The Urban South

The Urban South


The Social Origins of the Urban South

CHAPTER I The Grand Ole Opry and the Urban South ne Saturday evening in 1927 , George D. Hay , the program director One Nashville radio station WSM ...

The Social Origins of the Urban South

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, thousands of black and white southerners left farms and rural towns to try their fate in the region's cities. This transition brought about significant economic, social, and cultural changes in both ur

The Urban South

See Larsen, Urban South, 120. 24. Social Statistics of Cities, 2:46. See Martin W. Melosi, Garbage in the Cities: Refuse, Reform, and the Environment ...

The Urban South

In this panoramic survey of urbanization in the American South from its beginnings in the colonial period through the "Sunbelt" era of today, Lawrence Larsen examines both the ways in which southern urbanization has paralleled that of other regions and the distinctive marks of "southernness" in the historical process. Larsen is the first historian to show that southern cities developed in "layers" spreading ever westward in response to the expanding transportation needs of the Cotton Kingdom. Yet in other respects, southern cities developed in much the same way as cities elsewhere in America, despite the constraints of regional, racial, and agrarian factors. And southern urbanites, far from resisting change, quickly seized upon technological innovations- most recently air conditioning- to improve the quality of urban life. Treating urbanization as an independent variable without an ideological foundation, Larsen demonstrates that focusing on the introduction of certain city services, such as sewerage and professional fire departments, enables the historian to determine points of urban progress. Larsen's landmark study provides a new perspective not only on a much ignored aspect of the history of the South but also on the relationship of the distinctive cities of the Old South to the new concept of the Sunbelt city. Carrying his story down to the present, he concludes that southern cities have gained parity with others throughout America. This important work will be of value to all students of the South as well as to urban historians.

Opportunities and Deprivation in the Urban South

In broad terms, this indicates an opposite direction to the isolationist and segregating social and urban contexts that produce the impoverishment of public ...

Opportunities and Deprivation in the Urban South

Contending that everyday sociability and social networks are central elements to an understanding of urban poverty, Opportunities and Deprivation in the Urban South draws on detailed research conducted in São Paulo in an examination of the social networks of individuals who identify as poor. The book uses a multi-methods approach not only to test the importance of networks, but also to disentangle the effects of networks and segregation and to specify the relational and spatial mechanisms associated with the production of poverty. It thus explores the different types of network that exist amongst the metropolitan poor, the conditions that shape and influence them, their consequences for the production of poverty and the mechanisms through which networks influence daily living conditions. A rigorous examination of poverty in a contemporary megacity, Opportunities and Deprivation in the Urban South will appeal to sociologists, political scientists and geographers with interests in urban studies, poverty and segregation and social networks.

The Urban South and the Coming of the Civil War

In the urban South , the initial phase of party realignment resulted in a reconstruction of Jacksonian party politics that adapted the familiar practices of ...

The Urban South and the Coming of the Civil War

Book Review

The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South 1918 1942

... studies on American Garveyism noted the existence ofUNIA branches inthe South,but ... The Riseand Fall ofthe GarveyMovement in the Urban South provides ...

The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South  1918 1942

The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South provides the first detailed examination of the Universal Negro Improvement Association's rise, maturation, and eventual decline in the urban South between 1918 and 1942. It examines the ways in which Southern black workers fused locally-based traditions, ideologies, and strategies of resistance with the Pan-African agenda of the UNIA to create a dynamic and multifaceted movement. A testament to the multidimensionality of black political subjectivity, Southern Garveyites fashioned a politics reflective of their international, regional, and local attachments. Moving beyond the usual focus on New York and the charismatic personality of Marcus Garvey, this book situates black workers at the center of its analysis and aims to provide a much-needed grassroots perspective on the Garvey movement. More than simply providing a regional history of one of the most important Pan-African movements of the twentieth century, The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South demonstrates the ways in which racial, class, and spatial dynamics resulted in complex, and at times competing articulations of black nationalism.

On the Margins of Urban South Korea

Bridging area and postcolonial studies with the critical political economy of South Korea.

On the Margins of Urban South Korea

Bridging area and postcolonial studies with the critical political economy of South Korea.

