The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing

Rather different philosophical theories and arguments lend themselves to different forms of expression. One occasionally hears complaints that Plato, Hume, or Kant did not write in a manner more akin to the current mode of philosophical ...

The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing

In The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing, Jon Stewart argues that there is a close relation between content and form in philosophical writing. While this might seem obvious at first glance, it is overlooked in the current climate of Anglophone academic philosophy, which, Stewart contends, accepts only a single genre as proper for philosophical expression. Stewart demonstrates the uniformity of today's philosophical writing by contrasting it with that of the past. Taking specific texts from the history of philosophy and literature as case studies, Stewart shows how the use of genres like dialogues, plays and short stories were an entirely suitable and effective means of presenting and arguing for philosophical positions given the concrete historical and cultural contexts in which they appeared. Now, Stewart argues, the prevailing intolerance means that the same texts are dismissed as unphilosophical merely due to their form, although their content is, in fact, profoundly philosophical. The book's challenge to current conventions of philosophical is provocative and timely, and will be of great interest to students and scholars of philosophy, literature and history.

The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing

The book's challenge to current conventions of philosophical is provocative and timely, and will be of great interest to students and scholars of philosophy, literature and history."--Bloomsbury Publishing

The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing


Absolute in History The

The Philosophy and Theology of History in Schelling's Late Philosophy Kasper, Walter ... 12 Already in Schelling's first writing, this ultimate unity of form and content, of thinking and being was the point of departure for his ...

Absolute in History  The

Walter Kasper explains that the interest of theology has been broken off by idealistic thinking, and advocates a new discussion between theology and idealism, of the fundamental importance of the theology of the twentieth century.

Soren Kierkegaard Subjectivity Irony the Crisis of Modernity

The book takes as its starting point the statement made by Kierkegaard towards the end of his life in which he claimed the model for his work had always been Socrates, and traces this influence on Kierkegaard's development as philosopher ...

Soren Kierkegaard  Subjectivity  Irony    the Crisis of Modernity

Soren Kierkegaard: Subjectivity, Irony, and the Crisis of Modernity examines the thought of Soren Kierkegaard, a unique figure, who has inspired, provoked, fascinated, and irritated people ever since he walked the streets of Copenhagen. At the end of his life, Kierkegaard said that the only model he had for his work was the Greek philosopher Socrates. This work takes this statement as its point of departure. Jon Stewart explores what Kierkegaard meant by this and to show how different aspects of his writing and argumentative strategy can be traced back to Socrates. The main focus is The Concept of Irony, which is a key text at the beginning of Kierkegaard's literary career. Although it was an early work, it nevertheless played a determining role in his later development and writings. Indeed, it can be said that it laid the groundwork for much of what would appear in his later famous books such as Either/Or and Fear and Trembling.

Dialectic and Dialogue

What must be noted, however, is that Hermann not only accepts Schleiermacher's thesis concerning the unity of form and content in Plato's philosophy (345), but actually grounds his own developmentalist thesis upon this unity (370-71).

Dialectic and Dialogue

Dialectic and Dialogue seeks to define the method and the aims of Plato's dialectic in both the "inconclusive" dialogues and the dialogues that describe and practice a method of hypothesis. Departing from most treatments of Plato, Gonzalez argues that the philosophical knowledge at which dialectic aims is nonpropositional, practical, and reflexive. The result is a reassessment of how Plato understood the nature of philosophy.

Philosophical Writings Philosophische Schriften

The highest form of creativity in turn is the figure which bears the intellect, a figure in which ideality and ... one can speak of established functions of meaning, whereby these are further determined either by content or form.

Philosophical Writings   Philosophische Schriften


The Perfection of Freedom

... an attention to the aesthetic dimension of his philosophical writing.14 Third, a basic principle in Schiller's writing, and indeed in his sense of being in general, is the ideal of inseparable unity between form and contenta unity, ...

