The Ways Women Age

The women’s stories in this book are personal biographies that explore identity and body image and are reflexively shaped by beauty standards, expectations of femininity, and an increasingly normalized climate of cosmetic anti-aging ...

The Ways Women Age

The story of how and why some women choose to use, while others refuse, cosmetic intervention. What is it like to be a woman growing older in a culture where you cannot go to the doctor, open a magazine, watch television, or surf the internet without encountering products and procedures that are designed to make you look younger? What do women have to say about their decision to embrace cosmetic anti-aging procedures? And, alternatively, how do women come to decide to grow older without them? In the United States today, women are the overwhelming consumers of cosmetic anti-aging surgeries and technologies. And while not all women undergo these procedures, their exposure to them is almost inevitable. Set against the backdrop of commercialized medicine in the United States, Abigail T. Brooks investigates the anti-aging craze from the perspective of women themselves, examining the rapidly changing cultural attitudes, pressures, and expectations of female aging. Drawn from in-depth interviews with women in the United States who choose, and refuse, to have cosmetic anti-aging procedures, The Ways Women Age provides a fresh understanding of how today’s women feel about aging. The women’s stories in this book are personal biographies that explore identity and body image and are reflexively shaped by beauty standards, expectations of femininity, and an increasingly normalized climate of cosmetic anti-aging intervention. The Ways Women Age offers a critical perspective on how women respond to 21st century expectations of youth and beauty.

The Ways Women Age

Using and Refusing Cosmetic Intervention Abigail T. Brooks. “Age. Changes. You,. but. Not. Like. Surgery”. Refusing Cosmetic Intervention Thus far in this book, women have shared their pro-intervention approaches to aging.

The Ways Women Age

The story of how and why some women choose to use, while others refuse, cosmetic intervention. What is it like to be a woman growing older in a culture where you cannot go to the doctor, open a magazine, watch television, or surf the internet without encountering products and procedures that are designed to make you look younger? What do women have to say about their decision to embrace cosmetic anti-aging procedures? And, alternatively, how do women come to decide to grow older without them? In the United States today, women are the overwhelming consumers of cosmetic anti-aging surgeries and technologies. And while not all women undergo these procedures, their exposure to them is almost inevitable. Set against the backdrop of commercialized medicine in the United States, Abigail T. Brooks investigates the anti-aging craze from the perspective of women themselves, examining the rapidly changing cultural attitudes, pressures, and expectations of female aging. Drawn from in-depth interviews with women in the United States who choose, and refuse, to have cosmetic anti-aging procedures, The Ways Women Age provides a fresh understanding of how today’s women feel about aging. The women’s stories in this book are personal biographies that explore identity and body image and are reflexively shaped by beauty standards, expectations of femininity, and an increasingly normalized climate of cosmetic anti-aging intervention. The Ways Women Age offers a critical perspective on how women respond to 21st century expectations of youth and beauty.

Successful Aging as a Contemporary Obsession

... 104, 108, 109n2 Wahome, Mutahi, 189 Walter, 59 Warren, 61, 62–63 Washington, Grace, 90–93, 97n1 Washington, Hattie, 89 Ways Women Age: Using and Refusing Cosmetic Intervention, The (Brooks), 52n4 welfare, 142–144, 150, 152–153, 158, ...

Successful Aging as a Contemporary Obsession

In recent decades, the North American public has pursued an inspirational vision of successful aging—striving through medical technique and individual effort to eradicate the declines, vulnerabilities, and dependencies previously commonly associated with old age. On the face of it, this bold new vision of successful, healthy, and active aging is highly appealing. But it also rests on a deep cultural discomfort with aging and being old. The contributors to Successful Aging as a Contemporary Obsession explore how the successful aging movement is playing out across five continents. Their chapters investigate a variety of people, including Catholic nuns in the United States; Hindu ashram dwellers; older American women seeking plastic surgery; aging African-American lesbians and gay men in the District of Columbia; Chicago home health care workers and their aging clients; Mexican men foregoing Viagra; dementia and Alzheimer sufferers in the United States and Brazil; and aging policies in Denmark, Poland, India, China, Japan, and Uganda. This book offers a fresh look at a major cultural and public health movement of our time, questioning what has become for many a taken-for-granted goal—aging in a way that almost denies aging itself.

