The Time Traveller s Guide to Restoration Britain

The past is a foreign country: this is your guidebook.

The Time Traveller s Guide to Restoration Britain

The past is a foreign country: this is your guidebook. If you could travel back in time, the period from 1660 to 1700 would make one of the most exciting destinations in history. It is the age of Samuel Pepys and the Great Fire of London; bawdy comedy and the libertine court of Charles II — the civil wars are over and a magnificent new era has begun. But what would it really be like to live in Restoration Britain? Where would you stay and what would you eat? How much should you pay for one of those elaborate wigs? Should you trust a physician who advises you to drink fresh cow’s urine to cure your gout? Why are boys made to smoke in school? And why are you unlikely to get a fair trial in court? The third volume in the series of Ian Mortimer’s bestselling Time Traveller’s Guides answers these crucial questions and encourages us to reflect on the customs and practices of daily life. This unique guide not only teaches us about the seventeenth century but makes us look with fresh eyes at the modern world.

The Time Traveler s Guide to Restoration Britain

What would you wear? Where might you be suspected of witchcraft? Where would you be welcome? This is an up-close-and-personal look at Britain between the Restoration of King Charles II in 1660 and the end of the century.

The Time Traveler s Guide to Restoration Britain

Imagine you could see the smiles of the people mentioned in Samuel Pepys’s diary, hear the shouts of market traders, and touch their wares. How would you find your way around? Where would you stay? What would you wear? Where might you be suspected of witchcraft? Where would you be welcome? This is an up-close-and-personal look at Britain between the Restoration of King Charles II in 1660 and the end of the century. The last witch is sentenced to death just two years before Isaac Newton’s Principia Mathematica, the bedrock of modern science, is published. Religion still has a severe grip on society and yet some—including the king—flout every moral convention they can find. There are great fires in London and Edinburgh; the plague disappears; a global trading empire develops.Over these four dynamic decades, the last vestiges of medievalism are swept away and replaced by a tremendous cultural flowering. Why are half the people you meet under the age of twenty-one? What is considered rude? And why is dueling so popular? Mortimer delves into the nuances of daily life to paint a vibrant and detailed picture of society at the dawn of the modern world as only he can.

The Time Traveller s Guide to Medieval England

'Ian Mortimer is the most remarkable medieval historian of our time' The Times 'After The Canterbury Tales this has to be the most entertaining book ever written about the middle ages' Guardian

The Time Traveller s Guide to Medieval England

Discover an original, entertaining and illuminating guide to a completely different world: England in the Middle Ages. Imagine you could travel back to the fourteenth century. What would you see, and hear, and smell? Where would you stay? What are you going to eat? And how are you going to test to see if you are going down with the plague? In The Time Traveller's Guide Ian Mortimer's radical new approach turns our entire understanding of history upside down. History is not just something to be studied; it is also something to be lived, whether that's the life of a peasant or a lord. The result is perhaps the most astonishing history book you are ever likely to read; as revolutionary as it is informative, as entertaining as it is startling. 'Ian Mortimer is the most remarkable medieval historian of our time' The Times 'After The Canterbury Tales this has to be the most entertaining book ever written about the middle ages' Guardian

The Time Traveller s Guide to Regency Britain

This is history at its most exciting, physical, visceral - the past not as something to be studied but as lived experience. This is Ian Mortimer at the height of his time-travelling prowess.

The Time Traveller s Guide to Regency Britain

'Excellent... Mortimer's erudition is formidable' The Times A time of exuberance, thrills, frills and unchecked bad behaviour...Ian Mortimer turns to what is arguably the most-loved period in British history - the Regency, or Georgian England. This is the age of Jane Austen and the Romantic poets; the paintings of John Constable and the gardens of Humphry Repton; Britain's military triumphs at Trafalgar and Waterloo. It was perhaps the last age of true freedom before the arrival of the stifling world of Victorian morality. And like all periods in history, it was an age of many contradictions - where Beethoven's thundering Fifth Symphony could premier in the same year that saw Jane Austen craft the delicate sensitivities of Persuasion. This is history at its most exciting, physical, visceral - the past not as something to be studied but as lived experience. This is Ian Mortimer at the height of his time-travelling prowess. 'Ian Mortimer has made this kind of imaginative time travel his speciality' Daily Mail

The Time Traveller s Guide to Restoration Britain

Travelling. Long-distance travel is one of the most important aspects of our whole cultural journey from the medieval world to the modern. It underpins our well-being in ... The roads in all parts of Britain leave a lot to be desired.

