur Revolutionary Artists

Of the two representations of the Tennis Court Oath , Prieur's and David's , it is Prieur's that portrays the actual event most accurately , and the language used by the artist , narrative and descriptive , is appropriate to that ...

Jacques Louis David and Jean Louis Prieur  Revolutionary Artists

A comparative study of the French Revolution's most famous artist and a little-known illustrator.

John Ashbery and American Poetry

The first poems Ashhery wrote while in Paris , the poems he published in 1962 in his controversial volume The Tennis Court Oath , were remarkably different not only from the poems he published in Some Trees but , as it has turned out ...

John Ashbery and American Poetry

David Herd discusses the poetry of John Ashbery, showing that a sense of occasion was a binding principle for the poets of the New York School. He traces the development of Ashbery's poetry and sets it against culturally defining issues.

Visualizing the Revolution

Salon of 1791 , where a preliminary sketch of The Tennis Court Oath was exhibited , there were few other pictures of contemporary events . The Tennis Court Oath commemorates the central political event of the beginning of the Revolution ...

Visualizing the Revolution

The authors explore the complex, many-faceted visual culture of the French Revolution, which took place in a period characterised by the creation of a new visual language steeped in metaphor, symbol and allegory.

France in Revolution 1776 1830

His proposal for the Tennis Court Oath was partly to prevent Sieyes ' more radical suggestion that the deputies should take themselves to Paris . He played an important part in drawing up the Declaration of Rights but he remained pro ...

France in Revolution  1776 1830

Containing sample exam questions at both AS and A2 levels, this text aims to show students what makes a good answer and why it scores high marks. It should help students grasp the difference between a GCSE and an A-level mark in history.

Poetry and the Sense of Panic

This is the Ashbery of the 1962 volume The Tennis Court Oath , notable in Helen Vendler's view for its " wilful flashiness and sentimentality ” . Of course , it helps if Bloom and Vendler are so negative about these poems - as Geoff ...

Poetry and the Sense of Panic

For all the disciplined artifice of Elizabeth Bishop and John Ashbery, the essays in this collection show that panic plays a crucial role in their work, giving substance to Bishop's claim that “an element of mortal panic and fear” underlines all art. Panic emerges as a condition of creative anxiety and the self-imposed demands of originality in response to the poetic traditions Bishop and Ashbery inherited. These concerns are explored in essays addressed to Bishop and Ashbery's engagement with European Surrealism as an alternative to the dominant poetics of Modernism and its aftermath in the middle years of the twentieth century. Other essays debate the philosophical, religious, and political orientation of their work in relation to Romantic orthodoxies and Postmodern ironies in terms of cultural history, ideology and poetic practice. This collection provides original commentaries on the work of two poets widely regarded as amongst the most significant American poets of the second half of the twentieth century with essays by notable scholars from the United States and Britain known for their special interests in modern poetry including Joanne Feit Diehl, Mark Ford, Edward Larissy, Peter Nicholls, Peter Robinson, Thomas Travisano, Cheryl Walker and Geoff Ward.

The French Revolution and Napoleon

2 REVOLUTIONARY ACTION The Tennis Court Oath , 20 June 1789 The immediate issue at Versailles was that of voting procedures : should the Estates - General meet in three separate chambers or in a common assembly ?

The French Revolution and Napoleon

The French Revolutionary and Napoleonic period was the defining moment for modern European history. Using primary texts, this volume explains the upheavals, terror, and drama that restructured politics and society on such a large scale.

The French Revolution

It is impossible in these brief pages to follow the vicissitudes of that entire series of constitutions drafted , adopted , suspended , implemented , and subverted in France during the decade separating the Tennis Court Oath from the ...

The French Revolution

Collating key texts at the forefront of new research and interpretation, this updated second edition adds new articles on the Terror and race/colonial issues, and studies all aspects of this major event, from its origins through to its consequences.

Social Science Term 1

The angry members assembled on June 20, 1789, in the hall of an indoor Tennis Court in the grounds of Versailles. Here, they took the 'Tennis Court Oath' "never to separate....until the constitution of the kingdom shall be established.

Social Science Term 1

A book on social science

The Paradoxes of Nationalism

On June 20, 1789, the members of the National Assembly swore the famous “Tennis Court Oath” (so named because they had to gather in an indoor tennis court after having been barred, either deliberately or through miscommunication, ...

The Paradoxes of Nationalism

An interdisciplinary study of nationalism drawing on the events of the French Revolution.

Portraiture and Politics in Revolutionary France

figure 29 Jacques-Louis David, The Tennis Court Oath, 1791. Pen and wash with brown ink, heightened with white gouache on paper, 66 × 101 cm. Châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon, Versailles. ofindividuals also allows for a multitude of ...

Portraiture and Politics in Revolutionary France

Portraiture and Politics in Revolutionary France challenges widely held assumptions about both the genre of portraiture and the political and cultural role of images in France at the beginning of the nineteenth century. After 1789, portraiture came to dominate French visual culture because it addressed the central challenge of the Revolution: how to turn subjects into citizens. Revolutionary portraits allowed sitters and artists to appropriate the means of representation, both aesthetic and political, and articulate new forms of selfhood and citizenship, often in astonishingly creative ways. The triumph of revolutionary portraiture also marks a turning point in the history of art, when seriousness of purpose and aesthetic ambition passed from the formulation of historical narratives to the depiction of contemporary individuals. This shift had major consequences for the course of modern art production and its engagement with the political and the contingent.

A Brief History of the Masses

In the summer of 1793 , he had interrupted work on The Tennis Court Oath . The shock- ing assassination of Marat reignited his calling as the chronicler of the revolution , and he set out to eternalize the popular leader .

