The Vanishing Face of Gaia

His Gaia theory provides insight into climate change in the coming century.This is his final warning.

The Vanishing Face of Gaia

James Lovelock described his previous book, The Revenge of Gaia, as 'a wake-up call for humanity'. Stark though it was in many respects, in The Vanishing Face of Gaia Lovelock says that even though the weather seems cooler and pollution lessens as the recession bites, the environmental problems we will face in the twenty-first century are even more terrifying than he previously realised. The Arctic and Antarctic ice-caps are melting very quickly, and water shortages and natural disasters are more common occurrences than at any time in recent history. The civilisations of many countries will be jeopardised and life as we know it severely disrupted. Almost all predictions of the likely rate of climate change have been based on estimates which professional observers in the real worldnow show are consistently underestimating the true rate of change. As a global community we continue to be fixated by conventional 'green' ideas which we believe will help save our world. Lovelock argues that only Gaia theory, which he originated over forty years ago, can really help us understand the crisis fully. The root problem is that there are too many people and animals for the Earth to carry. And there is in fact only one possible procedure which might bring a permanent cure for climate change, but we are unlikely to adopt it. 'Our wish to continue business as usual will probably prevent us from saving ourselves' says Lovelock, so we must adapt as best we can and try to ensure that enough of us survive to allow a more capable species to evolve from us. There could hardly be a more important message for humankind. James Lovelock has been an active and accurate observer of the Earth environment since the 1960s and was the first to find CFCs and other gases accumulating in the air. His Gaia theory provides insight into climate change in the coming century.This is his final warning.

We Belong to Gaia

Their words have endured through the decades, becoming the classics of a movement. Together, these books show the richness of environmental thought, and point the way to a fairer, saner, greener world.

We Belong to Gaia

In twenty short books, Penguin brings you the classics of the environmental movement. James Lovelock's We Belong to Gaia draws on decades of wisdom to lay out the history of our remarkable planet, to show that it is not ours to be exploited - and warns us that it is fighting back. Over the past 75 years, a new canon has emerged. As life on Earth has become irrevocably altered by humans, visionary thinkers around the world have raised their voices to defend the planet, and affirm our place at the heart of its restoration. Their words have endured through the decades, becoming the classics of a movement. Together, these books show the richness of environmental thought, and point the way to a fairer, saner, greener world.

A Rough Ride to the Future

The great scientific visionary of our age presents a radical vision of humanity’s future as the thinking brain of our Earth-system. A Rough Ride to the Future introduces two new Lovelockian ideas.

A Rough Ride to the Future

A Rough Ride to the Future introduces two new Lovelock­ian ideas. The first is that three hundred years ago, when Thomas Newcomen invented the steam engine, he was un­knowingly beginning what Lovelock calls “accelerated evolu­tion,” a process that is bringing about change on our planet roughly a million times faster than Darwinian evolution. The second is that as part of this process, humanity has the capacity to become the intelligent part of Gaia, the self-regulating earth system whose discovery Lovelock first an­nounced nearly fifty years ago. A Rough Ride to the Future is also an intellectual autobiography, in which Lovelock reflects on his life as a lone scientist, and asks—eloquently—whether his career trajec­tory is possible in an age of increased bureaucratization. We are now changing the atmosphere again, and Lovelock argues that there is little that can be done about this. But instead of feeling guilty, we should recognize what is happening, prepare for change, and ensure that we survive as a species so we can contribute to—perhaps even guide—the next evolution of Gaia. The road will be rough, but if we are smart enough, life will continue on earth in some form far into the future.

The Revenge of Gaia

This short book, written at the age of eighty-six after a lifetime engaged in the science of the earth, is his testament.

The Revenge of Gaia

For millennia, humankind has exploited the Earth without counting the cost. Now, as the world warms and weather patterns dramatically change, the Earth is beginning to fight back. James Lovelock, one of the giants of environmental thinking, argues passionately and poetically that, although global warming is now inevitable, we are not yet too late to save at least part of human civilization. This short book, written at the age of eighty-six after a lifetime engaged in the science of the earth, is his testament.

