The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited

Robert H. MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson's The Theory of Island Biogeography, first published by Princeton in 1967, is one of the most influential books on ecology and evolution to appear in the past half century.

The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited

Robert H. MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson's The Theory of Island Biogeography, first published by Princeton in 1967, is one of the most influential books on ecology and evolution to appear in the past half century. By developing a general mathematical theory to explain a crucial ecological problem--the regulation of species diversity in island populations--the book transformed the science of biogeography and ecology as a whole. In The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited, some of today's most prominent biologists assess the continuing impact of MacArthur and Wilson's book four decades after its publication. Following an opening chapter in which Wilson reflects on island biogeography in the 1960s, fifteen chapters evaluate and demonstrate how the field has extended and confirmed--as well as challenged and modified--MacArthur and Wilson's original ideas. Providing a broad picture of the fundamental ways in which the science of island biogeography has been shaped by MacArthur and Wilson's landmark work, The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited also points the way toward exciting future research.

The Theory of Island Biogeography

Population theory. "MacArthur and Wilson's is arguably the most influential book in biogeography in the last hundred years.

The Theory of Island Biogeography

Population theory.

Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology

Evolutionary. Theories. in. Biogeography,. Patterns. in. References. Arnott, S., 2009. Lakes, as islands. In: Gillespie, R.G., Clague, D.A. (Eds.), ... In: Losos, J.B., Ricklefs, R.E. (Eds.), The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited.

Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology

Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology is the definitive go-to reference in the field of evolutionary biology. It provides a fully comprehensive review of the field in an easy to search structure. Under the collective leadership of fifteen distinguished section editors, it is comprised of articles written by leading experts in the field, providing a full review of the current status of each topic. The articles are up-to-date and fully illustrated with in-text references that allow readers to easily access primary literature. While all entries are authoritative and valuable to those with advanced understanding of evolutionary biology, they are also intended to be accessible to both advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Broad topics include the history of evolutionary biology, population genetics, quantitative genetics; speciation, life history evolution, evolution of sex and mating systems, evolutionary biogeography, evolutionary developmental biology, molecular and genome evolution, coevolution, phylogenetic methods, microbial evolution, diversification of plants and fungi, diversification of animals, and applied evolution. Presents fully comprehensive content, allowing easy access to fundamental information and links to primary research Contains concise articles by leading experts in the field that ensures current coverage of each topic Provides ancillary learning tools like tables, illustrations, and multimedia features to assist with the comprehension process

Encyclopedia of the World s Biomes

The theories of island biogeography and metapopulation dynamics: Science marches forward, but the legacy of good ideas lasts for a long time. In: Losos, J.B., Ricklefs, R.E. (Eds.), The theory of island biogeography revisited.

Encyclopedia of the World   s Biomes

Encyclopedia of the World’s Biomes is a unique, five volume reference that provides a global synthesis of biomes, including the latest science. All of the book's chapters follow a common thematic order that spans biodiversity importance, principal anthropogenic stressors and trends, changing climatic conditions, and conservation strategies for maintaining biomes in an increasingly human-dominated world. This work is a one-stop shop that gives users access to up-to-date, informative articles that go deeper in content than any currently available publication. Offers students and researchers a one-stop shop for information currently only available in scattered or non-technical sources Authored and edited by top scientists in the field Concisely written to guide the reader though the topic Includes meaningful illustrations and suggests further reading for those needing more specific information

The Theory of Ecology

Island biogeography theory: reticulations and reintegration of “a biogeography of the species,” Pages 13–51 in J. B. Losos and R. E. Ricklefs, eds. The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited. Princeton, Princeton University Press.

The Theory of Ecology

Despite claims to the contrary, the science of ecology has a long history of building theories. Many ecological theories are mathematical, computational, or statistical, though, and rarely have attempts been made to organize or extrapolate these models into broader theories. The Theory of Ecology brings together some of the most respected and creative theoretical ecologists of this era to advance a comprehensive, conceptual articulation of ecological theories. The contributors cover a wide range of topics, from ecological niche theory to population dynamic theory to island biogeography theory. Collectively, the chapters ably demonstrate how theory in ecology accounts for observations about the natural world and how models provide predictive understandings. It organizes these models into constitutive domains that highlight the strengths and weaknesses of ecological understanding. This book is a milestone in ecological theory and is certain to motivate future empirical and theoretical work in one of the most exciting and active domains of the life sciences.