The Time Traveller s Guide to Restoration Britain

The past is a foreign country: this is your guidebook. If you could travel back in time, the period from 1660 to 1700 would make one of the most exciting destinations in history. It is the age of Samuel Pepys and the Great Fire of London; bawdy comedy and the libertine court of Charles II — the civil wars are over and a magnificent new era has begun. But what would it really be like to live in Restoration Britain? Where would you stay and what would you eat? How much should you pay for one of those elaborate wigs? Should you trust a physician who advises you to drink fresh cow’s urine to cure your gout? Why are boys made to smoke in school? And why are you unlikely to get a fair trial in court? The third volume in the series of Ian Mortimer’s bestselling Time Traveller’s Guides answers these crucial questions and encourages us to reflect on the customs and practices of daily life. This unique guide not only teaches us about the seventeenth century but makes us look with fresh eyes at the modern world.

The Time Traveller s Guide to Elizabethan England

In this book Ian Mortimer reveals a country in which life expectancy is in the early thirties, people still starve to death and Catholics are persecuted for their faith.

The Time Traveller s Guide to Elizabethan England

Machine generated contents note:1.The Landscape --2.The People --3.Religion --4.Character --5.Basic Essentials --6.What to Wear --7.Travelling --8.Where to Stay --9.What to Eat and Drink --10.Hygiene, Illness and Medicine --11.Law and Disorder --12.Entertainment.

The Time Traveler s Guide to Regency Britain

This is the age of Jane Austen and the Romantic poets; the paintings of John Constable and the gardens of Humphry Repton; the sartorial elegance of Beau Brummell and the poetic license of Lord Byron; Britain's military triumphs at Trafalgar ...

The Time Traveler s Guide to Regency Britain

A vivid and immersive history of Georgian England that gives its reader a firsthand experience of life as it was truly lived during the era of Jane Austen, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and the Duke of Wellington. This is the age of Jane Austen and the Romantic poets; the paintings of John Constable and the gardens of Humphry Repton; the sartorial elegance of Beau Brummell and the poetic license of Lord Byron; Britain's military triumphs at Trafalgar and Waterloo; the threat of revolution and the Peterloo massacre. In the latest volume of his celebrated series of Time Traveler's Guides, Ian Mortimer turns to what is arguably the most-loved period in British history: the Regency, or Georgian England. A time of exuberance, thrills, frills and unchecked bad behavior, it was perhaps the last age of true freedom before the arrival of the stifling world of Victorian morality. At the same time, it was a period of transition that reflected unprecedented social, economic, and political change. And like all periods in history, it was an age of many contradictions—where Beethoven's thundering Fifth Symphony could premier in the same year that saw Jane Austen craft the delicate sensitivities of Persuasion. Once more, Ian Mortimer takes us on a thrilling journey to the past, revealing what people ate, drank, and wore; where they shopped and how they amused themselves; what they believed in, and what they feared. Conveying the sights, sounds, and smells of the Regency period, this is history at its most exciting, physical, visceral—the past not as something to be studied but as lived experience.

The Time Traveler s Guide to Restoration England

The past is another country – this is your guidebook, from nationally bestselling author of The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England.

The Time Traveler s Guide to Restoration England

This is an up-close-and-personal look at Britain between the Restoration of King Charles II in 1660 and the end of the century. The last witch is sentenced to death just two years before Isaac Newton s Principia Mathematica, the bedrock of modern science, is published. Religion still has a severe grip on society and yet some including the king flout every moral convention they can find. There are great fires in London and Edinburgh; the plague disappears; a global trading empire develops Over these four dynamic decades, the last vestiges of medievalism are swept away and replaced by a tremendous cultural flowering. Why are half the people you meet under the age of twenty-one? What is considered rude? And why is dueling so popular? Mortimer delves into the nuances of daily life to paint a vibrant and detailed picture of society at the dawn of the modern world as only he can. "

Sweet and Clean

In The Time Travellers Guide to Restoration Britain (2017) Ian Mortimer notes that apart from one visit to Bath, Pepys does not immerse himself in water for the whole ten-year period of his diary.” The truth is that apart from the one ...