The Perfection of Freedom

The Perfection of Freedom seeks to respond to the impoverished conventional notion of freedom through a recovery of an understanding rich with possibilities yet all but forgotten in contemporary thought. This understanding, developed in different but complementary ways by the German thinkers Schiller, Schelling, and Hegel, connects freedom, not exclusively with power and possibility, but rather, most fundamentally, with completion, wholeness, and actuality. What is unique here is specifically the interpretation of freedom in terms of form, whether it be aesthetic form (Schiller), organic form (Schelling), or social form (Hegel). Although this book presents serious criticisms of the three philosophers, it shows that they open new avenues for reflection on the notion of freedom; avenues that promise to overcome many of the dichotomies that continue to haunt contemporary thought - for example, between freedom and order, freedom and nature, and self and other. The Perfection of Freedom offers not only a significantly new interpretation of Schiller, Schelling, and Hegel, but also proposes a modernity more organically rooted in the ancient and classical Christian worlds.

Philosophy of Right

As a philosophic writing it must be on its guard against constructing a state as it ought to be. Philosophy cannot ... This also is the more concrete meaning of what was a moment ago more abstractly called the unity of form and content.

Philosophy of Right

Complete and unabridged, this edition of Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel's 1821 classic offers a comprehensive view of the philosopher's influential system. In the Philosophy of Right, Hegel applies his most important concept--the dialectics--to law, rights, morality, the family, economics, and the state. The last of Hegel's works to be published in his lifetime, this volume combines moral and political philosophy to form a sociologic view dominated by the idea of the state. Hegel defines universal right as the synthesis between the thesis of an individual acting in accordance with the law and the occasional conflict of an antithetical desire to follow private convictions. The state, he declares, must permit individuals to satisfy both demands, thereby realizing social harmony and prosperity--the perfect synthesis. Further, Hegel renounces his formerly favorable assessment of the French Revolution and rejects the republican form of government, suggesting instead an idealized form of a constitutional monarchy, in which ultimate power rests with the sovereign.

The Philosophy of Right

This is also what constitutes the more concrete meaning of what was designated above as the unity of form and content: form in its most concrete sense is reason as the knowing that grasps conceptually, and content is reason as the ...

The Philosophy of Right

A modern, highly readable translation of a primary text in Western philosophy. Complete translation in English with introduction, notes and glossary. The glossary is keyed to the primary occurrences of important terms in the text and provides insights into the concepts beyond the translation, especially useful pedagogical device for students coming to Hegel for the first time. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Hegel’s immediate audience.

Metaphysics Method and Politics

The Political Philosophy of R.G. Collingwood James Connelly ... 93 This , in outline , is the scale of forms ; and it is a method typical of philosophical writing . ... 96 . Metaphysics and Method : A Necessary Unity 79.

Metaphysics  Method and Politics

This book argues that Collingwood developed a complete political philosophy of civilization. It also demonstrates that his philosophical work comprises a unity in which there is no fundamental discontinuity between his earlier and later writings.

Sor Juana

Form. and. Content. The use of poetry and drama as a theological resource poses interesting questions for contemporary ... And those contents are very profound, taken from theology and Scholastic philosophy, and taken to a successful ...

Sor Juana

Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, a seventeenth-century Mexican nun, is one of the most compelling figures of her age. A prolific writer, a learned scholar, and the first woman theologian of the Americas, she was also a defender of the dignity and rights of women in the midst of a fiercely patriarchal culture. In this study, Michelle Gonzalez examines Sor Juana’s contributions as a foremother of many currents of contemporary theology. In particular, in joining aesthetics with the quest for truth and justice, her work and witness suggest new avenues for Hispanic, feminist, and other liberation theologies.

S ren Kierkegaard

The book takes as its starting point the statement made by Kierkegaard towards the end of his life in which he claimed the model for his work had always been Socrates, and traces this influence on Kierkegaard's development as philosopher ...

