The Transformation Of Ireland 1900 2000

Politics and political parties are examined in detail but high politics does not dominate the book, which rather sets out to answer the question: 'What was it like to grow up and live in 20th-century Ireland'?

The Transformation Of Ireland 1900 2000

A ground-breaking history of the twentieth century in Ireland, written on the most ambitious scale by a brilliant young historian. It is significant that it begins in 1900 and ends in 2000 - most accounts have begun in 1912 or 1922 and largely ignored the end of the century. Politics and political parties are examined in detail but high politics does not dominate the book, which rather sets out to answer the question: 'What was it like to grow up and live in 20th-century Ireland'? It deals with the North in a comprehensive way, focusing on the social and cultural aspects, not just the obvious political and religious divisions.

Between Two Hells

THE IRISH BESTSELLER 'Ferriter has richly earned his reputation as one of Ireland's leading historians' Irish Independent 'Absorbing .

Between Two Hells

THE IRISH BESTSELLER 'Ferriter has richly earned his reputation as one of Ireland's leading historians' Irish Independent 'Absorbing ... A fascinating exploration of the Civil War and its impact on Ireland and Irish politics' Irish Times In June 1922, just seven months after Sinn Féin negotiators signed a compromise treaty with representatives of the British government to create the Irish Free State, Ireland collapsed into civil war. While the body count suggests it was far less devastating than other European civil wars, it had a harrowing impact on the country and cast a long shadow, socially, economically and politically, which included both public rows and recriminations and deep, often private traumas. Drawing on many previously unpublished sources and newly released archival material, one of Ireland's most renowned historians lays bare the course and impact of the war and how this tragedy shaped modern Ireland.

What If

What if Britain had blocked Irish immigration in the 1950s? What if there had been no 'Late Late Show'?

What If

History did not have to work out the way it actually did. Ferriter looks at twenty events in twentieth-century Irish life and wonders how they might have been different: What if Joyce and Beckett had stayed in Ireland? What if Britain had blocked Irish immigration in the 1950s? What if there had been no 'Late Late Show'?

A Nation and not a Rabble

Diarmaid Ferriter highlights the gulf between rhetoric and reality in politics and violence, the role of women, the battle for material survival, the impact of key Irish unionist and republican leaders, as well as conflicts over health, ...

A Nation and not a Rabble

Packed with violence, political drama and social and cultural upheaval, the years 1913-1923 saw the emergence in Ireland of the Ulster Volunteer Force to resist Irish home rule and in response, the Irish Volunteers, who would later evolve into the IRA. World War One, the rise of Sinn Fin, intense Ulster unionism and conflict with Britain culminated in the Irish war of Independence, which ended with a compromise Treaty with Britain and then the enmities and drama of the Irish Civil War. Drawing on an abundance of newly released archival material, witness statements and testimony from the ordinary Irish people who lived and fought through extraordinary times, A Nation and not a Rabble explores these revolutions. Diarmaid Ferriter highlights the gulf between rhetoric and reality in politics and violence, the role of women, the battle for material survival, the impact of key Irish unionist and republican leaders, as well as conflicts over health, land, religion, law and order, and welfare.

The Border

This is a past that most are happy to have left behind but might it also be the future? The border has been a topic of dispute for over a century, first in Dublin, Belfast and Westminster and, post Brexit referendum, in Brussels.

