The Tyranny of Metrics

This book addresses a major problem."--George A. Akerlof, Nobel Prize-winning economist "The Tyranny of Metrics is an important and accessible book about a growing problem.

The Tyranny of Metrics

Today, organizations of all kinds are ruled by the belief that the path to success is quantifying human performance, publicizing the results, and dividing up the rewards based on the numbers. But in our zeal to instill the evaluation process with scientific rigor, we've gone from measuring performance to fixating on measuring itself. The result is a tyranny of metrics that threatens the quality of our lives and most important institutions. In this timely and powerful book, Jerry Muller uncovers the damage our obsession with metrics is causing--and shows how we can begin to fix the problem. Filled with examples from education, medicine, business and finance, government, the police and military, and philanthropy and foreign aid, this brief and accessible book explains why the seemingly irresistible pressure to quantify performance distorts and distracts, whether by encouraging "gaming the stats" or "teaching to the test." That's because what can and does get measured is not always worth measuring, may not be what we really want to know, and may draw effort away from the things we care about. Along the way, we learn why paying for measured performance doesn't work, why surgical scorecards may increase deaths, and much more. But metrics can be good when used as a complement to--rather than a replacement for--judgment based on personal experience, and Muller also gives examples of when metrics have been beneficial. Complete with a checklist of when and how to use metrics, The Tyranny of Metrics is an essential corrective to a rarely questioned trend that increasingly affects us all.

The Tyranny of Metrics

This book addresses a major problem."--George A. Akerlof, Nobel Prize-winning economist "The Tyranny of Metrics is an important and accessible book about a growing problem.

The Tyranny of Metrics

How the obsession with quantifying human performance threatens business, medicine, education, government--and the quality of our lives Today, organizations of all kinds are ruled by the belief that the path to success is quantifying human performance, publicizing the results, and dividing up the rewards based on the numbers. But in our zeal to instill the evaluation process with scientific rigor, we've gone from measuring performance to fixating on measuring itself--and this tyranny of metrics now threatens the quality of our organizations and lives. In this brief, accessible, and powerful book, Jerry Muller uncovers the damage metrics are causing and shows how we can begin to fix the problem. Filled with examples from business, medicine, education, government, and other fields, the book explains why paying for measured performance doesn't work, why surgical scorecards may increase deaths, and much more. But Muller also shows that, when used as a complement to judgment based on personal experience, metrics can be beneficial, and he includes an invaluable checklist of when and how to use them. The result is an essential corrective to a harmful trend that increasingly affects us all.

Minds Wide Shut

Jerry Z. Muller's delightful study The Tyranny of Metrics makes Postman seem all the more prescient.22 Muller examines the cultural paradigm “engulfing an ever- widening range of institutions,” which he calls a “metric fixation.

Minds Wide Shut

"Gary Saul Morson, a literature scholar at Northwestern, and Morton Schapiro, an economist, and president of Northwestern, are authors of our book Cents and Sensibilities, on what economists, who tend to reduce reality to economic fundamentalist thinking, can do to correct and enhance their accounts of social life. In their new book, Morton and Schapiro extend their discussion to encompass not only the market fundamentalism of economics, but various other forms of intellectual fundamentalism from politics through religion through literature. In each case and overall, they emphasize the importance of cross-disciplinary dialogue in correcting the errors of these diferent academics fundamentalisms, while helping to construct richer accounts of culture and society"--

The New Metrics

The tyranny of metrics. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Nowakowska, M. (1990). Cluster analysis, graphs, and branching processes as new methodologies for intelligent systems on example of bibliometric and social network data.

The New Metrics

New methods in bibliometrics and alternative metrics provide us with information about research impact at both increasingly granular and global levels. Here, editor Elaine Lasda and a cast of expert contributors present a variety of case studies that demonstrate the practical utilization of these new scholarly metrics.

The Product Diploma

Understand how to contextualize data, and know when to go against the data (because data is imperfect) There are entire books written about metrics and analytics (two we recommend are Lean Analytics and The Tyranny of Metrics).