The Urban South

The Urban South

This new bibliography provides scholars and students with a comprehensive reference guide to the literature on southern cities. Brown accepts the U.S. Census Bureau's definition of southern as including the District of Columbia, Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. Her definition of urban is much broader and more comprehensive so as to include American Indian settlements, ethnic communities, ghost towns, and other combinations of people and buildings. The book brings together material from many disciplines in the sciences, social sciences, the arts, and humanities. Items cited include professional journals, books, theses, and dissertations. The bibliography is divided into three sections by type of literature covered. Each section is in turn divided into broad subject categories. The individual entries are numbered and cross-referenced by subject, and are also included in a geographical index. Research libraries, southern college libraries, public libraries in larger southern cities, and southern city and state historical societies will want to acquire this unique bibliography for their reference collections.

The Separate City

Within the separate city itself, internal conflicts reflected a structural divide between an empowered black middle class and a larger group comprising the working class and the disadvantaged.

The Separate City

A ground-breaking collaborative study merging perspectives from history, political science, and urban planning, The Separate City is a trenchant analysis of the development of the African-American community in the urban South. While similar in some respects to the racially defined ghettos of the North, the districts in which southern blacks lived from the pre-World War II era to the mid-1960s differed markedly from those of their northern counterparts. The African- American community in the South was (and to some extent still is) a physically expansive, distinct, and socially heterogeneous zone within the larger metropolis. It found itself functioning both politically and economically as a "separate city" -- a city set apart from its predominantly white counterpart. Within the separate city itself, internal conflicts reflected a structural divide between an empowered black middle class and a larger group comprising the working class and the disadvantaged. Even with these conflicts, the South's new black leadership gained political control in many cities, but it could not overcome the economic forces shaping the metropolis. The persistence of a separate city admitted to the profound ineffectiveness of decades of struggle to eliminate the racial barriers with which southern urban leaders -- indeed all urban America -- continue to grapple today.

Confederate Cities

By demanding a more holistic reading of the South, this collection speaks to contemporary Civil War scholars and classrooms alike not least in providing surprisingly fresh perspectives on a well-studied war."

Confederate Cities

When we talk about the Civil War, it is often with references to battles like Antietam, Gettysburg, Bull Run, and, perhaps most tellingly, the Battle of the Wilderness, which all took place in the countryside or in small towns. Part of the reason this picture has persisted is that few of the historians who have studied the war have been urban historians, even though cities hosted, enabled, and shaped southern society as much as in the North. The essays in Andrew Slap and Frank Towers s collection seek to shift the focus from the agrarian economy that undergirded the South to the cities that served as its political and administrative hubs. By demanding a more holistic reading of the South, this collection speaks to contemporary Civil War scholars and classrooms alike not least in providing surprisingly fresh perspectives on a well-studied war."

The Urban South

Rupert B. Vance, Nicholas J. Demerath. مزدا 3 م م { ۱۰۰۰ جادو ۰۹ بم دارد . به وارد . . THE URBAN SOUTH THE URBAN SOUTH RUPERT B . VANCE.

The Urban South


The Education of Blacks in the South 1860 1935

the South to northern cities, did not slow down during the Great Depression.” City officials and public school authorities in the urban South were shocked ...

The Education of Blacks in the South  1860 1935

James Anderson critically reinterprets the history of southern black education from Reconstruction to the Great Depression. By placing black schooling within a political, cultural, and economic context, he offers fresh insights into black commitment to education, the peculiar significance of Tuskegee Institute, and the conflicting goals of various philanthropic groups, among other matters. Initially, ex-slaves attempted to create an educational system that would support and extend their emancipation, but their children were pushed into a system of industrial education that presupposed black political and economic subordination. This conception of education and social order--supported by northern industrial philanthropists, some black educators, and most southern school officials--conflicted with the aspirations of ex-slaves and their descendants, resulting at the turn of the century in a bitter national debate over the purposes of black education. Because blacks lacked economic and political power, white elites were able to control the structure and content of black elementary, secondary, normal, and college education during the first third of the twentieth century. Nonetheless, blacks persisted in their struggle to develop an educational system in accordance with their own needs and desires.