The Border

Shortlisted for the An Post Irish Book Awards Non-Fiction Book of the Year 2019 'Anyone who wishes to understand why Brexit is so intractable should read this book. I can think of several MPs who ought to.' The Times For the past two decades, you could cross the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic half a dozen times without noticing or, indeed, turning off the road you were travelling. It cuts through fields, winds back-and-forth across roads, and wends from Carlingford Lough to Lough Foyle. It is frictionless - a feat sealed by the Good Friday Agreement. Before that, watchtowers loomed over border communities, military checkpoints dotted the roads, and smugglers slipped between jurisdictions. This is a past that most are happy to have left behind but might it also be the future? The border has been a topic of dispute for over a century, first in Dublin, Belfast and Westminster and, post Brexit referendum, in Brussels. Yet, despite the passions of Nationalists and Unionists in the North, neither found deep wells of support in the countries they identified with politically. British political leaders were often ignorant of the conflict's complexities, rarely visited the border, and privately disliked their erstwhile unionist allies. Southern leaders' anti-partition statements masked relative indifference and unofficial cooperation with British security services. From the 1920 Government of Ireland Act that created the border, the Treaty and its aftermath, through the Civil Rights Movement, Thatcher, the Troubles and the Good Friday Agreement up to the Brexit negotiations, Ferriter reveals the political, economic, social and cultural consequences of the border in Ireland. With the fate of the border uncertain, The Border is a timely intervention by a renowned historian into one of the most contentious and misunderstood political issues of our time.

On the Edge

SHORTLISTED FOR THE ONSIDE NONFICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR 2018 The islands off the coast of Ireland have long been a source of fascination.

On the Edge

SHORTLISTED FOR THE ONSIDE NONFICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR 2018 The islands off the coast of Ireland have long been a source of fascination. Seen as repositories of an ancient Irish culture and the epitome of Irish romanticism, they have attracted generations of scholars, artists and filmmakers, from James Joyce to Robert O'Flaherty, looking for a way of life uncontaminated by modernity or materialism. But the reality for islanders has been a lot more complex. They faced poverty, hardship and official hostility, even while being expected to preserve an ancient culture and way of life. Writing in her 1936 autobiography, Peig Sayers, resident of Blaskets island, described it as 'this dreadful rock'. In 1841, there were 211 inhabited islands with a combined population of 38,000; by 2011, only 64 islands were inhabited, with a total population of 8,500. And younger generations continue to leave. By documenting the island experiences and the social, cultural and political reaction to them over the last 100 years, On the Edge examines why this exodus has happened, and the gulf between the rhetoric that elevated island life and the reality of the political hostility towards them.It uncovers, through state and private archives, personal memoirs, newspaper coverage, and the author's personal travels, the realities behind the "dreadful rocks", and the significance of the experiences of, and reactions to, those who were and remain, literally, on the very edge of European civilisation.

Familia 2004

DIARMAID FERRITER The Transformation of Ireland 19002000 Profile Books , London , 2004 ISBN 1 86197 307 1 pp . 704 £ 30.00 Recent histories , such as Alvin Jackson's Ireland 1798–1998 ( Oxford , 1998 ) and Jonathan Bardon's History of ...

Familia 2004

Familia, which was first published in 1985, aims to provide informed writing on sources and case studies relating to that area where Irish history and genealogy overlap with mutual benefit. Members of the Foundation's Guild receive Familia and the Directory of Irish Family History Research as part of the return on their annual subscription.

The Irish Revolutions 191323

Drawing on an abundance of newly released archival material, witness statements and testimony from the ordinary Irish people who lived and fought through extraordinary times, A Nation and not a Rabble explores these revolutions.

The Irish Revolutions 191323

Packed with violence, political drama and social and cultural upheaval, the years 1913-23 saw the emergence in Ireland of the Ulster Volunteer Force to resist Irish home rule and in response, the Irish Volunteers, who would later evolve into the IRA. World War One, the rise of Sinn Féin, intense Ulster unionism and conflict with Britain culminated in the Irish War of Independence, which ended with a compromise Treaty with Britain and then the enmities and drama of the Irish Civil War. Drawing on an abundance of newly released archival material, witness statements and testimony from the ordinary Irish people who lived and fought through extraordinary times, A Nation and not a Rabble explores these revolutions. Diarmaid Ferriter highlights the gulf between rhetoric and reality in politics and violence, the role of women, the battle for material survival, the impact of key Irish unionist and republican leaders, as well as conflicts over health, land, religion, law and order, and welfare.

