Aristotle and the Virtues

Howard J. Curzer presents a fresh new reading of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, which brings each of the virtues alive.

Aristotle and the Virtues

Howard J. Curzer presents a fresh new reading of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, which brings each of the virtues alive. He argues that justice and friendship are symbiotic in Aristotle's view; reveals how virtue ethics is not only about being good, but about becoming good; and describes Aristotle's ultimate quest to determine happiness.

The Virtues of Aristotle

(NE1144a29¥b1; see also EE127b34¥1228a2 and for the metaphor of perception NE1143b11¥14) So Aristotle has two reasons to believe that ethics is not primarily ... This book is a study of Aristotle«s doctrine of the virtues of character.

The Virtues of Aristotle

Originally published in 1986. Both moral philosophers and philosophical psychologists need to answer the question ‘what is a virtue?’ and the best answer so far give is that of Aristotle. This book is a rigorous exposition of that answer. The elements of Aristotle’s doctrine of virtue are scattered throughout his writings; this book reconstructs his complex and comprehensive doctrine in one place. It also covers Aristotle’s views about choice, character, emotions and the role of pleasure and pain in virtue. The celebrated function (ergon) is considered carefully as well as the doctrine of virtue being related to Aristotle’s metaphysics and categories.

Understanding Aristotle The Virtues

Understanding Aristotle: The Virtues Hercules Bantas A Reluctant Geek Academic Guide Published by The Reluctant Geek Melbourne, Australia Copyright Hercules Bantas 2011 Author's Notes This guide examines the virtues in Aristotle's moral ...

Understanding Aristotle  The Virtues

This essay length guide covers Book 2 of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics in which he discusses the virtues. It explains the difference between moral and intellectual virtues, what Aristotle means by 'happiness', what he considers vices, and his 'doctrine of the mean'.

Translations from the Greek viz Aristotle s Synopsis of the virtues and vices The Similitudes of Demophilus The Golden sentences of Democrates and the Pythagoric symbols with the explanations of Iamblichus By W Bridgman To which are added the Pythagoric sentences of Demophilus by Mr Thomas Taylor

DEFINITIONS OF THE VIRTUES . Prudence is the virtue of the rational part of the soul , affording those things which contribute to felicity . Mildness is the virtue of the irascible part of the soul , according to which men . are ...

Translations from the Greek  viz  Aristotle s Synopsis of the virtues and vices  The Similitudes of Demophilus  The Golden sentences of Democrates  and the Pythagoric symbols  with the explanations of Iamblichus  By W  Bridgman     To which are added the Pythagoric sentences of Demophilus by Mr  Thomas Taylor


The Virtues of Vengeance

ficult passage , In chapter 4 Aristotle makes an interesting point , in what Broadie calls “ a dif, " 8 that again may confuse the issue of whether his conception of virtue ethics is agent - based or agent - focused .

The Virtues of Vengeance

"In the course of his study of vengeance as a moral concept, French exposes important distinctions between types of moral theories (karmic and non-karmic) and between people who are morally handicapped and those who are morally challenged. He examines concepts relevant to vengeance, such as honor, moral authority, and evil, and issues such as the rationality of revenge and proportionality in punishment."--BOOK JACKET.

Aristotle and the Virtues

Working through the Nicomachean Ethics virtue-by-virtue, explaining and generally defending Aristotle's claims, this book brings each of Aristotle's virtues alive.

Aristotle and the Virtues

Aristotle is the father of virtue ethics--a discipline which is receiving renewed scholarly attention. Yet Aristotle's accounts of the individual virtues remain opaque, for most contemporary commentators of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics have focused upon other matters. In contrast, Howard J. Curzer takes Aristotle's detailed description of the individual virtues to be central to his ethical theory. Working through the Nicomachean Ethics virtue-by-virtue, explaining and generally defending Aristotle's claims, this book brings each of Aristotle's virtues alive. A new Aristotle emerges, an Aristotle fascinated by the details of the individual virtues. Justice and friendship hold special places in Aristotle's virtue theory. Many contemporary discussions place justice and friendship at opposite, perhaps even conflicting, poles of a spectrum. Justice seems to be very much a public, impartial, and dispassionate thing, while friendship is paradigmatically private, partial, and passionate. Yet Curzer argues that in Aristotle's view they are actually symbiotic. Justice is defined in terms of friendship, and good friendship is defined in terms of justice. Curzer goes on to reveal how virtue ethics is not only about being good; it is also about becoming good. Aristotle and the Virtues reconstructs Aristotle's account of moral development. Certain character types serve as stages of moral development. Certain catalysts and mechanisms lead from one stage to the next. Explaining why some people cannot make moral progress specifies the preconditions of moral development. Finally, Curzer describes Aristotle's quest to determine the ultimate goal of moral development, happiness.