Novacene

A new age—the Novacene—has already begun. In the Novacene, new beings will emerge from existing artificial intelligence systems. They will think 10,000 times faster than we do and they will regard us as we now regard plants.

Novacene

A fascinating new study from the originator of the Gaia Theory, “who conceived the first wholly new way of looking at life on earth since Charles Darwin” (Independent) One of the world’s leading scientific thinkers offers a vision of a future epoch in which humans and artificial intelligence unite to save the Earth James Lovelock, creator of the Gaia hypothesis and the greatest environmental thinker of our time, has produced an astounding new theory about future of life on Earth. He argues that the Anthropocene—the age in which humans acquired planetary-scale technologies—is, after 300 years, coming to an end. A new age—the Novacene—has already begun. In the Novacene, new beings will emerge from existing artificial intelligence systems. They will think 10,000 times faster than we do and they will regard us as we now regard plants. But this will not be the cruel, violent machine takeover of the planet imagined by science fiction. These hyperintelligent beings will be as dependent on the health of the planet as we are. They will need the planetary cooling system of Gaia to defend them from the increasing heat of the sun as much as we do. And Gaia depends on organic life. We will be partners in this project. It is crucial, Lovelock argues, that the intelligence of Earth survives and prospers. He does not think there are intelligent aliens, so we are the only beings capable of understanding the cosmos. Perhaps, he speculates, the Novacene could even be the beginning of a process that will finally lead to intelligence suffusing the entire cosmos. At the age of 100, James Lovelock has produced the most important and compelling work of his life.

On the Destiny of Species

The Vanishing Face of Gaia (2009 Hardback), page 103. 245 James Lovelock. The Vanishing Face of Gaia (2009 Hardback), page 49. 246 James Lovelock. The Vanishing Face of Gaia (2009 Hardback), page 151. 247 James Lovelock. Gaia Series.

On the Destiny of Species

Have you really accepted natural selection?For those who believe in conservation, On the Destiny of Species will not make comfortable reading. In fact, it will challenge you throughout because Life just isn’t as fragile as we have been led to believe.Yes, giant pandas are fragile, and yes, polar bears are fragile (relatively), and yes, even humans may be fragile, but Life isn’t about species; it’s about Life. It’s about pragmatic survival in a dynamic world.Conservation is a hot topic these days – Greenpeace, Friends of the Earth and the WWF have 10 million members between them – but after 30 years of research, the author has no doubt that Nature’s culling policy is ruthless for a reason, and that human emotion is at best misplaced and often specifically detrimental (as the domestic species clearly demonstrate).Published on the 150th anniversary of On the Origin of Species.

Homage to Gaia

A new edition of the celebrated thinker James Lovelock's autobiography to celebrate his 100th birthday.

Homage to Gaia

A new edition in the year of James Lovelock's 100th birthdayWith over fifty patents to his name and innumerable awards and accolades, James Lovelock is a distinguished and original thinker who has been widely recognized by the international scientific community. In this inspiring book, republished in the year of his 100th birthday, Lovelock tells his life story, from his first steps as a scientist to his work with organisations as diverse as NASA, Shell and the Marine Biological Association. Homage to Gaia describes the years of travel and work that led to his crucial scientific breakthroughs in environmental awareness, uncovering how CFCs impact on the ozone layer and creating the concept of Gaia, the theory that the Earth is a self-regulating system. Written in a sharp and energetic style, James Lovelock's book will entertain and inspire anyone interested in science or the creative spirit.

Sounding the Limits of Life

In 2010s The Vanishing Face of Gaia: A Final Warning, James Lovelock—who envisioned Earth as the self-regulating “Gaia” after imagining how it would appear spectrographically from space—argued that global warming is shifting Earth into ...