Sweet and Clean

Sweet and Clean? challenges the widely held beliefs on bathing and cleanliness in the past. For over thirty years, the work of the French historian, George Vigarello, has been hugely influential on early modern European social history, describing an aversion to water and bathing, and the use of linen underwear as the sole cleaning agent for the body. However, these concepts do not apply to early modern England. Sweet and Clean? analyses etiquette and medical literature, revealing repeated recommendations to wash or bathe in order to clean the skin. Clean linen was essential for propriety but advice from medical experts was contradictory. Many doctors were convinced that it prevented the spread of contagious diseases, but others recommended flannel for undergarments, and a few thought changing a fever patient's linens was dangerous. The methodology of material culture helps determine if and how this advice was practiced. Evidence from inventories, household accounts and manuals, and surviving linen garments tracks underwear through its life-cycle of production, making, wearing, laundering, and final recycling. Although the material culture of washing bodies is much sparser, other sources, such as the Old Bailey records, paint a more accurate picture of cleanliness in early modern England than has been previously described. The contrasting analyses of linen and bodies reveal what histories material culture best serves. Finally, what of the diseases-plague, smallpox, and typhus-that cleanliness of body and clothes were thought to prevent? Did following early modern medical advice protect people from these illnesses?

Charles II s Favourite Mistress

... John Long, London, 1937 Macqueen-Pope, Walter, Ladies First: The Story of Woman's Conquest of the British Stage, ... University of Kentucky Press, Kentucky, 1992 Mortimer, Ian, The Time Travellers Guide to Restoration Britain, ...

Charles II s Favourite Mistress

Nell Gwyn, the most infamous mistress of Charles II, was a commoner raised from the dingy back alleys of London to the stage and into a king’s arms. Hers was a true rags to riches story that saw a young girl rise from selling oranges to capturing the heart of a king. The Restoration period was one of change. After the troubled years of the English Civil War, it was time for pleasure, debauchery and entertainment with the ‘Merry Monarch’ restored to the throne. Nell was one of the first actresses on stage; a loveable comedienne who wowed audiences with her wit and charm. She fell in love with Charles Hart (one of the leading actors of the time), had a torrid affair with Lord Buckhurst and ultimately ended up in the king’s bed. She stayed on the stage for six years, but she stayed in the king’s heart for seventeen – his only mistress who was faithful to him. Set against the backdrop of Restoration London, this book charts Nell’s life and that of her family and friends – from her drunken mother and troublesome sister to the most notorious wits of the age John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester and George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham. Nell had a generous heart and a mischievous spirit, and was friends with people from all walks of life. The only woman she really detested was another of the king’s mistresses, Louise de Kerouaille, known as the French Spy. This highly entertaining book will tell the story of Nell’s life – the good and the bad – and show why Nell truly embodies the spirit of the Restoration.

Somerset A Troubled Century

A visit to a seventeenth-century dentist might not just be painful; it could occasionally be fatal.9 8 A Gambling Man, J.Uglow, p.329 Time Travellers' Guide to Restoration Britain, I. Mortimer, p.300 & 304 9 Work Those that did not find ...

Somerset  A Troubled Century

Rather than a chronology of events this volume looks at the lives, morals and beliefs of people and how they were affected by events that were largely out of their control. Rather than re hash the old stories about the main characters, there are portraits of the forgotten figures from that era, both heroes and villains. People like Peter Easton one of the most successful pirates of that or any other age, Lawrence Chislett, the unsung hero of the first siege of Taunton. John Sheppard, the renegade royalist who had to return to the small settlement of Kilton, in post-Civil war Somerset, and live among those whose lives he had made a misery Otherwise unremarkable people are featured, like Thomas Sesse, whose act of Christian charity spectacularly back fired on him. Then there was the mass hysteria at the “discovery of a Hellish knot of witches”, in Eat Somerset in the 1660's Eye witness accounts are used throughout from a wealth of original documents to try and recreate the sounds sights and experience of not only a county, and a country in a state of turmoil.

The Outcasts of Time

December 1348.

The Outcasts of Time

December 1348. What if you had just six days to save your soul? With the country in the grip of the Black Death, brothers John and William fear that they will shortly die and suffer in the afterlife. But as the end draws near, they are given an unexpected choice: either to go home and spend their last six days in their familiar world, or to search for salvation across the forthcoming centuries, living each one of their remaining days ninety-nine years after the last. John and William choose the future and find themselves in 1447, ignorant of almost everything going on around them. The year 1546 brings no more comfort, and 1645 challenges them in further unexpected ways. It is not just that technology is changing; things they have taken for granted all their lives prove to be short-lived. As they find themselves in stranger and stranger times, the reader travels with them, seeing the world through their eyes as it shifts through disease, progress, enlightenment, and war. But their time is running out—can they do something to redeem themselves before the six days are up?