What If Alternative Views of Twentieth Century Irish History

But the book also poses other, less obvious, questions: what if James Joyce and Samuel Beckett had stayed in Ireland; if Britain had blocked Irish immigration in the 1950s; if there had been no Late Late Show or Magill magazine; if Bishop ...

What If  Alternative Views of Twentieth Century Irish History

What If? is an entertaining, thoughtful, provocative and original look at some of the milestones of twentieth century Irish history that offers a glimpse of what might have been. We all know that there was nothing inevitable about much of modern Ireland’s history. Things could have turned out very differently, so it is natural to wonder what would have happened if certain events had never occurred or happened in a different way. What If? is the thought-provoking, enjoyable and insightful book that explores this conceit as its starting point, asking of key events in twentieth-century Ireland: ‘what if?’ Based on Diarmaid Ferriter’s acclaimed RTÉ Radio One series, the book looks at twenty events in twentieth-century Ireland, each of which was discussed on Ferriter’s show with two experts, and speculates on how things might have developed had circumstances been different. In doing so, Ferriter also sheds much new light on what actually did happen, how Ireland changed during the course of the twentieth century and the experiences of those who lived through it. The big questions are tackled: what if there had been no 1916 Rising? What if Ireland had been invaded during World War II? What if there had been no programmes for economic expansion? What if Mary Robinson had not been elected president in 1990? But the book also poses other, less obvious, questions: what if James Joyce and Samuel Beckett had stayed in Ireland; if Britain had blocked Irish immigration in the 1950s; if there had been no Late Late Show or Magill magazine; if Bishop Eamon Casey had never met Annie Murphy; or if John Charles McQuaid had never been Archbishop of Dublin? What If? Alternative Views of Twentieth-Century Ireland: Table of Contents Introduction What if there had been no Late Late Show? What if there had been no pro-life amendment referendum in 1983? What if there had been no Magill magazine? What if John Charles McQuaid had not been appointed Archbishop of Dublin in 1940? What if Ben Dunne had not gone on a golfing trip to Florida in 1992? What if Bishop Eamon Casey’s secret had not been discovered? What if there had been no 1916 Rising? What if the Treaty ports had not been returned in 1938? What if the Blueshirts had attempted a coup in 1933? What if de Valera had stood down as leader of Fianna Fáil in 1948 instead of 1959? What if Donogh O’Malley had not introduced free secondary education in 1967? What if the Irish Press had not closed down in 1995? What if James Joyce and Samuel Beckett had stayed in Ireland? What if Frank Duff had not established the Legion of Mary in 1921? What if the Jim Duffy tape had not been released during the 1990 presidential election? What if Proportional Representation had been abolished in 1959 or 1968? What if T. K. Whitaker had not been appointed Secretary of the Department of Finance in 1956? What if the members of U2 had gone to different schools in the 1970s? What if Britain had imposed restrictions on Irish immigration in the 1950s? What if Noël Browne had not been involved in Irish politics?

Ambiguous Republic

All those words apply to this important book based on recently opened archives and unique access to the papers of Jack Lynch and Liam Cosgrave.

Ambiguous Republic

Hard-nosed scholarship and moral passion underpin Diarmaid Ferriter's work. Now he turns to the key years of the 70s, when after half a century of independence, questions were being asked about the old ways of doing things. Ambiguous Republic considers the widespread social, cultural, economic and political upheavals of the decade, a decade when Ireland joined the EEC; when for the first time a majority of the population lived in urban areas; when economic challenges abounded; which saw too an increasingly visible feminist moment, and institutions including the Church began to be subjected to criticism.Diarmaid Ferriter's earlier books have been described as 'a landmark' and 'an immense contribution'; making 'brilliant use of new sources'; 'prodigiously gifted', and 'ground-breaking'. All those words apply to this important book based on recently opened archives and unique access to the papers of Jack Lynch and Liam Cosgrave.