S  ren Kierkegaard

Soren Kierkegaard: Subjectivity, Irony, and the Crisis of Modernity examines the thought of Soren Kierkegaard, a unique figure, who has inspired, provoked, fascinated, and irritated people ever since he walked the streets of Copenhagen. At the end of his life, Kierkegaard said that the only model he had for his work was the Greek philosopher Socrates. This work takes this statement as its point of departure. Jon Stewart explores what Kierkegaard meant by this and to show how different aspects of his writing and argumentative strategy can be traced back to Socrates. The main focus is The Concept of Irony, which is a key text at the beginning of Kierkegaard's literary career. Although it was an early work, it nevertheless played a determining role in his later development and writings. Indeed, it can be said that it laid the groundwork for much of what would appear in his later famous books such as Either/Or and Fear and Trembling.

The Fall of Language

Philosophy inherits, or ought to inherit, from religion, then, not the content of doctrine itself but this holistic representation of experience. This provides an ideal—whether it is called God, spirit, the absolute, or the unity of ...

The Fall of Language

This book explores the nature of meaning, primarily through readings of the work of Walter Benjamin and Ludwig Wittgenstein. Alexander Stern offers a critical analysis of Benjamin's philosophy of language, finding in it a common root with Wittgenstein's thought on language, and traces the historical foundation of both accounts of meaning to eighteenth- and nineteenth-century German philosophy. Benjamin's theory of language is notoriously dense and obscure. In elucidating it, Stern emphasizes Benjamin's attempt to reorient the Kantian project around language-the medium in which knowledge is expressed-and his concern with the logical understanding of language gaining credence in the work of Bertrand Russell and Gottlob Frege. The result is a radical model of the relationship between language, experience, and the world that sees "absolutely everything" as linguistic in a broadened sense and which sees the logical or designative capacities of language as grounded in an aesthetic foundation. Wittgenstein and Benjamin are read in the book as complementary to one another, sharing comparable critiques of empiricism and comparable accounts of concept use, linguistic understanding, and the relation between experience and language. Although this similarity breaks down over Wittgenstein's account of the "experience of meaning," which is subordinated to his account of meaning as use, Stern argues that Benjamin's theory of language can productively address some unresolved issues in Wittgenstein's understanding of meaning.--

A Companion to Kierkegaard

Jon Stewart, one of the world’s leading experts on the work of Søren Kierkegaard, has here compiled the most comprehensive single-volume overview of Kierkegaard studies currently available.

A Companion to Kierkegaard

Jon Stewart, one of the world s leading experts on the work of Søren Kierkegaard, has here compiled the most comprehensive single-volume overview of Kierkegaard studies currently available. Includes contributions from an international array of Kierkegaard scholars from across the disciplines Covers all of the major disciplines within the broad field of Kierkegaard research, including philosophy; theology and religious studies; aesthetics, the arts and literary theory; and social sciences and politics Elucidates Kierkegaard s contribution to each of these areas through examining the sources he drew upon, charting the reception of his ideas, and analyzing his unique conceptual insights into each topic Demystifies the complex field of Kierkegaard studies creating an accessible entry-point into his thought and writings for readers new to his work

Politics Philosophy Writing

The collection is intended to demonstrate the unity of Plato's concerns , the literary quality of his writing , and the integral relation of form and content in his work . Taken together , these essays show the consistency of Plato's ...

Politics  Philosophy  Writing

The leading scholars represented in Politics, Philosophy, Writing examine six key Platonic dialogues and the most important of the epistles, moving from Plato's most public or political writings to his most philosophical. The collection is intended to demonstrate the unity of Plato's concerns, the literary quality of his writing, and the integral relation of form and content in his work. Taken together, these essays show the consistency of Plato's understanding of the political art, the art of writing, and the philosophical life. Studies emphasizing the unity of Plato's lifework have given way in recent scholarship to specialized and overspecialized examinations of individual dialogues. While each of the contributors to Politics, Philosophy, Writing studies one text, his or her work is oriented toward illuminating the whole of Plato's project. Each of the essays is an innovative contribution to scholarship on its topic; as a collection, they constitute a unique reading of Plato's political philosophy. Plato scholars have generally divided themselves into two camps: those who concentrate on the analytic or logical aspects of the dialogues, and those who concentrate on the literary-critical features. In one camp are the philologists and classicists, and in the other, the writers of inventive interpretive commentaries. By avoiding distinctions between Plato the poet and Plato the philosopher, Politics, Philosophy, Writing allows a deeper exploration of the comprehensiveness of Plato's theoretical vision and illuminates the lasting challenge of his understanding of the human condition.