Molecular Panbiogeography of the Tropics

A general dynamic theory of island biogeography: Extending the MacArthur-Wilson theory to accommodate the rise and fall of volcanic islands. In J.B. Losos and R.E. Ricklefs (eds.), The theory of island biogeography revisited (pp.

Molecular Panbiogeography of the Tropics

"An engaging attempt to simultaneously retain the best of several traditionally different approaches in historical biogeography, incorporating concepts and data from each into a new perspective on Croizat's vision of Earth and life evolving together."--Brett R. Riddle, University of Nevada, Las Vegas"A fascinating story, well-told and engaging, about a world now receding into the distance." Robert Calder, University of Saskatchewan

The International Encyclopedia of Geography

“Island Biogeography of Remote Archipelagos: Interplay between Ecological and Evolutionary Processes.” In The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited, edited by J.B. Losos and R.E. Ricklefs, 358–387. Princeton: Princeton University ...

The International Encyclopedia of Geography


The Theory of Evolution

Coexistence of the niche and neutral perspectives in community ecology. Ecology 87:1399–1410. ... Pp. 415–38 in J. B. Losos and R. E. Ricklefs, eds., The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited. Princeton University Press, Princeton, ...

The Theory of Evolution

Darwin’s nineteenth-century writings laid the foundations for modern studies of evolution, and theoretical developments in the mid-twentieth century fostered the Modern Synthesis. Since that time, a great deal of new biological knowledge has been generated, including details of the genetic code, lateral gene transfer, and developmental constraints. Our improved understanding of these and many other phenomena have been working their way into evolutionary theory, changing it and improving its correspondence with evolution in nature. And while the study of evolution is thriving both as a basic science to understand the world and in its applications in agriculture, medicine, and public health, the broad scope of evolution—operating across genes, whole organisms, clades, and ecosystems—presents a significant challenge for researchers seeking to integrate abundant new data and content into a general theory of evolution. This book gives us that framework and synthesis for the twenty-first century. The Theory of Evolution presents a series of chapters by experts seeking this integration by addressing the current state of affairs across numerous fields within evolutionary biology, ranging from biogeography to multilevel selection, speciation, and macroevolutionary theory. By presenting current syntheses of evolution’s theoretical foundations and their growth in light of new datasets and analyses, this collection will enhance future research and understanding.

Introduction to Population Ecology

The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ. Ricklefs, R.E. and J. Lovette. 1999. The role of island area per se and habitat diversity in species-area relationships of four Lesser Antilliean ...

Introduction to Population Ecology

Introduction to Population Ecology, 2nd Edition is a comprehensive textbook covering all aspects of population ecology. It uses a wide variety of field and laboratory examples, botanical to zoological, from the tropics to the tundra, to illustrate the fundamental laws of population ecology. Controversies in population ecology are brought fully up to date in this edition, with many brand new and revised examples and data. Each chapter provides an overview of how population theory has developed, followed by descriptions of laboratory and field studies that have been inspired by the theory. Topics explored include single–species population growth and self–limitation, life histories, metapopulations and a wide range of interspecific interactions including competition, mutualism, parasite–host, predator–prey and plant–herbivore. An additional final chapter, new for the second edition, considers multi–trophic and other complex interactions among species. Throughout the book, the mathematics involved is explained with a step–by–step approach, and graphs and other visual aids are used to present a clear illustration of how the models work. Such features make this an accessible introduction to population ecology; essential reading for undergraduate and graduate students taking courses in population ecology, applied ecology, conservation ecology, and conservation biology, including those with little mathematical experience.

Encyclopedia of the Anthropocene

The theory of island biogeography revisited, pp. 53–85. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press. Simberloff D and Wilson EO (1970) Experimental zoogeography of islands. A two-year record of colonization. Ecology 51: 934–937.