Occasions of Sin

The breadth of this book and the richness of the source material uncovered make it definitive in its field and a most remarkable work of social history.

Occasions of Sin

Ferriter covers such subjects as abortion, pregnancy, celibacy, contraception, censorship, infanticide, homosexuality, prostitution, marriage, popular culture, social life and the various hidden Irelands associated with sexual abuse - all in the context of a conservative official morality backed by the Catholic Church and by legislation. The book energetically and originally engages with subjects omitted from the mainstream historical narrative. The breadth of this book and the richness of the source material uncovered make it definitive in its field and a most remarkable work of social history.

Ideas Interests and Institutions

Explaining Irish Social Security Policy Mary Murphy ... in Giddens, A. (ed), The Global Third Way Debate, Oxford: Polity Press, pp 115–133 Ferriter, D. (2004a), The Transformation of Ireland 1900-2000, London: Profile Books Ferriter, ...

Ideas  Interests and Institutions


Violence in Europe

Great Britain and Ireland since 1500: Integration and Diversity (pp. 200-214). ... The transformation of Ireland, 1900 - 2000. ... The vanishing Irish: Households, migration and the rural economy in Ireland, 1850 - 1914.

Violence in Europe


CCEA A2 level History Student Guide Partition of Ireland 1900 25

Ferriter, D. (2004) The Transformation of Ireland, 19002000, Profile. Fitzpatrick, D. (1996) The Two Irelands, 1912–1939, OUP.* Fleming, N. (2005) The Marquess of Londonderry: Aristocracy, Power and Politics in Britain and Ireland, ...

CCEA A2 level History Student Guide  Partition of Ireland  1900 25

Build, reinforce and assess students' knowledge throughout their course; tailored to the 2016 CCEA specification and brought to you by the leading History publisher, this study and revision guide combines clear content coverage with practice questions and sample answers. - Ensure understanding of the period with concise coverage of all Unit content, broken down into manageable chunks - Develop the analytical and evaluative skills that students need to succeed in A-level History - Consolidate understanding with exam tips and knowledge-check questions - Practise exam-style questions matched to the CCEA assessment requirements for every question type, including source-based examples - Improve students' exam technique and show them how to reach the next grade with sample student answers and commentary for each exam-style question - Use flexibly in class or at home, for knowledge acquisition during the course or focused revision and exam preparation

Hegemony and Fantasy in Irish Drama 1899 1949

Luke Gibbons, Transformations in Irish Culture (Cork: Cork University Press, 1996) p. 85. Christopher Murray, Twentieth Century Irish ... Diarmaid Ferriter, The Transformation of Ireland 19002000, p. 378. M.J. Molloy, Old Road, p. 24.

Hegemony and Fantasy in Irish Drama  1899 1949

Hegemony and Fantasy in Irish Drama, 1899-1949 offers a theoretically innovative reconsideration of drama produced in the Irish Renaissance, as well as an engagement with non-canonical drama in the under-researched period 1926-1949.

The Nation State in Transformation

Fanning, R. Kennedy, M. Keogh, D. & O'Halpin, E. (2002) Documents on Irish Foreign Policy Volume III 1926-1932, Dublin: Royal Irish Academy. Ferriter, D. (2004) The Transformation of Ireland 1900-2000, London: Profile Books.

The Nation State in Transformation

The Nation-State in Tranformation discusses the significance of the state in a globalised economy. Focusing on Denmark and Ireland, the book analyses how small states adapt to the international market and argues that the institutional mediation of globalisation helps us explain why some states seem to possess more capacity to adjust than others. Not only must we bring the state back in,' we must also consider how history, culture and collective identities influence the performance of the nation-state in the new globalised world order. With contributions by Francis Fukuyama, Bob Jessop, David Marsh, John A Hall and John Campbell, Georg Sorensen, Bjorn Hvinden, Rory ODonnell, Peadar Kirby, Joseph Ruane, Brian Girvin, Sean ORiain, Chris McInerny, Gert and Gunnar Svendsen, Lars Bo Kaspersen and Linda Thorsager, Henrik Bang, and Michael Boss.

