The War on Terror and the Laws of War

A Military Perspective

The War on Terror and the Laws of War

Many years after the United States initiated a military response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the nation continues to prosecute an armed conflict against transnational terrorist groups. Today, it remains just as vital to understand how the law of armed conflict applies to and regulates military operations executed within the scope of this armed conflict against transnational non-state terrorist groups. In The War on Terror and the Laws of War, seven legal scholars, each with experience as military officers, focus on how to strike an effective balance between the necessity of using armed violence to subdue a threat to the nation with the humanitarian interest of mitigating the suffering inevitably associated with that use. Each chapter addresses a specific operational issue, including the national right of self-defense, military targeting and the use of drones, detention, interrogation, and trial by military commission of captured terrorist operatives, while illustrating how the law of armed conflict influences resolution of that issue. This Second Edition carries on the critical mission of continuing the ongoing dialogue about the law from an unabashedly military perspective, bringing practical wisdom to the contentious topic of applying international law to the battlefield. Book jacket.

The War on Terrorism and the Terror of God

The War on Terrorism and the Terror of God

Uniquely relevant to a world shaken by recent acts of terror, this provocative analysis of our culture of violence calls people of faith back to the way of peace that has always been the proper Christian response to aggression. With the newspaper in one hand and the Bible in the other, Lee Griffith takes a frank look at the historical events and modern forces that contribute to terrorism. This is not a book about small guerrilla bands of terrorists nor about so-called "Islamic terrorists" -- it is a cogent, open-eyed analysis of a "worldwide epidemic of violence. In a discussion that will no doubt be controversial, Griffith argues that terrorism and counter-terrorism are identical phenomena when viewed at the spiritual level. To oppose terrorism with violence acknowledges the terrorist assumption that meaningful change is only possible through suffering and fear. Likewise, terrorism and counter-terrorism both employ similar God language to justify horrendous acts of violence. This is true not only of "rogue states" but also of Western leaders who use religious language on the eve of battle. In response to today's culture of terror, Griffith points the way to a theology of peace. He first looks at specific current events that contribute to terrorism. Next, he mines the history of the church to see how the tradition has responded to violence in the past. Finally, he probes the biblical texts for meaningful answers. The result is a stirring message for our day: rather than serving as an incitement to violence, the biblical concept of "the terror of God" stands as a renunciation of all violence -- and of death itself. Posing a radical faith for radical times, "The War onTerrorism and the Terror of God is sure to generate discussion from every quarter.

The ‘War on Terror' and the Framework of International Law

The ‘War on Terror' and the Framework of International Law

Analyses the international legal framework governing terrorism and counter-terrorism and assesses the legal issues relating to post-9/11 international practice.

The War on Terror

The War on Terror

The war on terror has been in effect since 2002, when United States troops first invaded Afghanistan. War efforts have expanded from military action to legislation such as the PATRIOT Act and domestic applications. This book examines these issues with statistics, legal opinions, and information about legislation.

Law, Ethics, and the War on Terror

Law, Ethics, and the War on Terror

In recent years the mass murder of thousands of innocent civilians by al Qaeda terrorists has plumbed the depths of criminality and immorality. Yet it is the response to those attacks, particularly by the United States, that has provoked widespread accusations that the anti-terrorist cure may be worse than the terrorist disease. This book explores the key legal and ethical controversies that arose in the wake of the brutal attacks of 11 September 2001. After the Cold War, progress in human rights and limitations on warfare created an impression that "global civil society" had emerged to challenge the dominance of states and establish new norms to guide their behavior. The events of 9/11, however, witnessed a reassertion of state prerogatives, reflected in challenges to the Geneva Conventions and the stigma against torture. Focusing on core debates about preventive war and the implications of targeted assassination, kidnapping, indefinite detention, and the torture of suspected terrorists, Evangelista asks whether state practice will further undermine the very norms of international law and morality, or whether efforts to combat terrorism can be brought back into conformity with ethical and legal standards.

Philosophy 9/11

Thinking about the War on Terrorism

Philosophy 9/11

Fifteen philosophers turn their thoughts to international terrorism and the war that it has spawned, lending their expertise in law, ethics, politics, feminism, and aesthetics to a wide range of issues, from just war theory to the question of how to define terrorism. Original.

A War on Terror?

The European Stance on a New Threat, Changing Laws and Human Rights Implications

A War on Terror?

Marianne Wade and Almir Maljevi? Although the worries about terrorism paled in comparison to the economic crisis as a topic during the last US election, one can find plenty of grounds to assume that they remain issue number one in the minds of politicians in Europe. As the German houses of Parliament prepare to call in the mediation committee in the discussion of legislation which would provide the Federal Police – thus far mandated purely with the post-facto investigation of crime – with powers to act to prevent acts of terrorism, Spain’s struggle with ETA and the British Government licks its wounds after a resounding defeat of its latest anti-terrorist proposals by the House of Lords, one cannot but wonder whether post 9/11, the Europeans are not even more concerned with terrorism than their US counterparts. A look at media reports, legislative and judicial activities in either Britain or Germany clearly underlines that those two countries are deeply embroiled in anti-terrorist activity. Can it be that Europe is embroiled in the “War on Terror”; constantly providing for new arms in this conflict? Or is it a refusal to participate in the “War on Terror” that fuels a constant need for Parliaments to grapple with the subject; begrudgingly conceding one increasingly draconian measure after the other? The question as to where Europe stands in the “War on Terror” is a fascinating one, but one, which is difficult to answer.

Terror and the War on Dissent

Freedom of Expression in the Age of Al-Qaeda

Terror and the War on Dissent

Located within wider debates about ‘security versus liberty’ in our post 9/11 world, the book analyses the new landscape of UK counter terrorism powers and offences and focuses upon the deleterious consequences of the so-called ‘war on terror’ on freedom of political expression and association. Questioning the compatibility of recent speech-limiting measures with liberalism’s established commitment to free speech and international human rights norms, the book takes a critical look at new powers to proscribe ‘extremist’ political parties, possession offences and other criminal controls (eg. Official Secrets Act prosecutions) as well as new offences such as ‘glorification’ of terrorism. Less visible, extra-legal forms of censorship are also evaluated. The monograph concludes by asking how a more vigorous defence of unorthodox and unpopular forms of expression might be safeguarded in the UK.

The War on Terror and the Growth of Executive Power?

A Comparative Analysis

The War on Terror and the Growth of Executive Power?

The 9/11 attacks on New York and Washington prompted a "global war on terror" that led to a significant shift in the balance of executive-legislative power in the United States towards the executive at the expense of the Congress. In this volume, seasoned scholars examine the extent to which terrorist threats and counter-terrorism policies led uniformly to the growth of executive or Government power at the expense of legislatures and parliaments in other political systems, including those of Australia, Britain, Canada, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, and Russia. The contributors question whether the "crises" created by 9/11 and subsequent attacks, led inexorably to executive strengthening at the expense of legislatures and parliaments. The research reported finds that democratic forces served to mitigate changes to the balance of legislative and executive power to varying degrees in different political systems. This book will be of interest to students and researchers of Comparative Government Politics and International Politics.

America's War on Terror

The State of the 9/11 Exception from Bush to Obama

America's War on Terror

The US response to 9/11 was exceptional. The 'war on terror' challenged certain international norms as articulated in international law. This book focuses on four specific areas: US policy on the targeting, prosecution, detention, and interrogation of suspected terrorists.