Encyclopedia of the Anthropocene

Encyclopedia of the Anthropocene presents a currency-based, global synthesis cataloguing the impact of humanity’s global ecological footprint. Covering a multitude of aspects related to Climate Change, Biodiversity, Contaminants, Geological, Energy and Ethics, leading scientists provide foundational essays that enable researchers to define and scrutinize information, ideas, relationships, meanings and ideas within the Anthropocene concept. Questions widely debated among scientists, humanists, conservationists, politicians and others are included, providing discussion on when the Anthropocene began, what to call it, whether it should be considered an official geological epoch, whether it can be contained in time, and how it will affect future generations. Although the idea that humanity has driven the planet into a new geological epoch has been around since the dawn of the 20th century, the term ‘Anthropocene’ was only first used by ecologist Eugene Stoermer in the 1980s, and hence popularized in its current meaning by atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen in 2000. Presents comprehensive and systematic coverage of topics related to the Anthropocene, with a focus on the Geosciences and Environmental science Includes point-counterpoint articles debating key aspects of the Anthropocene, giving users an even-handed navigation of this complex area Provides historic, seminal papers and essays from leading scientists and philosophers who demonstrate changes in the Anthropocene concept over time

Conservation Biogeography

The theory of island biogeography revisited (ed. by J.B. Losos and R.E. Ricklefs), pp. 88–115. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ. Wikramanayake, E.D., Dinerstein, E., Loucks, C., Olson, D., Morrison, J., Lamoreux, J., McKnight, ...

Conservation Biogeography

The Earth’s ecosystems are in the midst of an unprecedentedperiod of change as a result of human action. Many habitats havebeen completely destroyed or divided into tiny fragments, othershave been transformed through the introduction of new species, orthe extinction of native plants and animals, while anthropogenicclimate change now threatens to completely redraw the geographicmap of life on this planet. The urgent need to understand andprescribe solutions to this complicated and interlinked set ofpressing conservation issues has lead to the transformation of thevenerable academic discipline of biogeography – the study ofthe geographic distribution of animals and plants. The newlyemerged sub-discipline of conservation biogeography uses theconceptual tools and methods of biogeography to address real worldconservation problems and to provide predictions about the fate ofkey species and ecosystems over the next century. This bookprovides the first comprehensive review of the field in a series ofclosely interlinked chapters addressing the central issues withinthis exciting and important subject. View ahref="http://www.wiley.com/go/ladle/biogeography"www.wiley.com/go/ladle/biogeography/a yoaccess the figures from the book.

Biogeography

Global patterns of plant invasions and the concept of invasibility. Ecology, 80(5), 1522–1536. ... Characteristics of invaded islands, with special reference to Hawai'i. ... The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited.

Biogeography

The recent progress in analytical methods, aided by bringing in a wide range of other disciplines, opens up the study to a broader field, which means that biogeography now goes far beyond a simple description of the distribution of living species on Earth. Originating with Alexander von Humboldt, biogeography is a discipline in which ecologists and evolutionists aim to understand the way that living species are organized in connection with their environments. Today, as we face major challenges such as global warming, massive species extinction and devastating pandemics, biogeography offers hypotheses and explanations that may help to provide solutions. This book presents as wide an overview as possible of the different fields that biogeography interacts with. Sixteen authors from all over the world offer different approaches based on their specific areas of knowledge and experience; thus, we intend to illustrate the vast number of diverse aspects covered by biogeography.

The SAGE Handbook of Biogeography

On the relationship between alpha, beta and gamma diversity', Ecology Letters, 3: 73–76. Losos, J.B. and R.E. Ricklefs, eds. (2009) The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited. Princeton NJ, Princeton University Press.

The SAGE Handbook of Biogeography

"A superb resource for understanding the diversity of the modern discipline of biogeography, and its history and future, especially within geography departments. I expect to refer to it often." - Professor Sally Horn, University of Tennessee "As you browse through this fine book you will be struck by the diverse topics that biogeographers investigate and the many research methods they use.... Biogeography is interdisciplinary, and a commonly-voiced concern is that one biogeographer may not readily understand another's research findings. A handbook like this is important for synthesising, situating, explaining and evaluating a large literature, and pointing the reader to informative publications." - Geographical Research "A valuable contribution in both a research and teaching context. If you are biologically trained, it provides an extensive look into the geographical tradition of biogeography, covering some topics that may be less familiar to those with an evolution/ecology background. Alternatively, if you are a geography student, researcher, or lecturer, it will provide a useful reference and will be invaluable to the non-biogeographer who suddenly has the teaching of an introductory biogeography course thrust upon them." - Adam C. Algar, Frontiers of Biogeography The SAGE Handbook of Biogeography is a manual for scoping the past, present and future of biogeography that enable readers to consider, where relevant, how similar biogeographical issues are tackled by researchers in different 'schools'. In line with the concept of all SAGE Handbooks, this is a retrospective and prospective overview of biogeography that will: Consider the main areas of biogeography researched by geographers Detail a global perspective by incorporating the work of different schools of biogeographers Ecplore the divergent evolution of biogeography as a discipline and consider how this diversity can be harnessed Examine the interdisciplinary debates that biogeographers are contributing to within geography and the biological sciences. Aimed at an international audience of research students, academics, researchers and practitioners in biogeography, the text will attract interest from environmental scientists, ecologists, biologists and geographers alike.