Practical Intelligence and the Virtues

subordinate to the four virtues a rather diverse list of othe oul in us ell 005a, chs. , 7. By contrast, Aristotle himself seems strikingly modern in his casual approach to finding new virtues without the hierarchical organization of a ...

Practical Intelligence and the Virtues

One of the most important developments in modern moral philosophy is the resurgence of interest in the virtues. In this new book, Daniel Russell explores two important hopes for such an approach to moral thought: that starting from the virtues should cast light on what makes an action right, and that notions like character, virtue, and vice should yield a plausible picture of human psychology. Russell argues that the key to each of these hopes is an understanding of the cognitive and deliberative skills involved in the virtues. If right action is defined in terms of acting generously or kindly, then these virtues must involve skills for determining what the kind or generous thing to do would be on a given occasion. Likewise, Russell argues that understanding virtuous action as the intelligent pursuit of virtuous goals yields a promising picture of the psychology of virtue. This book develops an Aristotelian account of the virtue of practical intelligence or 'phronesis'—an excellence of deliberating and making choices—which Russell argues is a necessary part of every virtue. This emphasis on the roots of the virtues in the practical intellect contrasts with ambivalence about the practical intellect in much recent work on the virtues—a trend Russell argues is ultimately perilous for virtue theory. This book also takes a penetrating look at issues like the unity of the virtues, responsibility for character, and that elusive figure, 'the virtuous person'. Written in a clear and careful manner, Practical Intelligence and the Virtues will appeal to philosophers and students alike in moral philosophy and moral psychology.

The Virtues of Freedom

Kant and Virtue Ethics “Virtue ethics” as it is currently understood was not on Kant's docket, nor was Aristotle, with whom contemporary virtue ethics is most closely associated, a major figure in Kant's historiography of moral ...

The Virtues of Freedom

The essays collected in this volume by Paul Guyer, one of the world's foremost Kant scholars, explore Kant's attempt to develop a morality grounded on the intrinsic and unconditional value of the human freedom to set our own ends. When regulated by the principle that the freedom of all is equally valuable, the freedom to set our own ends -- what Kant calls "humanity" - becomes what he calls autonomy. These essays explore Kant's strategies for establishing the premise that freedom is the inner worth of the world or the essential end of humankind, as he says, and for deriving the specific duties that fundamental principle of morality generates in the empirical circumstances of human existence. The Virtues of Freedom further investigates Kant's attempts to prove that we are always free to live up to this moral ideal, that is, that we have free will no matter what, as well as his more successful explorations of the ways in which our natural tendencies to be moral -- dispositions to the feeling of respect and more specific feelings such as love and self-esteem -- can and must be cultivated and educated. Guyer finally examines the various models of human community that Kant develops from his premise that our associations must be based on the value of freedom for all. The contrasts but also similarities of Kant's moral philosophy to that of David Hume but many of his other predecessors and contemporaries, such as Stoics and Epicureans, Pufendorf and Wolff, Hutcheson, Kames, and Smith, are also explored.

How Should One Live

This collection is the first general survey of this revival, containing specially commissioned articles on topics central to virtue ethics and virtue theory, written by a distinguished international team of philosophers.

How Should One Live

The last four decades have seen a remarkable revival of interest in the virtues, which lay at the heart of ancient and medieval moral philosophy. This collection is the first general survey of this revival, containing specially commissioned articles on topics central to virtue ethics and virtue theory, written by a distinguished international team of philosophers. It represents the state of the art in this subject, and will set the agenda for future work. Topics covered in How Should One Live? include: practical virtue ethics; ancient views of the virtues; impartiality and partiality; Kant and the virtues; utilitarianism and the virtues; the virtues and human nature; natural and artificial virtues; virtue and the good life; the vices; virtue and the emotions; virtue and politics; feminism, moral education, and the virtues; and virtue and community.