The Product Diploma

The complete guide on landing a job as an Associate Product Manager (APM). Two former Google APMs share everything they wish they knew when they were applying for product roles out of college. See a breakdown of what it's like to be a product manager and what a day in the life looks like. Learn how to prepare for APM roles while in college, from what classes to take to what extracurriculars to pursue. Finally, read about how to master the APM interview, from high level strategies to sample interview questions. In 2002, the product executive at Google and future Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer made a big bet. It was the kind of big bet that Google has become known for, but this wasn’t a bet on self-driving cars or a game-changing app. In fact, the bet wasn’t about a product at all - it was about product managers. Back in the early 2000’s product managers were in short supply, or at least the kind that Google was looking for. Google wanted product managers who were deeply technical; people who not only knew how to write code, but who fundamentally understood technology. They also wanted product managers who were hungry and could execute on the smallest details, but who could also think strategically. They weren’t finding what they were looking for in the existing pool of product managers. So Mayer pitched a radical idea: what if Google hired entrepreneurial and talented computer science majors straight out of college and taught them to be product leaders? Google would create a small, close-knit community which could learn the role together as they rotated through different teams in the company. Those in the program would be transformed into the type of product leaders Google wanted - people who could speak in both business and technical terms and who could take products all the way from a high-level idea to a launch. The job would be called Associate Product Manager, or ‘APM’ for short. Fast-forward fifteen years and the Google APM program has become one of Mayer’s most indelible contributions to the search giant. The first class of Google APMs was just 6 people, but today there are over 40 APMs in each class. Google APMs have gone on to become Google VPs, C-level execs of tech giants like Facebook and Asana, and founders of numerous successful startups such as Optimizely. Mayer’s program was such a success that it has been adopted by almost every other tech giant as well as many successful startups. Today, companies like Facebook, Uber, Dropbox, Workday, and LinkedIn all hire product managers out of college into “APM”-like programs. Although there are some subtle differences between each program - Facebook RPMs (rotational product managers) have 6-month rotations versus Google’s year-long rotations, and Microsoft has hundreds of new grad product managers each year - they all have the same foundational goal of finding and developing the product leaders of tomorrow. Today, the product manager role has become one of the most coveted and prestigious jobs for ambitious college students, but it is also one of the most competitive and misunderstood. Perhaps you picked up this book because you heard about the product manager role, and want to understand more about what it is and whether it is right for you. Or, perhaps you heard about how rigorous and intimidating the application and interview processes can be, and you want to get a leg up. We faced those same questions and felt the same way, and that’s why we decided to write this book. Before we became Google APMs we were frantically googling: “Should I be a software engineer or PM out of school?”, “What do companies look for in new grad PMs?”, “How do I prepare for the interviews”, and “What does a PM do exactly?”. At the time, we didn’t find great answers and still there aren’t many answers out there today. This book gives you the answers we were looking for; we’ve synthesized everything we learned through the job search, application, and interview process along with everything we’ve learned on the job. We discuss what it means to be a product manager and why you could be a good (or bad) fit for the role. We talk about what to do during college, across classes, extracurriculars, and internships, to develop the skills that will help you excel as a PM. Finally, we teach you how to land and then nail a product management interview. For each topic we cover, we’ve also asked our peers - new grad PMs from Google, Facebook, and more - to reveal their secrets as well.

Metrics at Work

This distinction between algorithms on the one hand and metrics and analytics on the other hand echoes the one developed by Karin Knorr-Cetina between algorithms and what she analyzes as “scopic systems.” See Knorr-Cetina, Karin, 2003, ...

Metrics at Work

From Circulation Numbers to Web Analytics: Journalists and their Readers in the United States and France -- Utopian Beginnings: A Tale of Two Websites -- Entering the Chase for Clicks: Transatlantic Convergences -- The Multiple Meanings of Clicks: Journalists and Algorithmic Publics -- The Fast and the Slow: Producing Online News in Real Time -- Between Exposure and Unpaid Work: Compensation and Freelance Careers in Online News -- Conclusion.