The Princeton History of Modern Ireland

The most authoritative overview of the revolution is Charles Townshend's The Republic: The Fight for Irish ... and family history is reflected in Diarmaid Ferriter's The Transformation of Ireland 19002000 (London: Profile, 2004).

The Princeton History of Modern Ireland

An accessible and innovative look at Irish history by some of today's most exciting historians of Ireland This book brings together some of today's most exciting scholars of Irish history to chart the pivotal events in the history of modern Ireland while providing fresh perspectives on topics ranging from colonialism and nationalism to political violence, famine, emigration, and feminism. The Princeton History of Modern Ireland takes readers from the Tudor conquest in the sixteenth century to the contemporary boom and bust of the Celtic Tiger, exploring key political developments as well as major social and cultural movements. Contributors describe how the experiences of empire and diaspora have determined Ireland’s position in the wider world and analyze them alongside domestic changes ranging from the Irish language to the economy. They trace the literary and intellectual history of Ireland from Jonathan Swift to Seamus Heaney and look at important shifts in ideology and belief, delving into subjects such as religion, gender, and Fenianism. Presenting the latest cutting-edge scholarship by a new generation of historians of Ireland, The Princeton History of Modern Ireland features narrative chapters on Irish history followed by thematic chapters on key topics. The book highlights the global reach of the Irish experience as well as commonalities shared across Europe, and brings vividly to life an Irish past shaped by conquest, plantation, assimilation, revolution, and partition.

The Politics and Polemics of Culture in Ireland 1800 2010

Irish Times, 28 December 1907. 51. Nicholas Allen, George Russell and the New Ireland, 1905-30 (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2017), p. 38. 52. Diarmaid Ferriter, The Transformation of Ireland: 19002000 (London: Profile Books, 2004), p.

The Politics and Polemics of Culture in Ireland  1800   2010

As a contribution to cultural policy studies, this book offers a uniquely detailed and comprehensive account of the historical evolution of cultural policies and their contestation within a single democratic polity, while treating these developments comparatively against the backdrop of contemporaneous influences and developments internationally. It traces the climate of debate, policies and institutional arrangements arising from the state’s regulation and administration of culture in Ireland from 1800 to 2010. It traces the influence of precedent and practice developed under British rule in the nineteenth century on government in the 26-county Free State established in 1922 (subsequently declared the Republic of Ireland in 1949). It demonstrates the enduring influence of the liberal principle of minimal intervention in cultural life on the approach of successive Irish governments to the formulation of cultural policy, right up to the 1970s. From 1973 onwards, however, the state began to take a more interventionist and welfarist approach to culture. This was marked by increasing professionalization of the arts and heritage, and a decline in state support for amateur and voluntary cultural bodies. That the state had a more expansive role to play in regulating and funding culture became a norm of cultural discourse.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History

49. diarmaid Ferriter, The Transformation of Ireland 19002000 (london, 2004),334, 10,336–7. 50. For recent research on the family and sexuality, see lindsey earner-Byrne, Mother and Child: Maternity and Child Welfare in Ireland, ...

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History

Draws from a wide range of disciplines to bring together 36 leading scholars writing about 400 years of modern Irish history

That Neutral Island

The description of Ireland as still stuck in 1938 is from Cyril Connolly , ' Comment ' , Horizon 5.25 ( January 1942 ) ... 1921-1936 ( Dublin , 1999 ) ; Diarmaid Ferriter , The Transformation of Ireland 1900-2000 ( London , 2004 ) .

That Neutral Island

When the world descended into war in 1939, a few European countries remained neutral, and few states were more controversial than Ireland. This book takes in the full breadth of the Irish wartime experience, describing a pivotal moment in the history of Anglo-Irish relations.