A Brief History of the Masses

Stefan Jonsson uses three monumental works of art to build a provocative history of popular revolt: Jacques-Louis David's The Tennis Court Oath (1791), James Ensor's Christ's Entry into Brussels in 1889 (1888), and Alfredo Jaar's They Loved It So Much, the Revolution (1989). Addressing, respectively, the French Revolution of 1789, Belgium's proletarian messianism in the 1880s, and the worldwide rebellions and revolutions of 1968, these canonical images not only depict an alternative view of history but offer a new understanding of the relationship between art and politics and the revolutionary nature of true democracy. Drawing on examples from literature, politics, philosophy, and other works of art, Jonsson carefully constructs his portrait, revealing surprising parallels between the political representation of "the people" in government and their aesthetic representation in painting. Both essentially "frame" the people, Jonsson argues, defining them as elites or masses, responsible citizens or angry mobs. Yet in the aesthetic fantasies of David, Ensor, and Jaar, Jonsson finds a different understanding of democracy-one in which human collectives break the frame and enter the picture. Connecting the achievements and failures of past revolutions to current political issues, Jonsson then situates our present moment in a long historical drama of popular unrest, making his book both a cultural history and a contemporary discussion about the fate of democracy in our globalized world.

Necklines

Laying bare the structure of David's composition , the preparatory sketch for the Tennis Court Oath , which is now at the Fogg Art Museum in Cambridge , Massachusetts , is particularly illuminating , for it reveals the structure of the ...

Necklines

This book examines the crucial period in the painter's career as he struggled to save his neck and recast his identity in the aftermath of the Reign of Terror. Burcharth assesses his works in the context of the larger cultural and social formations emerging in France concluding with an interpretation of the unfinished portrait of Juliette Recamier.

The Global West Connections Identities Volume 2 Since 1550

The Tennis Court Oath This painting of the Tennis Court Oath, based on an unfinished painting of Jacques-Louis David, enshrines the moment in French collective memory. Here, representatives of the revolutionary nation stretch out their ...

The Global West  Connections   Identities  Volume 2  Since 1550

Intimidated by the thought of taking Western civ? You may be in for a pleasant surprise because THE GLOBAL WEST isn't a typical Western civ textbook. Developed by authors who've spent years helping a diverse range of students understand history, the book uses stories of ordinary people and their impact on history, along with stunning images and maps that make the subject interesting. You'll also have lots of help learning concepts with learning objectives, an easy-reading narrative and a clear message that helps you get the origins of today's interconnected world. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Sensing the Nation s Law

At the Salon of 1791, David would exhibit his sketch of the Tennis Court Oath right below that of the Oath of the Horatii,44 his earlier and famously “sculpturesque” work.45 This positioning is telling. The Oath of the Horatii signaled ...

Sensing the Nation s Law

This book examines how the nation – and its (fundamental) law – are ‘sensed’ by way of various aesthetic forms from the age of revolution up until our age of contested democratic legitimacy. Contemporary democratic legitimacy is tied, among other things, to consent, to representation, to the identity of ruler and ruled, and, of course, to legality and the legal forms through which democracy is structured. This book expands the ways in which we can understand and appreciate democratic legitimacy. If (democratic) communities are “imagined” this book suggests that their “rightfulness” must be “sensed” – analogously to the need for justice not only to be done, but to be seen to be done. This book brings together legal, historical and philosophical perspectives on the representation and iconography of the nation in the European, North American and Australian contexts from contributors in law, political science, history, art history and philosophy.

Museums and the Public Sphere

The Tennis Court Oath, 20th June 1798 Davids work often engaged directly with public matters, and was known to incite public discussion (Crow, 1985; Eisenman, 1994). There are many examples of visual discourse of the public sphere in ...

Museums and the Public Sphere

Museums and the Public Sphere investigates the role of museums around the world as sites of democratic public space. Explores the role of museums around the world as sites of public discourse and democracy Examines the changing idea of the museum in relation to other public sites and spaces, including community cultural centers, public halls and the internet Offers a sophisticated portrait of the public, and how it is realized, invoked, and understood in the museum context Offers relevant case studies and discussions of how museums can engage with their publics' in more complex, productive ways

Writing the Materialities of the Past

If the occasion of the Tennis Court Oath had not occurred then something very much like it, liberating deputies to gather as a National Assembly without royal sanction, would have been required for the revolutionary events to unfold ...

Writing the Materialities of the Past

Writing the Materialities of the Past offers a close analysis of how the materiality of the built environment has been repressed in historical thinking since the 1950s. Author Sam Griffiths argues that the social theory of cities in this period was characterised by the dominance of socio-economic and linguistic-cultural models, which served to impede our understanding of time-space relationality towards historical events and their narration. The book engages with studies of historical writing to discuss materiality in the built environment as a form of literary practice to express marginalised dimensions of social experience in a range of historical contexts. It then moves on to reflect on England’s nineteenth-century industrialization from an architectural topographical perspective, challenging theories of space and architecture to examine the complex role of industrial cities in mediating social changes in the practice of everyday life. By demonstrating how the authenticity of historical accounts rests on materially emplaced narratives, Griffiths makes the case for the emancipatory possibilities of historical writing. He calls for a re-evaluation of historical epistemology as a primarily socio-scientific or literary enquiry and instead proposes a specifically architectural time-space figuration of historical events to rethink and refresh the relationship of the urban past to its present and future. Written for postgraduate students, researchers and academics in architectural theory and urban studies, Griffiths draws on the space syntax tradition of research to explore how contingencies of movement and encounter construct the historical imagination.