Identity Ignorance Innovation

See also https://towardsdatascience.com/on-the-tyranny-of-metrics-and-metric-fixation-b4c1d44b5f6c See also ed. R.H. Super, Matthew Arnold, Democratic Education (1962), pp212–43 12 Quoted in Muller, op. cit. pp32–3 13 On this cultural ...

Identity  Ignorance  Innovation

'D'Ancona makes his case well... The book is well written and thoughtful' -- The Times 'A heartfelt attempt to renew liberal ideals for the coming decades... How sorely our public debate needs others to express themselves similarly.' -- Henry Mance, Financial Times 'An urgent and exhilarating account of how populism, prejudice & polarisation have corrupted objective truth and public discourse. D'Ancona's sparkling prose provides an explanation of how we got here and, crucially, how we might get out.' -- James O'Brien 'A book so rich in thought, wisdom and persuasion I find myself sharing the ideas within it with everyone I meet... In the much-mourned absence of Christopher Hitchens, d'Ancona is fast becoming the voice of enlightenment for our bewildered age.' -- Emily Maitlis 'A tonic for our times that blows open any complacency following Trump's defeat that the demise of populism and nativism is inevitable. In beautifully written prose, D'Ancona puts forward hopeful ideas and timely inspiration for a progressive politics to replace it.' -- David Lammy 'A brilliant, lucid, fearless tract, just what the historical moment ordered.' -- Andrew O'Hagan 'D'Ancona's regular practical suggestions help to take it beyond mere theory and into the real world... Decision-makers would do well to read it.' -- Charlotte Henry, TLS *** This is a call to arms. The old tools of political analysis are obsolete - they have rusted and are no longer fit for purpose. We've grown lazy, wedded to the assumption that, after ruptures such as Brexit, the pandemic, and the rise of the populist Right, things will eventually go 'back to normal'. Award-winning political writer Matthew d'Ancona invites you to think afresh: to seek new ways of challenging political extremism, bombastic populism and democratic torpor on both Left and Right. In this ground-breaking book, he proposes a new way of understanding our era and plots a way forward. With rigorous analysis, he argues that we need to understand the world in a new way, with a framework built from the three I's: Identity, Ignorance and Innovation.

Analytics Stories

You would think that after a metric becomes an important component of hospital ratings, hospitals would improve on that metric. Wrong again! Again, as pointed out in The Tyranny of Metrics (pages 115–116), since Medicare began reporting ...

Analytics Stories

Inform your own analyses by seeing how one of the best data analysts in the world approaches analytics problems Analytics Stories: How to Make Good Things Happen is a thoughtful, incisive, and entertaining exploration of the application of analytics to real-world problems and situations. Covering fields as diverse as sports, finance, politics, healthcare, and business, Analytics Stories bridges the gap between the oft inscrutable world of data analytics and the concrete problems it solves. Distinguished professor and author Wayne L. Winston answers questions like: Was Liverpool over Barcelona the greatest upset in sports history? Was Derek Jeter a great infielder What's wrong with the NFL QB rating? How did Madoff keep his fund going? Does a mutual fund’s past performance predict future performance? What caused the Crash of 2008? Can we predict where crimes are likely to occur? Is the lot of the American worker improving? How can analytics save the US Republic? The birth of evidence-based medicine: How did James Lind know citrus fruits cured scurvy? How can I objectively compare hospitals? How can we predict heart attacks in real time? How does a retail store know if you're pregnant? How can I use A/B testing to improve sales from my website? How can analytics help me write a hit song? Perfect for anyone with the word “analyst” in their job title, Analytics Stories illuminates the process of applying analytic principles to practical problems and highlights the potential pitfalls that await careless analysts.

The Matter of Facts

12 The Tyranny of Metrics Despite its inadequacies, journal impact factor became a proxy for research quality, a metric commonly used by institutes, research groups, and grant and promotion committees to assess research and even ...