Plato and the Virtue of Courage

Indeed , this question also has an ancient lineage and figures prominently in Aristotle's brief but incisive treatment of courage in his Nicomachean Ethics ( henceforth NE ) . Aristotle is famous for arguing that virtuous action is the ...

Plato and the Virtue of Courage

Chief among these is that, by facilitating the pursuit of wisdom, such courage can provide a crucial foundation for the courage most deserving of the name.

Aristotle s Virtues

Citizens , Non - Citizens , and the Virtues Aristotle did not include women , slaves , or manual workers among the citizens . We may find his reasons anachronistic and morally unacceptable but he did offer reasons for the exclusions .

Aristotle s Virtues

Aristotle's Virtues focuses on Aristotle's philosophical method and his conceptions of form and substance as a way to explicate the main elements of his ethical and political theorizing. This book shows how those highly general features of Aristotle's thought have an important bearing on his conception of the best kind of life for a human being and the kind of political community needed to enable and encourage that kind of life. While explicating fundamental aspects of Aristotle's philosophy of nature, metaphysics, and theory of knowledge, the discussion of them leads to a culminating account of the virtues of both individual and political life.

A Christian Education in the Virtues

Aristotle did not consider the specific virtues of the teacher mainly because teaching was not thought of as a proper task for a noble man and had, in ancient Greece, been tainted by association with the infamous sophists as private ...

A Christian Education in the Virtues

A Christian Education in the Virtues examines the connection between human nature and human flourishing. It draws on ancient and medieval sources to explore the formation of the person based on a Christian anthropology, emphasising the communal nature of the virtuous life and provides a richer approach to the question of contemporary character education. The book argues that the only way to understand and construct our character virtues is to have a clear picture of what is the purpose and meaning of human life. It highlights the importance of engaging with moral issues and makes the case that, for Christian educators, human flourishing is inseparable from God’s active relationship to human beings. The book also explores a teleological approach to character education goals. To educate the whole person in the light of an all-embracing Christian worldview is challenged by secular and liberal ideology and is often seen as irrational to the modern mind. Overall, the text seeks to demonstrate that many aspects of a Neo-Aristotelian-Thomist theoretical underpinning for Christian character education holds out a viable option for Christians. It therefore argues the case for the educational potential of Christian character education. This important book will be essential reading for academics, researchers and students in the fields of character and virtue education, religious education and the philosophy of education. The Open Access version of this book, available at www.taylorfrancis.com/books/oa-mono/10.4324/9781003141877, has been made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 4.0 license.

Virtue Ethics and Human Enhancement

This book shows how pressing issues in bioethics – e.g. the ownership of biological material and human cognitive enhancement – successfully can be discussed with in a virtue ethics framework.

Virtue Ethics and Human Enhancement

This book shows how pressing issues in bioethics – e.g. the ownership of biological material and human cognitive enhancement – successfully can be discussed with in a virtue ethics framework. This is not intended as a complete or exegetic account of virtue ethics. Rather, the aim here is to discuss how some key ideas in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, when interpreted pragmatically, can be a productive way to approach some hot issues in bioethics. In spite of being a very promising theoretical perspective virtue ethics has so far been underdeveloped both in bioethics and neuroethics and most discussions have been conducted in consequentialist and/or deontological terms. ​

Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Aristotle on Ethics

The unity of the virtues One final look at a remark of Aristotle's we have already seen will complete the picture : In this way , we can refute the dialectical argument that the [ moral ] virtues are quite separate from one another .

Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Aristotle on Ethics

A clear introduction to Aristotle's Nicomachaean Ethics. Covers Aristotle's life, the background to the text, and Aristotle's continuing key role in philosophy and ethical thought.

The Moral Psychology of the Virtues

We see that Aristotle is not here involved in a vicious circularity in the claims that practical wisdom requires moral virtue and that moral virtue requires practical wisdom . The ' moral virtue ' requisite to come to possess practical ...

The Moral Psychology of the Virtues


Virtue in Business

Focusing on Aristotle's theory that the virtues of character, rather than actions, are central to ethics, Edwin M. Hartman introduces readers of this book to the value of applying Aristotle's virtue approach to business.