S ren Kierkegaard

This work takes as its starting point the statement made by Kierkegaard towards the end of his life in which he claimed the model for his work had always been Socrates, and traces this influence on Kierkegaard's development as philosopher ...

S  ren Kierkegaard

Soren Kierkegaard: subjectivity, irony, and the crisis of Modernity' examines the thought of Soren Kierkegaard, a unique figure, who has inspired, provoked, fascinated, and irritated people ever since he walked the streets of Copenhagen. At the end of his life, Kierkegaard said that the only model he had for his work was the Greek philosopher Socrates. This work takes this statement as its point of departure. Jon Stewart explores what Kierkegaard meant by this and to show how different aspects of his writing and argumentative strategy can be traced back to Socrates. The main focus is 'The Concept of Irony; , which is a key text at the beginning of Kierkegaard's literary career. Although it was an early work, it nevertheless played a determining role in his later development and writings. Indeed, it can be said that it laid the groundwork for much of what would appear in his later famous books such as 'Either/Or' and 'Fear and Trembling'.

Politics Philosophy Writing

Taken together, these essays show the consistency of Plato's understanding of the political art, the art of writing, and the philosophical life.

Politics  Philosophy  Writing

The leading scholars represented in Politics, Philosophy, Writing examine six key Platonic dialogues and the most important of the epistles, moving from Plato's most public or political writings to his most philosophical. The collection is intended to demonstrate the unity of Plato's concerns, the literary quality of his writing, and the integral relation of form and content in his work. Taken together, these essays show the consistency of Plato's understanding of the political art, the art of writing, and the philosophical life.

Berichten uit het Verre Oosten

Can those who write about philosophy change the form of their writing ? ... affirmation and negation , phenomenon and essence , content and form , necessity and freedom , possibility and reality , etc. , all unity of opposites .

Berichten uit het Verre Oosten


Truth and Historicity

It means to display the unity of thought and reality — i.e . the True — but all it can say is that this is what truth consists in ; that unity cannot actually be achieved in his philosophical writing itself .

Truth and Historicity

In this scholarly but non-technical book, Campbell elucidates the concept of truth by tracing its history, from the ancient Greek idea that truth is timeless, unchanging, and free from all relativism, through the seventeenth-century crisis which led to the collapse of that idea, and then on through the emergence of historical consciousness to the existentialist, sociological, and linguistic approaches of our own time. He gives a scholarly but vivid and economical exposition of the views of a remarkably wide range of thinkers, always showing how their ideas engage with our contemporary concerns. He argues that current problems with truth arise from the way differing past conceptions continue to resound in our contemporary use of the word, and suggests that we must formulate a new conception of truth that is compatible with awareness that human existence is finite and contingent--with awareness of our own historicity.

Scientific and Primordial Knowing

He was a firm believer in the unity of form and content . The content , truth , exists for philosophy , he was convinced , only in its systematic conceptual form ... But though Hegel had little use for philosophies which took short ...

Scientific and Primordial Knowing

This book is an investigation into the Western philosophical tradition to determine the balance struck between the knowing of science, and a more personal, intuitive, preconceptual or primordial knowing. The Greeks made a once-and-for-all breakthrough into a scientific mode of thought, utilizing techniques of definition, syllogism, logic and a precise notion of science. In the Greek ideal of science, the medieval attempt to make theology the queen of the sciences, and modern triumph of the physical sciences, such scientific knowing has held the primacy in ancient, medieval and modern thought throughout the Western philosophical tradition. But that does not exhaust the story of human knowing. Personal knowing, artistic knowing, religious knowing, and the more intuitive modes of Eastern thought are all authentic and know more than they can say. At a time when Enlightenment rationalism and even science is coming under increased questioning, this is a timely survey of the forgotten resources of the Western tradition.