The Matter of Facts

How biases, the desire for a good narrative, reliance on citation metrics, and other problems undermine confidence in modern science. Modern science is built on experimental evidence, yet scientists are often very selective in deciding what evidence to use and tend to disagree about how to interpret it. In The Matter of Facts, Gareth and Rhodri Leng explore how scientists produce and use evidence. They do so to contextualize an array of problems confronting modern science that have raised concerns about its reliability: the widespread use of inappropriate statistical tests, a shortage of replication studies, and a bias in both publishing and citing “positive” results. Before these problems can be addressed meaningfully, the authors argue, we must understand what makes science work and what leads it astray. The myth of science is that scientists constantly challenge their own thinking. But in reality, all scientists are in the business of persuading other scientists of the importance of their own ideas, and they do so by combining reason with rhetoric. Often, they look for evidence that will support their ideas, not for evidence that might contradict them; often, they present evidence in a way that makes it appear to be supportive; and often, they ignore inconvenient evidence. In a series of essays focusing on controversies, disputes, and discoveries, the authors vividly portray science as a human activity, driven by passion as well as by reason. By analyzing the fluidity of scientific concepts and the dynamic and unpredictable development of scientific fields, the authors paint a picture of modern science and the pressures it faces.

Against Free Speech

Jerry Z. Muller, “The Tyranny of Metrics: The Quest to Quantify Everything Undermines Higher Education”, Chronicle of Higher Education, January 21, 2018, https://www.chronicle.com/article/The-Tyranny-of-Metrics/242269. 61.

Against Free Speech

Leaker critiques the role that the defence of free speech has played in legitimising the scapegoating of oppressed minorities while deflecting attention from the egregious operations of power that have led to ever greater inequality, injustice and capitalist destruction.--Nick Riemer, Senior Lecturer in English, University of Sydney

Understanding Contemporary Issues in Higher Education

Muller, J. (2018a) The Tyranny of Metrics: The Quest to Quantify Everything Undermines Higher Education. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 64(20), pp. 1–7. Naidoo, R. (2016) The Competition Fetish in Higher Education: Varieties, ...

Understanding Contemporary Issues in Higher Education

This insightful book offers a wide-ranging collection of lively discussions on contemporary issues, policies and practices in higher education. Bartram integrates contributions from experienced academics, teachers and students in a unique approach and structure, designed to enable students with both specific and wide-ranging interests in higher education to extend their understanding. Including discussion points, research tasks and suggestions on further reading in each chapter, Understanding Contemporary Issues in Higher Education discusses a range of topics, such as: universities and the mental health ‘crisis’; knowledge, the state and the market; the role of technology in teaching and academic celebrification; disability, diversity and inclusive placement learning. Written specifically for Education Studies students, this book constitutes a timely addition to student-focused themed studies looking at aspects of higher education.

Co Creativity and Engaged Scholarship

Muller (2018) refers to the resulting system as a “tyranny of metrics”: a faith in objective and quantifiable measurability as a replacement for subjective and qualitative human judgement. The tyranny of metrics can also be described ...

Co Creativity and Engaged Scholarship

This open access book explores creative and collaborative forms of research praxis within the social sustainability sciences. The term co-creativity is used in reference to both individual methods and overarching research approaches. Supported by a series of in-depth examples, the edited collection critically reviews the potential of co-creative research praxis to nurture just and transformative processes of change. Included amongst the individual chapters are first-hand accounts of such as: militant research strategies and guerrilla narrative, decolonial participative approaches, appreciative inquiry and care-ethics, deep-mapping, photo-voice, community-arts, digital participatory mapping, creative workshops and living labs. The collection considers how, through socially inclusive forms of action and reflection, such co-creative methods can be used to stimulate alternative understandings of why and how things are, and how they could be. It provides illustrations of (and problematizes) the use of co-creative methods as overtly disruptive interventions in their own right, and as a means of enriching the transformative potential of transdisciplinary and more traditional forms of social science research inquiry. The positionality of the researcher, together with the emotional and embodied dimensions of engaged scholarship, are threads which run throughout the book. So too does the question of how to communicate sustainability science research in a meaningful way.

The Tyranny of Change

Impact of Mixed Metrics on Clustering * Karina Gibert and Ramon Nonell Department of Statistics and Operation Research , Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya , C. Pau Gargallo 5 , Barcelona 08028 , SPAIN ...