The Routledge Companion to Beauty Politics

“The Women Are Doing It for Themselves: The Rhetoric of Choice and Agency around Female Genital 'Cosmetic Surgery.'” Australian Feminist Studies 24: 233–249. Brooks, A. 2016. The Ways Women Age: Using and Refusing Cosmetic Intervention.

The Routledge Companion to Beauty Politics

The growth of the service economy, widespread acceptance of cosmetic technologies, expansion of global media, and the intensification of scrutiny of appearance brought about by the internet have heightened the power of beauty ideals in everyday life. A range of interdisciplinary contributions by an international roster of established and emerging scholars will introduce students to the emergence of debates about beauty, including work in history, sociology, communications, anthropology, gender studies, disability studies, ethnic studies, cultural studies, philosophy, and psychology. The Routledge Companion to Beauty Politics is an essential reference work for students and researchers interested in the politics of appearance. Comprising over 30 chapters by a team of international contributors the Handbook is divided into six parts: Theorizing Beauty Politics Competing Definitions of Beauty Beauty, Activism, and Social Change Body Work Beauty and Labor Beauty and the Lifecourse The Routledge Companion to Beauty Politics is essential reading for students in Women and Gender Studies, Sociology, Media Studies, Communications, Philosophy, and Psychology.

Biomedicine and Beatitude

For sociological insights on the use of cosmetic surgery, see Abigail T. Brooks, The Ways Women Age: Using and Refusing Cosmetic Intervention (New York: New York University Press, 2017). 14. American Society of Plastic Surgeons, ...

Biomedicine and Beatitude

"Comprehensive overview of Catholic teaching on practical issues in modern medicine and bioethics. This second edition includes a new chapter on bodily modifications and a series of new figures, as well as bringing the original text up to date in light of the teachings of Pope Francis and recent events such as the covid-19 pandemic"--

Gray Matters

The Ways Women Age: Using and Refusing Cosmetic Intervention. New York UP, 2017. Brown, Ian. Sixty: A Diary of My Sixty-First Year. Random House Canada, 2016. Brown, Karen. “Not the Death He Wanted.” The New York Times, 7 Jan.

Gray Matters

Aging is one of the most compelling issues today, with record numbers of seniors over sixty-five worldwide. Gray Matters: Finding Meaning in the Stories of Later Life examines a diverse array of cultural works including films, literature, and even art that represent this time of life, often made by people who are seniors themselves. These works, focusing on important topics such as housing, memory loss, and intimacy, are analyzed in dialogue with recent research to explore how “stories” illuminate the dynamics of growing old by blending fact with imagination. Gray Matters also incorporates the life experiences of seniors gathered from over two hundred in-depth surveys with a range of questions on growing old, not often included in other age studies works. Combining cultural texts, gerontology research, and observations from older adults will give all readers a fuller picture of the struggles and pleasures of aging and avoids over-simplified representations of the process as all negative or positive.

Our Bodies Not Ourselves

WOMEN AGING FROM MENOPAUSE TO ONE HUNDRED Kathryn A. Kirigin, Carol A.B. Warren. Bordo, Susan, 1993. ... Boston Women's Health Book Collective, 2005. ... The Ways Women Age: Using and Refusing Cosmetic Intervention.