Millennium

Here is a story of godly scientists, fearless adventurers, cold-hearted entrepreneurs, and strong-minded women — a story of discovery, invention, revolution, and cataclysmic shifts in perspective.

Millennium

In Millennium, bestselling historian Ian Mortimer takes the reader on a whirlwind tour of the last ten centuries of Western history. It is a journey into a past vividly brought to life and bursting with ideas, that pits one century against another in his quest to measure which century saw the greatest change.We journey from a time when there was a fair chance of your village being burned to the ground by invaders — and dried human dung was a recommended cure for cancer — to a world in which explorers sailed into the unknown and civilizations came into conflict with each other on an epic scale. Here is a story of godly scientists, fearless adventurers, cold-hearted entrepreneurs, and strong-minded women — a story of discovery, invention, revolution, and cataclysmic shifts in perspective. Millennium is a journey into the past like no other. Our understanding of human development will never be the same again, and the lessons we learn along the way are profound ones for us all.

The American Travellers Guides

Hand-books for Travellers in Europe and the East, Being a Guide Through Great Britain and Ireland, France, Belgium, ... one of the prettiest and bestvery interesting building , lately restored . built cities of the Rhenish provinces ...

The American Travellers  Guides


The American Traveller s Guide

Harper's Hand-book for Travellers in Europe and the East : Being a Guide Through Great Britain and Ireland, ... After the restoration of 1814 a few patrician families governed it for seventeen years , at the end of which time they were ...

The American Traveller s Guide


Millennium

Here is a story of godly scientists, fearless adventurers, cold-hearted entrepreneurs, and strong-minded women—a story of discovery, invention, revolution, and cataclysmic shifts in perspective.

Millennium

History’s greatest tour guide, Ian Mortimer, takes us on an eye-opening and expansive journey through the last millennium of human innovation. In Millennium, bestselling historian Ian Mortimer takes the reader on a whirlwind tour of the last ten centuries of Western history. It is a journey into a past vividly brought to life and bursting with ideas, that pits one century against another in his quest to measure which century saw the greatest change. We journey from a time when there was a fair chance of your village being burned to the ground by invaders—and dried human dung was a recommended cure for cancer—to a world in which explorers sailed into the unknown and civilizations came into conflict with each other on an epic scale. Here is a story of godly scientists, fearless adventurers, cold-hearted entrepreneurs, and strong-minded women—a story of discovery, invention, revolution, and cataclysmic shifts in perspective. Millennium is a journey into the past like no other. Our understanding of human development will never be the same again, and the lessons we learn along the way are profound ones for us all.

The Measurement of Association

Everitt, B.: Chance Rules: An Informal Guide to Probability, Risk, and Statistics, 2nd edn. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. ... 102, 606–613 (2008) Mortimer, I.: The Time Traveler's Guide to Restoration Britain. Pegasus, New York (2017) ...

The Measurement of Association

This research monograph utilizes exact and Monte Carlo permutation statistical methods to generate probability values and measures of effect size for a variety of measures of association. Association is broadly defined to include measures of correlation for two interval-level variables, measures of association for two nominal-level variables or two ordinal-level variables, and measures of agreement for two nominal-level or two ordinal-level variables. Additionally, measures of association for mixtures of the three levels of measurement are considered: nominal-ordinal, nominal-interval, and ordinal-interval measures. Numerous comparisons of permutation and classical statistical methods are presented. Unlike classical statistical methods, permutation statistical methods do not rely on theoretical distributions, avoid the usual assumptions of normality and homogeneity of variance, and depend only on the data at hand. This book takes a unique approach to explaining statistics by integrating a large variety of statistical methods, and establishing the rigor of a topic that to many may seem to be a nascent field. This topic is relatively new in that it took modern computing power to make permutation methods available to those working in mainstream research. Written for a statistically informed audience, it is particularly useful for teachers of statistics, practicing statisticians, applied statisticians, and quantitative graduate students in fields such as psychology, medical research, epidemiology, public health, and biology. It can also serve as a textbook in graduate courses in subjects like statistics, psychology, and biology.

The Travellers Guide Through Scotland and Its Islands etc

The fortifications raised in the time of Oliver Cromwell , in North Leith , called the Citadel , for the purpose of defending the harbour , were demolished at the restoration of Charles II . Of late , however , a very neat and ...

The Travellers Guide Through Scotland and Its Islands  etc


London Travellers Guide

restoration as well as of buying items associated with the castle . As one of Britain's major tourist attractions , the castle is filled to the brim with visitors in high summer ( lines of visitors waiting to see the state rooms and ...

London Travellers Guide