The Tyranny of Change

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Suffering and the Intelligence of Love in the Teaching Life

J. Z. Muller, The Tyranny of Metrics (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018), 67–88. ... Metric Power (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016); and C. N. Davidson, The New Education: How to Revolutionize the University to Prepare ...

Suffering and the Intelligence of Love in the Teaching Life

This book shares insights drawn from the diverse voices of public school teachers, community outreach education workers, professors, writers, poets, artists, and musicians on suffering in school and the classroom. Teachers speak about their own encounters with and perceptions from suffering using critical-analytic textual works, as well as first-hand personally reflective accounts. By sharing their stories and reflections, the editors and contributors shed light upon the dark areas that often are not addressed in Teacher Training Programs, and that generally remain unaddressed and unacknowledged even as teachers become well-established as professionals in the field of education.

Transforming Organizations

The current preference organizations have for metrics has the potential to set distorted priorities. ... Recently, historian Jerry Z. Muller argued in The Tyranny of Metrics,8 that our society has become obsessed with valuing metrics to ...

Transforming Organizations

In a world where current political climates and management cultures make risk aversion commonplace, Transforming Organizations shows how all organizations, including large and cumbersome institutions, can transform to suit the needs of our rapidly evolving economic and social realities. This book looks at how organizations and their leaders can adapt to an increasingly volatile and uncertain operating environment through the 4Cs: Creativity Critical reflection Communication Collaboration Based on extensive research in the education, organizational and business sectors, Michael Anderson and Miranda Jefferson show how the 4Cs can be embedded, embodied and enacted in many different types of organizations to make them more responsive to emerging challenges, threats and opportunities. Transforming Organizations highlights clear links between leading and learning – because leadership is no longer (if it ever was) just a role for CEOs, CFOs and senior managers. For organizations to be flexible and agile in the 21st century, all employees must have the opportunity to exercise leadership. But this can only happen if deep learning is a standard feature of a leadership approach that actively and deliberately incorporates key 21st-century skills – the 4Cs themselves. There is a substantial gap between companies knowing what they should do to be flexible, creative and have clear channels of communication, and how to make that a reality. Transforming Organizations provides the evidence and inspiration necessary for doing business differently. Written for those who have become disillusioned or frustrated with business practices that cannot meet the fast-moving demands of the 21st century, the book provides strategies and approaches developed from the authors' work in real organizations in order to implement change and see organizations transform for the better.

The Tyranny of the Ideal

Suppose that the investigators now all agree on every element of perspective Σ except the metric of ... Consider for instance the most minimal and straightforward way in which two distance metrics, d1 and d2, might differ from one ...

The Tyranny of the Ideal

In his provocative new book, The Tyranny of the Ideal, Gerald Gaus lays out a vision for how we should theorize about justice in a diverse society. Gaus shows how free and equal people, faced with intractable struggles and irreconcilable conflicts, might share a common moral life shaped by a just framework. He argues that if we are to take diversity seriously and if moral inquiry is sincere about shaping the world, then the pursuit of idealized and perfect theories of justice—essentially, the entire production of theories of justice that has dominated political philosophy for the past forty years—needs to change. Drawing on recent work in social science and philosophy, Gaus points to an important paradox: only those in a heterogeneous society—with its various religious, moral, and political perspectives—have a reasonable hope of understanding what an ideally just society would be like. However, due to its very nature, this world could never be collectively devoted to any single ideal. Gaus defends the moral constitution of this pluralistic, open society, where the very clash and disagreement of ideals spurs all to better understand what their personal ideals of justice happen to be. Presenting an original framework for how we should think about morality, The Tyranny of the Ideal rigorously analyzes a theory of ideal justice more suitable for contemporary times.

Post Rational Planning

In his recent book, The Tyranny of Metrics, American economic historian Jerry Muller (2018) critiques the overuse of metrics and their most problematic assumptions: (1) that measurement is a good substitute for professional judgement; ...