The South for New Southerners

This was and still is the urban South, a landscape of open windows and front porches framed by wisteria, crepe myrtle, and oak. It is a landscape that seems ...

The South for New Southerners

The South often seems like a foreign country to newcomers from other parts of the United States. And for people from other countries, Southern customs and lifestyle can be even more bewildering. For anyone who has ever wondered why the style of conducting busines in the South is different or why some Southerners are still fighting the Civil War, this book will be a valuable guide. The informative and entertaining essays will help new Southerners understand and appreciate the region and its people, and they will also serve as a refresher course on the South for those who are comfortably settled in. Each of the essays adopts a different perspective to suggest just how the South is different from other American regions. In turn, they examine the special meaning of history for Southerners, the boundaries of the South as a geographical and as an imaginary region, the rhetoric and the reality of Southern race relations, the South's change from a rural to a metropolitan culture, the myth of the Southern belle and the reality of Southern women's lives, the political metamorphosis that turned the Solid South into the Solid Republican South, and the recent transformation of the poorest region in the country into an economic wonder called the Sunbelt. Readers will learn that when Southerners ask strangers what church they attend, the intent is not to pry but to be friendly. They will also discover that "where the kudzu grows" is one of the best ways to define where the South is located. The essays offer the insights of both shcolarship and experience, for the contributors -- most of them originally non-Southerners -- learned about this region by living in it as well as studying it. The contributors are Julia Kirk Blackwelder, Paul D. Escott, David R. Goldfield, Nell Irvin Painter, John Shelton Reed, and Thomas E. Terrill.

Southern Cities Southern Schools

The first study of public schooling in the urban South, this book presents case studies and comparisons of public school systems in six cities in the deep South.

Southern Cities  Southern Schools

The first study of public schooling in the urban South, this book presents case studies and comparisons of public school systems in six cities in the deep South. The authors examine the impact of the conditions that have shaped public education in the urban South, including racism, segregation, poverty, evangelical Protestantism, and the slow pace of industrialization. Among the issues explored are progressive school reform in curriculum and administration, the struggle for greater independence of schools and school systems, city politics, and the politics of black education.

Urban Navigations

This book examines the diverse lived experiences of urban South Asia through a focus on contestations over urban space, resources and habitation, bringing together accounts from India, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri Lanka.

Urban Navigations

This book provides an important account of how the city in South Asia is produced, lived and contested. It examines the diverse lived experiences of urban South Asia through a focus on contestations over urban space, resources and habitation, bringing together accounts from India, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri Lanka. In contrast to accounts that attribute urban transformation mainly to neoliberal globalisation, this book vividly demonstrates how neoliberalism functions as one of the many drivers of urban change. This edited volume brings together an interdisciplinary and international range of established and emerging scholars working on the city in South Asia. To date, South Asian urban studies privilege a handful of cities, particularly in India, overlooking the great diversity, as well as commonalities, of urban experiences spanning the region. Thus, in addition to chapters on New Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore, this volume contains critical urban chapters on less-studied cities such as Lahore, Islamabad, Kathmandu, Colombo and Dhaka. The volume insists that a fresh look at contemporary changes in cities in South Asia requires careful consideration of the specificity of the city, as well as a comparative perspective. It provides a sense not only of the new forms of urbanism emerging in contemporary South Asia, but also sheds light on new theoretical possibilities and directions to make sense of transnational processes and urban change.

Avenues of Faith

Shaping the Urban Religious Culture of Richmond, Virginia, 1900–1929 Samuel C. Shepherd Jr. Take My Stand: The South and the Agrarian Tradition (New York: ...

Avenues of Faith

This first thorough study of organized mainline churches in a major southern American city during the early 20th century makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the dynamics of urban religion.

Shaping Communities

“ Without Recourse to Owners " : The Architecture of Urban Slavery in the Antebellum South ILRVANIS ROOM 11 : 01L ILIVANTE LOOM PARC ! ONE.

Shaping Communities

Ed: SUNY, Buffalo, Revised papers from two conferences, 1992 and 1993.