Sounding the Limits of Life

What is life? What is water? What is sound? In Sounding the Limits of Life, anthropologist Stefan Helmreich investigates how contemporary scientists—biologists, oceanographers, and audio engineers—are redefining these crucial concepts. Life, water, and sound are phenomena at once empirical and abstract, material and formal, scientific and social. In the age of synthetic biology, rising sea levels, and new technologies of listening, these phenomena stretch toward their conceptual snapping points, breaching the boundaries between the natural, cultural, and virtual. Through examinations of the computational life sciences, marine biology, astrobiology, acoustics, and more, Helmreich follows scientists to the limits of these categories. Along the way, he offers critical accounts of such other-than-human entities as digital life forms, microbes, coral reefs, whales, seawater, extraterrestrials, tsunamis, seashells, and bionic cochlea. He develops a new notion of "sounding"—as investigating, fathoming, listening—to describe the form of inquiry appropriate for tracking meanings and practices of the biological, aquatic, and sonic in a time of global change and climate crisis. Sounding the Limits of Life shows that life, water, and sound no longer mean what they once did, and that what count as their essential natures are under dynamic revision.

Gaia

Gaia: A New Look At Life on Earth may continue to divide opinion, but nobody can deny that the book offers a powerful insight into the creative thinking of its author, James E. Lovelock.

Gaia

Gaia: A New Look At Life on Earth may continue to divide opinion, but nobody can deny that the book offers a powerful insight into the creative thinking of its author, James E. Lovelock. Published in 1979, Gaia offered a radically new hypothesis: the Earth, Lovelock argued, is a living entity. Together, the planet and all its separate living organisms form a single self-regulating body, sustaining life and helping it evolve through time. Lovelock sees humans as no more special than other elements of the planet, railing against the once widely-held belief that the good of mankind is the only thing that matters. Despite being seen as radical, and even idiotic on its publication, a version of Lovelock’s viewpoint has found resonance in contemporary debates about the environment and climate, and has now broadly come to be accepted by modern thinkers. As man’s effects on the climate become increasingly extreme, more and more elements of the Earth’s self-regulation seem to be unveiled – forcing scientists to ask how far the planet might be able to go in order self-regulate effectively. Indeed, despite its far-fetched elements, Lovelock’s Gaia thesis seems to ring more convincingly today than ever before; that it does is largely a result of the critical thinking skills that allowed Lovelock to produce novel explanations for existing evidence and, above all, to connect existing fragments of evidence together in new ways.

From Being to Doing

In this book, they explore the limits of our cognitive powers, discuss the truth in perception, the biology of love, and give, all in all, an introduction to systemic thinking that is down to earth, imaginative, and rich in anecdote.

From Being to Doing

At the beginning of the last century, physicists revolutionised the scientific view of the world. Today biologists are radically transforming our understanding of the processes of life and cognition. Probing the mysteries of the mind, they have been able to prove that, in the act of knowing, the observer and the observed, subject and object, are inextricably enmeshed. The world we live in is not independent from us; we literally bring it forth ourselves. One of the protagonists of this new kind of thinking is the internationally renowned neurobiologist and systems theorist Humberto R. Maturana who was interviewed for several weeks by Bernhard Poerksen, journalist, and communication scientist. In this book, they explore the limits of our cognitive powers, discuss the truth in perception, the biology of love, and give, all in all, an introduction to systemic thinking that is down to earth, imaginative, and rich in anecdote.

Requiem for a Species

40 James Lovelock, The Ages of Gaia: A biography of our living Earth, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1989; James Lovelock, The Revenge of Gaia, Penguin, London, 2007; James Lovelock, The Vanishing Face of Gaia, Allen Lane, Camberwell, ...

Requiem for a Species

First Published in 2010. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Darwin s Walk and The Last Wave

29. Lovelock, The Vanishing Face, 156-157. 30. See Robert B. Semple Jr., “Concealed Weapons Against the Environment,” The New York Times, July 31, 2011, SR10. See also Krooth, Gaia, Chapters 29, 30, 31. And see Bill McKibben, Eaarth, ...

Darwin s Walk and The Last Wave

This book describes the reasons humankind may be facing its last moments on Planet Earth. The author follows the trajectory of the evolution of humans and how it has had a widespread effect on Earth’s environment. The book concludes with a look into what the future may hold for humans.

Physical Chemistry

In The Vanishing Face of Gaia published in 2009 Lovelock wrote: "The evidence that the Earth behaves like a living system is now strong. It can either resist climate change or enhance it, and unless we take this into account we can ...

