Vimy

The Vimy Expeditions : the Flying Machine that Moved Humanity

Vimy

During World War I, Vickers Ltd., one of the world's largest armament manufacturers, fulfilled orders for an open- cockpit three-seater bi-plane from the company's Brooklands factory. Flying for the first time in 1917, the F.B.27, or Vickers Vimy, met the British Air Board's need for a heavy multi-engine bomber. Following the Armistice of 1918, only 235 Vimys were built, with the first examples flying to Egypt to be used as bombers and transports. Relegated to peacetime use, Vimys converted for commercial operations achieved a non-stop flight from Canada to Ireland in 1919, piloted by John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown, closely followed by Australians Ross and Keith Smith flying from England to Adelaide. Pierre van Ryneveld and Christopher Quintin Brand later competed with a Vimy in the 1920 Daily Mail Race for the Cape, an event they were unable to complete in their original aircraft. Reliving the adventures of these aviation pioneers, a team of risk-takers re-creates their journeys to Australia, South Africa and across the Atlantic in the Vimy's open cockpit. The specially built Vimy suffered engine failure over Sumatra and dodged wildlife and potholes in northern Kenya. Her adventurous crew, wilted in soaring Saharan temperatures, and nearly froze over the Atlantic. Peter McMillan's book records all three voyages, reliving the thrills, hazards, and successes of those pioneering moments. Interwoven with stories of the early 20th century expeditions and backed by stunning photography, VIMY: The Vimy Expeditions provides a glorious tribute to that mammoth bi-plane from a bygone era.

The Vimy Trap

or, How We Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Great War

The Vimy Trap

The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”— today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades. Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a powerful probe of commemoration cultures. This subtle, fast-paced work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

Vimy

The Battle and the Legend

Vimy

#1 NATIONAL BESTSELLER Longlisted for British Columbia's National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction 2018 A bold new telling of the defining battle of the Great War, and how it came to signify and solidify Canada’s national identity Why does Vimy matter? How did a four-day battle at the midpoint of the Great War, a clash that had little strategic impact on the larger Allied war effort, become elevated to a national symbol of Canadian identity? Tim Cook, Canada’s foremost military historian and a Charles Taylor Prize winner, examines the Battle of Vimy Ridge and the way the memory of it has evolved over 100 years. The operation that began April 9, 1917, was the first time the four divisions of the Canadian Corps fought together. More than 10,000 Canadian soldiers were killed or injured over four days—twice the casualty rate of the Dieppe Raid in August 1942. The Corps’ victory solidified its reputation among allies and opponents as an elite fighting force. In the wars’ aftermath, Vimy was chosen as the site for the country’s strikingly beautiful monument to mark Canadian sacrifice and service. Over time, the legend of Vimy took on new meaning, with some calling it the “birth of the nation.” The remarkable story of Vimy is a layered skein of facts, myths, wishful thinking, and conflicting narratives. Award-winning writer Tim Cook explores why the battle continues to resonate with Canadians a century later. He has uncovered fresh material and photographs from official archives and private collections across Canada and from around the world. On the 100th anniversary of the event, and as Canada celebrates 150 years as a country, Vimy is a fitting tribute to those who fought the country’s defining battle. It is also a stirring account of Canadian identity and memory, told by a masterful storyteller.

Vimy Ridge

A Canadian Reassessment

Vimy Ridge

On the morning of April 9, 1917, troops of the Canadian Corps under General Julian Byng attacked the formidable German defences of Vimy Ridge. Since then, generations of Canadians have shared a deep emotional attachment to the battle, inspired partly by the spectacular memorial on the battlefield. Although the event is considered central in Canadian military history, most people know very little about what happened during that memorable Easter in northern France. Vimy Ridge: A Canadian Reassessment draws on the work of a new generation of scholars who explore the battle from three perspectives. The first assesses the Canadian Corps within the wider context of the Western Front in 1917. The second explores Canadian leadership, training, and preparations and details the story of each of the four Canadian divisions. The final section concentrates on the commemoration of Vimy Ridge, both for contemporaries and later generations of Canadians. This long-overdue collection, based on original research, replaces mythology with new perspectives, new details, and a new understanding of the men who fought and died for the remarkable achievement that was the Battle of Vimy Ridge. Co-published with the Laurier Centre for Military, Strategic and Disarmament Studies