Post Rational Planning

Post-Rational Planning confronts today’s threats to truth, particularly after recent news events that present alternative facts and media smear campaigns, often described as post-truth politics. At the same time, it appreciates critical tensions: between rationality (prized by planners and other policy professionals) and desires for positive, socially just outcomes. Rather than abandoning quests for truth, this book provides planners, policy professionals, and students with tools for better responding to debates over truth. Post-Rational Planning examines planners’ unease with emotion and politics, advocating for more scholarship and practice capable of unpacking uses of rhetoric and framing to support or counter key planning decisions impacting social justice. This includes learning from recent works engaging with rhetoric, narrative construction, and framing in planning, while introducing other valuable concepts from disciplines like psychology, including confirmation bias; identity-protective cognition; from marketing and adult education. Each chapter sheds new light on a specific topic requiring a response through post-rational practice. It starts with recent research findings, then demonstrates them with case examples, enabling their use in classroom and practice settings. Each chapter ends by summarizing key lessons in "Take-aways for Practice," better enabling readers of all levels to synthesize and use key ideas.

Ranking

31 Tyranny of metrics? I was already working on this project when the closest book to my subject was published.32 Jerry Z. Muller's The Tyranny of Metrics studies our obsession with metrics, and Muller lists what he calls the unintended ...

Ranking

Human beings are competitive. We want to know who is the strongest, who is the richest, and who is the cleverest of all. Some situations, like ranking people based on height, can be ranked in objective ways. However, many "Top Ten" lists are based on subjective categorization and give only the illusion of objectivity. In fact, we don't always want to be seen objectively since we don't mind having a better image or rank than deserved. Ranking: The Unwritten Rules of the Social Game We All Play applies scientific theories to everyday experience by raising and answering questions like: Are college ranking lists objective? How do we rank and rate countries based on their fragility, level of corruption, or even happiness? How do we find the most relevant web pages? How are employees ranked? This book is for people who have a neighbor with a fancier car; employees, who are being ranked by their supervisors; managers, who are involved in ranking but may have qualms about the process; businesspeople interested in creating better visibility for their companies; scientists, writers, artists, and other competitors who would like to see themselves at the top of a success list; or college students who are just preparing to enter a new phase of social competition. Readers will engage in an intellectual adventure to better understand the difficulties of navigating between objectivity and subjectivity and to better identify and modify their place in real and virtual communities by combining human and computational intelligence.

Leading Educational Systems and Schools in Times of Disruption and Exponential Change

Muller (2018), in The Tyranny of Metrics, cautioned about the possible consequences of our contemporary obsession with comprehensive assessment regimes, data use, and metrics generally. He stated that there are: [.

Leading Educational Systems and Schools in Times of Disruption and Exponential Change

This book provides an analysis of the impact of disruptive environments on education and closely examines national and international research-based literature on how educational systems in a number of countries are successfully transforming educational delivery processes to better prepare students for an increasingly disrupted world.

Hunger

And this introduces the tyranny of metrics. Concretistic symptoms essentially serve the function of maintaining the cohesion and stability of a tenuous sense of self. This formulation suggests that problems in the integration of psychic ...

Hunger

This work presents the adaptation of mentalization-based therapy for use in Eating Disorders (MBT-ED). The book starts with a presentation of the theoretical concept of mentalization and describes eating disorders from this perspective. This is followed by a discussion of the place of MBT-ED in eating disorders practice. MBT is first presented as the original model for borderline personality disorder, and then the model is further developed to address specific symptoms found in eating disorders, such as body image disturbance, restriction and purging. The original MBT model consists of outpatient treatment combined with individual and group psychotherapy, and psychoeducation in groups. The book then looks at supervision and training, and how an eating disorders team can develop a mentalizing focus. It goes on to describe the training required for practitioners to deliver individual and group MBT-ED and to supervise therapy. Lastly, it examines the implementation of the approach in different clinical settings, including inpatient services, and how management can be involved in negotiating barriers and taking advantage of enablers in the system. The authors have conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial and qualitative research in MBT-ED and have extensive experience in providing and supervising this novel therapy. MBT-ED is one of the few therapies for eating disorders that links theory of mind, and attachment and psychodynamic therapies and as such will be of great theoretical interest to a wide variety of clinicians and researchers.