Physical Chemistry

The advancements in society are intertwined with the advancements in science. To understand how changes in society occurred, and will continue to change, one has to have a basic understanding of the laws of physics and chemistry. Physical Chemistry: Multidisciplinary Applications in Society examines how the laws of physics and chemistry (physical chemistry) explain the dynamic nature of the Universe and events on Earth, and how these events affect the evolution of society (multidisciplinary applications). The ordering of the chapters reflects the natural flow of events in an evolving Universe: Philosophy of Science, the basis of the view that natural events have natural causes - Cosmology, the origin of everything from the Big Bang to the current state of the Universe - Geoscience, the physics and chemistry behind the evolution of the planet Earth from its birth to the present - Life Science, the molecules and mechanisms of life on Earth - Ecology, the interdependence of all components within the Ecosphere and the Universe - Information Content, emphasis on how words and phrases and framing of issues affect opinions, reliability of sources, and the limitations of knowledge. Addresses the four Ws of science: Why scientists believe Nature works the way it does, Who helped develop the fields of science, What theories of natural processes tell us about the nature of Nature, and Where our scientific knowledge is taking us into the future Gives a historical review of the evolution of science, and the accompanying changes in the philosophy of how science views the nature of the Universe Explores the physics and chemistry of Nature with minimal reliance on mathematics Examines the structure and dynamics of the Universe and our Home Planet Earth Provides a detailed analysis of how humans, as members of the Ecosphere, have influenced, and are continuing to influence, the dynamics of events on the paludarium called Earth Presents underlying science of current political issues that shape the future of humankind Emphasizes how words and phrases and framing of issues can influence the opinions of members of society Makes extensive use of metaphors and everyday experiences to illustrate principles in science and social interactions

No Other Planet

In The Vanishing Face of Gaia, his final discussion of the Gaia motif (up until today), Lovelock strikes a similarly apocalyptic tone, prophesying that increasing temperatures will render the demise of vast swathes of the human ...

No Other Planet

Investigates the role of hope and fear in our climate-changed world by focusing on various expressions of the utopian imagination.

Beyond Mechanism

41. James Lovelock, The Vanishing Face of Gaia.' A Final Warning (New York: Basic Books, 2009), 179. 42. Dawkins, The Extended Phenotype, 236. 43. Dawkins, The Extended Phenotype, 236. 44. David M. Wilkinson, “Homeostatic Gaia: An ...

Beyond Mechanism

Pairing scientists and philosophers together, this book is an exploration of some of the new frontiers in biology (e.g., Emergence, Complex Systems, Biosemiotics, Symbiogenesis, Organic Selection, Epigenetics, Niche Construction, Teleodynamics, etc.). The chapters in this volume challenge the mechanistic metaphysic that is implicit in the reigning neo-Darwinist paradigm, point to more inclusive modes of thinking in relation to the nature of life, and contribute to the novel synthesis that is presently “in the air.”

Dreams of Other Worlds

The Vanishing Face of Gaia: A Final Warning by J. E. Lovelock (2009), New York: Basic Books, p. 163. 62. James Lovelock: In Search of Gaia, by J. Gribbin and M. Gribbin (2009), Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, p. 143.

Dreams of Other Worlds

The story of unmanned space exploration, from Viking to today Dreams of Other Worlds describes the unmanned space missions that have opened new windows on distant worlds. Spanning four decades of dramatic advances in astronomy and planetary science, this book tells the story of eleven iconic exploratory missions and how they have fundamentally transformed our scientific and cultural perspectives on the universe and our place in it. The journey begins with the Viking and Mars Exploration Rover missions to Mars, which paint a startling picture of a planet at the cusp of habitability. It then moves into the realm of the gas giants with the Voyager probes and Cassini's ongoing exploration of the moons of Saturn. The Stardust probe's dramatic round-trip encounter with a comet is brought vividly to life, as are the SOHO and Hipparcos missions to study the Sun and Milky Way. This stunningly illustrated book also explores how our view of the universe has been brought into sharp focus by NASA's great observatories—Spitzer, Chandra, and Hubble—and how the WMAP mission has provided rare glimpses of the dawn of creation. Dreams of Other Worlds reveals how these unmanned exploratory missions have redefined what it means to be the temporary tenants of a small planet in a vast cosmos.