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: April 7-July 27, 1805

The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: April 7-July 27, 1805

When the Atlas of the Lewis and Clark Expedition appeared in 1983 critics hailed it as a publishing landmark in western history. Fully living up to the promise of the first volume were the second volume, which began the actual journals and brought the expedition through its first year to August 1804, and the third volume, which brought the explorers through a winter at Fort Mandan, present North Dakota, and to April 1805. This eagerly awaited fourth volume begins on April 7, 1805, when Meriwether Lewis and William Clark and their permanent party set out from Fort Mandan, traveling up-river along the banks of the Missouri. For the first time they entered country never explored by whites. With the help of the Shoshone Indian woman Sacagawea, they hoped to make friendly contact with her people, then cross the Rocky Mountains and eventually reach the Pacific. They were to spend the rest of the spring and the early summer toiling up the Missouri, or around its perilous falls. Along the way, they encountered grizzly bears, cataloged new species of plants and animals, and mapped rivers and streams. Sacagawea recognized landmarks; meeting her people became the next great concern of the expedition when they reached the three forks of the Missouri in late July. Superseding the last edition, published early in this century, the current edition contains new materials discovered since then. It expands and updates the annotation to take account of the most recent scholarship on the many subject touched on by the journals.

Byng of Vimy

General and Governor General

Byng of Vimy

Field Marshal the Viscount Byng of Vimy did not fit into the conventional mould in the Army, as Governor-General of Canada or as Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police. Few officers commanded more widespread affection from their troops, or knew them and treated them with such respect as he did. Beginning with dramatic reforms in dress and living conditions in his own regiment, the 10th Royal Hussars, Byng consistently watched over the welfare of his men. Following the desperate Ypres battles of 1914-15, he was sent to Gallipoli to revive a failing enterprise, but instead, in the face of Kitchener's and Churchill's opposition, he called for it to be abandoned. He then planned one of the most successful withdrawals in the history of war. Ever seeking ways to win, Byng led the Canadian Corps to the capture of Vimy Ridge, and the Third Army in the first major tank battle at Cambrai, and in 1918 he commanded the largest of Britain's field armies in the final victory campaign. As Governor-General of Canada, he became almost a Canadian nationalist and worked for the unity of the widespread provinces. He advocated the adoption of a Canadian flag and abandonment of the word "Empire". His conception of the role of the Crown in the constitutional crisis of 1926 has led to its position in the Commonwealth today. Finally, at the age of 66 and fighting a wasting illness, he was summoned to reform the Metropolitan Police, which in a remarkably short time he brought into the 20th century. This reissued biography won the Governor-General's Prize in Canada when it was first published.

Canada's World Wonders

Canada's World Wonders

Take a journey across Canada to visit our world-renowned natural and historic landmarks. With Canada's World Wonders, you'll visit Banff National Park, the first link in a vast network of natural parks and heritage sites that has grown to include Old Quebec, the Rideau Canal, and the Fortress of Louisbourg. UNESCO World Heritage Sites, such as Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump in Alberta and the Gwaii Haanas totems in British Columbia, as well as such Indigenous cultural sites including the locations of ancient inuksuit, are also part of the journey. You'll travel through the world’s longest and deepest railway tunnel, cruise the Trans-Canada Highway, explore the Grosse Îsle and Pier 21 immigration memorials, tour the graves of the failed Franklin Expedition, and visit the Vimy Ridge War Memorial, all with Ron Brown’s engaging historical commentary.

Making Public Pasts

The Contested Terrain of Montreal's Public Memories, 1891-1930

Making Public Pasts

Gordon shows that while individual memory is crucial to establishing and maintaining identity, public memory is contested terrain - official customs and traditions, monuments, historic sites, and the celebration of anniversaries and festivals serve to order individual and collective perceptions of the past. Public memory is therefore the product of competitions and ideas about the past that are fashioned in a public sphere and speak primarily about structures of power. It conscripts historical events in a bid to guide shared memories into a coherent narrative that helps individuals negotiate their place in broader collective identities. The contest over public memories involves an exclusiveness that packages "others" according to the ideological preferences of the dominant cultures. Gordon shows that in Montreal ethnic, class, and gender voices strove to stake their own claims to legitimacy. Rather than acknowledging a single past, Montreal's many publics made and celebrated many public memories.