The Silwood Circle

A History of Ecology and the Making of Scientific Careers in Late Twentieth-Century Britain Hannah Gay, World Scientific (Firm). Lehrer, Jonah, 2012. ... The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited. Princeton University Press.

The Silwood Circle

This is an original and wide-ranging account of the careers of a close-knit group of highly influential ecologists working in Britain from the late 1960s onwards. The book can also be read as a history of some recent developments in ecology. One of the group, Robert May, is a past president of the Royal Society, and the author of what many see as the most important treatise in theoretical ecology of the later twentieth century. That the group flourished was due not only to May's intellectual leadership, but also to the guiding hand of T. R. E. Southwood. Southwood ended his career as Linacre Professor of Zoology at the University of Oxford, where he also served a term as Vice-Chancellor. Earlier, as a professor and director of the Silwood Park campus of Imperial College London, he brought the group together. Since it began to coalesce at Silwood it has been named here the Silwood Circle. Southwood promoted the interests of its members with the larger aim of raising the profile of ecological and environmental science in Britain. Given public anxiety over the environment and the loss of ecosystems, his actions were well-timed.Ecology, which had been on the scientific margins in the first half of the twentieth century, came to be viewed as a science central to modern existence. The book illustrates its importance to many areas. Members of the Silwood Circle have acted as government advisors in the areas of conservation and biodiversity, resource management, pest control, food policy, genetically modified crops, sustainable agriculture, international development, defence against biological weapons, and epidemiology and infectious disease control. In recounting the science they carried out, and how they made their careers, the book reflects also on the role of the group, and the nature of scientific success.

Encyclopedia of Environmental Change

Island biogeography continues to play an important role in providing insights for evolutionary biologists, ecologists and biogeographers, in general. ... Losos JB and Ricklefs RE (2009) The theory of island biogeography revisited.

Encyclopedia of Environmental Change

Accessibly written by a team of international authors, the Encyclopedia of Environmental Change provides a gateway to the complex facts, concepts, techniques, methodology and philosophy of environmental change. This three-volume set illustrates and examines topics within this dynamic and rapidly changing interdisciplinary field. The encyclopedia includes all of the following aspects of environmental change: Diverse evidence of environmental change, including climate change and changes on land and in the oceans Underlying natural and anthropogenic causes and mechanisms Wide-ranging local, regional and global impacts from the polar regions to the tropics Responses of geo-ecosystems and human-environmental systems in the face of past, present and future environmental change Approaches, methodologies and techniques used for reconstructing, dating, monitoring, modelling, projecting and predicting change Social, economic and political dimensions of environmental issues, environmental conservation and management and environmental policy Over 4,000 entries explore the following key themes and more: Conservation Demographic change Environmental management Environmental policy Environmental security Food security Glaciation Green Revolution Human impact on environment Industrialization Landuse change Military impacts on environment Mining and mining impacts Nuclear energy Pollution Renewable resources Solar energy Sustainability Tourism Trade Water resources Water security Wildlife conservation The comprehensive coverage of terminology includes layers of entries ranging from one-line definitions to short essays, making this an invaluable companion for any student of physical geography, environmental geography or environmental sciences.

Biogeography

A general dynamic theory of oceanic island biogeography: extending the MacArthur–Wilson theory to accommodate the rise and fall of volcanic islands. In: Losos JB, Ricklefs RE (eds.), The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited.