Virtue in Business

The virtue approach to business ethics is a topic of increasing importance within the business world. Focusing on Aristotle's theory that the virtues of character, rather than actions, are central to ethics, Edwin Hartman introduces readers of this book to the value of applying Aristotle's virtue approach to business. Using numerous real-world examples, he argues that business leaders have good reason to take character seriously when explaining and evaluating individuals in organisations. He demonstrates how the virtue approach can deepen our understanding of business ethics, and how it can contribute to contemporary discussions of character, rationality, corporate culture, ethics education and global ethics. Written by one of the foremost Aristotelian scholars working in the field today, this authoritative introduction to the role of virtue ethics in business is a valuable primer for graduate students and academic researchers in business ethics, applied ethics and philosophy.

Virtue Ethics in the Middle Ages

The early thirteenth century -- The structure of the soul, intellectual virtues, and the ethical ideal of masters of arts in early commentaries on the Nichomachean ethics / Valeria A. Buffon -- Moral and intellectual virtues in the earliest ...

Virtue Ethics in the Middle Ages

The early thirteenth century -- The structure of the soul, intellectual virtues, and the ethical ideal of masters of arts in early commentaries on the Nichomachean ethics / Valeria A. Buffon -- Moral and intellectual virtues in the earliest Latin commentaries on the Nicomachean ethics / Irene Zavattero -- Virtus in the Naples commentary on the Ethica nova (MS Naples, biblioteca nazionale) / Martin J. Tracey -- Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas in war and peace : the virtue of courage in the writings of Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas / Jorn Muller -- Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas on magnanimity / Tobias Hoffmann -- Aquinas's interpretation of the Aristotelian virtue of justice and his doctrine of natural law / Matthias Perkams -- The late thirteenth century -- Heroic virtue in the commentary tradition on the Nicomachean ethics in the second half of the thirteenth century / Iacopo Costa -- Utrumfelix indigeat amicis : the reception of the Aristotelian theory of friendship at the arts faculty in Paris / Marco Toste -- The thirteenth and fourteenth centuries -- The cardinal virtues in medieval commentaries on the Nicomachean ethics, 1250-1350 / Istvan P. Bejczy -- Political prudence in some medieval commentaries on the sixth book of the Nicomachean ethics / Roberto Lambertini -- The virtue of virginity : the Aristotelian challenge / Pavel Bla -- The fifteenth century -- Teaching ethics at the University of Vienna : the making of a commentary at the faculty of arts (a case study) / Christoph Flueler

Aristotle s First Principles

We began our discussion of the virtues of character by distinguishing eudaimonic virtues—those that promote the agent's self-realization—from moral virtues—those that promote the good of others.1 Aristotle believes that these are not ...

Aristotle s First Principles

Aristotle's reliance on dialectic as a method of philosophy appears to conflict with his metaphysical realist view of his conclusions. This book explores Aristotle's philosophical method and the merits of his conclusions, and shows how he defends dialectic against the objection that it cannot justify a metaphysical realist's claims. The author does not presuppose extensive previous acquaintance with Aristotle. Greek texts are translated, and Greek words transliterated.

Aristotle Emotions and Education

Table 2.1 Aristotelian moral virtues discussed in the Nicomachean Ethics Deficiency Mean Excess Cowardice Bravery Rashness Insensibility Temperance Intemperance Ungenerosity Generosity WastefuIness Niggardliness Magnificence Vulgarity ...

Aristotle  Emotions  and Education

What can Aristotle teach us that is relevant to contemporary moral and educational concerns? What can we learn from him about the nature of moral development, the justifiability and educability of emotions, the possibility of friendship between parents and their children, or the fundamental aims of teaching? The message of this book is that Aristotle has much to teach us about those issues and many others. In a formidable display of boundary-breaking scholarship, drawing upon the domains of philosophy, education and psychology, Kristján Kristjánsson analyses and dispels myriad misconceptions about Aristotle’s views on morality, emotions and education that abound in the current literature – including the claims of the emotional intelligence theorists that they have revitalised Aristotle’s message for the present day. The book proceeds by enlightening and astute forays into areas covered by Aristotle’s canonical works, while simultaneously gauging their pertinence for recent trends in moral education. This is an arresting book on how to balance the demands of head and heart: a book that deepens the contemporary discourse on emotion cultivation and virtuous living and one that will excite any student of moral education, whether academic or practitioner.

Aristotle s Ethics Explained by Question and Answer

X. VIRTUE . Excellence . Do we mean the same thing by virtue as Aristotle meant by noun åpern : moral virtue in the Ethics is excellence of character : " everything has an excel . ence , the horse , the dog , and the flower , and so has ...

Aristotle s Ethics Explained by Question and Answer