The Future of the World s Climate

Lovelock, J. E. (2006), The Revenge of Gaia: Why the Earth is Fighting Back e And How We Can Still Save Humanity, Allen Lane, London, Santa Barbara, California, Allen Lane. Lovelock, J. E. (2009), The Vanishing Face of Gaia: A Final ...

The Future of the World s Climate

The study of climate today seems to be dominated by global warming, but these predictions of climatic models must be placed in their geological, paleo-climatic, and astronomical context to create a complete picture of the Earth's future climate. The Future of the World's Climate presents that perspective with data and projections that have emerged from more technologically advanced and accurate climate modeling. The book is comprised of 18 new and revised chapters that feature reviews of current climate science. The authors are drawn from all over the world and from the highest regarded peer-reviewed groups. Each chapter has undergone major revisions and new content has been added throughout. Authored by the world's leading climate scientists, most of whom are also contributing authors to the IPCC Assessment Reports. More than 200 tables, diagrams, illustrations, and photographs Climate modeling technology is more advanced and precise than it was 15 years ago-a major implication featured in this new edition.

Green Light

Lovelock is best known for the Gaia hypothesis, which posits that ecological relationships and feedback loops make Earth's ... 19 Three years after publication of The Revenge of Gaia, Lovelock issued The Vanishing Face of Gaia.

Green Light

How humans' aesthetic perceptions have shaped other life forms, from racehorses to ornamental plants. Humans have bred plants and animals with an eye to aesthetics for centuries: flowers are selected for colorful blossoms or luxuriant foliage; racehorses are prized for the elegance of their frames. Hybridized plants were first exhibited as fine art in 1936, when the Museum of Modern Art in New York showed Edward Steichen's hybrid delphiniums. Since then, bio art has become a genre; artists work with a variety of living things, including plants, animals, bacteria, slime molds, and fungi. Many commentators have addressed the social and political concerns raised by making art out of living material. In Green Light, however, George Gessert examines the role that aesthetic perception has played in bio art and other interventions in evolution. Gessert looks at a variety of life forms that humans have helped shape, focusing on plants—the most widely domesticated form of life and the one that has been crucial to his own work as an artist. We learn about pleasure gardens of the Aztecs, cultivated for intoxicating fragrance; the aesthetic standards promoted by national plant societies; a daffodil that looks like a rose; and praise for weeds and wildflowers.

Der Systemblick auf Innovation

In: PNAS 105(6), S. 1786-1793 Lovelock, J. (2009): The Vanishing Face of Gaia: A Final Warning. New York Luhmann, N. (1983): Anspruchsinflation im Krankheitssystem. Eine Stellungnahme aus gesellschaftstheoretischer Sicht.

Der Systemblick auf Innovation


The Crises of Civilization

84 Lovelock, The Vanishing Face of Gaia, pp. 35–6. 85 Lovelock, The Vanishing Face of Gaia, p. 36. 86 Sunstein, Risk and Reason, pp. 33–4 and Lovelock, Vanishing Face of Gaia, p. 80. 87 Pierrehumbert, Principles of Planetary Climate, p.

The Crises of Civilization

The world created by the legacies of empire and colonialism now confronts some deep crises of civility, precipitated by globalization and climate change. In this volume, Dipesh Chakrabarty examines these distinct—but interrelated—issues side by side. Varied ideas of civilization and humanism have shaped notions of a global humanity in the lingering twilight of the European empires. Detailing these ideas, in the section titled ‘Global Worlds’, Chakrabarty outlines the conflicts and connections that arise from global encounters in our postcolonial age. The second section, ‘The Planetary Human’, on the other hand, explores the significance of planetary climate change for humanistic and postcolonial thought. Chakrabarty argues that such change demands not only critiques of capitalism and inequality, but also new thinking about the human species as a whole—our patterns of justice, writing of history, and relationship with nature in the age of the Anthropocene. The global is human-centric in construction; the planetary involves many other actors and thus includes the thorny question of how we go beyond the anthropocentric to discuss and conceptualize the agency of the non-human.