Biogeography

Through eight successful editions, and over nearly 40 years, Biogeography: An Ecological and Evolutionary Approach has provided a thorough and comprehensive exploration of the varied scientific disciplines and research that are essential to understanding the subject. The text has been praised for its solid background in historical biogeography and basic biology, that is enhanced and illuminated by discussions of current research. This new edition incorporates the exciting changes of the recent years, and presents a thoughtful exploration of the research and controversies that have transformed our understanding of the biogeography of the world. It also clearly identifies the three quite different arenas of biogeographical research: continental biogeography, island biogeography and marine biogeography. It is the only current textbook with full coverage of marine biogeography. It reveals how the patterns of life that we see today have been created by the two great Engines of the Planet - the Geological Engine, plate tectonics, which alters the conditions of life on the planet, and the Biological Engine, evolution, which responds to these changes by creating new forms and patterns of life.

Natural Systems

Conservation of oceanic island floras: present and future global challenges. Perspectives in Plant Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics ... In J. B. Losos and R. E. Ricklefs, editors, The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited ...

Natural Systems

Organised into four sections, this text discusses the organisation of the living world. Links Ecology, Biodiversity and Biogeography Bridges modern and conventional Ecology Builds sequentially from the concept and importance of species, through patterns of diversity to help consider global patterns of biogeography Uses real data sets to help train in essential skills

Plants of Oceanic Islands

A general dynamic theory of oceanic island biogeography: extending the MacArthur-Wilson theory to accommodate the rise and fall of volcanic islands. In J. B. Losos and R. E. Ricklefs (eds.), The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited ...

Plants of Oceanic Islands

Bringing together results from over 30 years of research on the Juan Fernández Archipelago off the coast of Chile, this book offers comprehensive coverage of the plants of these special islands. Despite its remote setting in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, the Juan Fernández Archipelago is in many ways an ideal place to ask and attempt to answer basic questions regarding the evolution of vascular plants in an oceanic island environment. By building upon a firm taxonomic base for the flora, a new level of understanding regarding evolution, biogeography, and conservation of the plants is presented. This book is an extensive investigation of the origin and evolution of the flora of an oceanic archipelago, and it serves as a valuable resource for researchers and scholars of island biology as well as for conservation biologists worldwide.

Island Life

Biogeography. 3rd ed. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Press. Losos, J. B., and R. E. Ricklefs, eds. 2010. The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Lundberg, J. G., J. P. Sullivan, ...

Island Life

Alfred Russel Wallace is best known as the codiscoverer, with Charles Darwin, of natural selection, but he was also history’s foremost tropical naturalist and the father of biogeography, the modern study of the geographical basis of biological diversity. Island Life has long been considered one of his most important works. In it he extends studies on the influence of the glacial epochs on organismal distribution patterns and the characteristics of island biogeography, a topic as vibrant and actively studied today as it was in 1880. The book includes history’s first theory of continental glaciation based on a combination of geographical and astronomical causes, a discussion of island classification, and a survey of worldwide island faunas and floras. The year 2013 will mark the centennial of Wallace’s death and will see a host of symposia and reflections on Wallace’s contributions to evolution and natural history. This reissue of the first edition of Island Life, with a foreword by David Quammen and an extensive commentary by Lawrence R. Heaney, who has spent over three decades studying island biogeography in Southeast Asia, makes this essential and foundational reference available and accessible once again.

The Species Area Relationship

Theory and Application Thomas J. Matthews, Kostas A. Triantis, Robert J. Whittaker ... island biogeography. Journal of Biogeography, 36, 1100–1110. ... Losos, J. B. & Ricklefs, R. E. (2010) The theory of island biogeography revisited.

The Species Area Relationship

The species-area relationship (SAR) describes a range of related phenomena that are fundamental to the study of biogeography, macroecology and community ecology. While the subject of ongoing debate for a century, surprisingly, no previous book has focused specifically on the SAR. This volume addresses this shortfall by providing a synthesis of the development of SAR typologies and theory, as well as empirical research and application to biodiversity conservation problems. It also includes a compilation of recent advances in SAR research, comprising novel SAR-related theories and findings from the leading authors in the field. The chapters feature specific knowledge relating to terrestrial, marine and freshwater realms, ensuring a comprehensive volume relevant to a wide range of fields, with a mix of review and novel material and with clear recommendations for further research and application.