Our Bodies Not Ourselves

In 1970, the best-seller Our Bodies Ourselves was published. The focus of the authors, the Boston Health Collective, was on the youthful female body: on reproduction, sexuality, genitalia, intimacy and relationships in the context of North American cultural expectations. Our Bodies Not Ourselves is also about the female body—but on women aging from menopause to 100. Like its predecessor, Our Bodies Not Ourselves covers sexuality, genitalia, intimacy, gender norms and relationships. But the aging woman's body has many other issues, from head to toe, from skeleton to skin, and from sleep to motion. The book, an ethnography and Western cultural history of aging and gender, draws upon history, culture and social media, the authors’ own experiences as women of 70, and conversations and correspondence with more than two hundred women aged from 60-ish to 100. They consider the cultural and structural frameworks for contemporary aging: the long sweep of history, gendered cultural norms and the vast commercial and medical marketplaces for maintaining and altering the aging body. Part I, The Private Body, focuses on the embodied experiences of aging within our private households. Part II, The Public Body, explores weight, height, and adornment as old women appear among others. Part III, The Body With Others, sets the embodied experiences of aging women within their sexual and social relationships.

Egg Freezing Fertility and Reproductive Choice

Aesthetic anti-ageing surgery and technology: Women's friend or foe? Sociology of Health & Illness, 32(2), 238À257. Brooks, A. T. (2017). The ways women age: Using and refusing cosmetic intervention. New York, NY: New York University ...

Egg Freezing  Fertility and Reproductive Choice

The ebook edition of this title is Open Access, thanks to Knowledge Unlatched funding, and freely available to read online. This book explores the experiences of some of the pioneering users of social egg freezing technology in the UK and the USA. Their motivations and experiences are contextualised alongside academic discussion.

The Sociology of Health and Illness

'Lay Knowledge, Social Movements and the Use of Medicines: Personal Reflections. Health, 20(2), 77–93. Brooks, A. (2017). The Ways Women Age: Using and Refusing Cosmetic Intervention. New York, New York University Press.

The Sociology of Health and Illness

Sarah Nettleton’s The Sociology of Health and Illness has become a cornerstone text, popular with students and academics alike for its rigorous and accessible overview of the field. Building on these strengths, the fourth edition integrates fresh insights from the current literature with the core tenets of traditional medical sociology, providing students with a thorough grounding in the sociology of health and illness. The text covers a diversity of topics and draws on a wide range of analytic approaches, spanning issues such as the social construction of medical knowledge, the analysis of lay health beliefs, concepts of lifestyles and risk, the experience of illness and the sociology of the body. It also explores matters that are central to health policy, such as professional–patient relationships, health inequalities and the changing nature of health care work. A new chapter has been added, on the sociology of mental health; other chapters have been updated with illustrative examples and questions for discussion. Written for students of the social sciences, this book will also appeal to students taking vocational degrees, such as nursing, medicine and public health, who require a sociological grounding in the area. Thoroughly revised and fully updated, this fourth edition will prove invaluable to anyone looking for a clear and engaging introduction to contemporary debates within the sociology of health and illness.

The Oxford Handbook of the Sociology of Body and Embodiment

After several decades, mixed methods designs are now well developed, yet they remain an untapped tool for scholars to better understand body politics. Notes 1. ... The Ways Women Age: Using and Refusing Cosmetic Intervention.

The Oxford Handbook of the Sociology of Body and Embodiment

In popular debates over the influences of nature versus culture on human lives, bodies are often assigned to the category of "nature": biological, essential, and pre-social. The Oxford Handbook of the Sociology of Body and Embodiment challenges that view, arguing that bodies both shape and get shaped by human societies. As such, the body is an appropriate and necessary area of study for sociologists. The Handbook works to clarify the scope of this topic and display the innovations of research within the field. The volume is divided into three main parts: Bodies and Methodology; Marginalized Bodies; and Embodied Sociology. Sociologists contributing to the first two parts focus on the body and the ways it is given meaning, regulated, and subjected to legal and medical oversight in a variety of social contexts (particularly when the body in question violates norms for how a culture believes bodies "ought" to behave or appear). Sociologists contributing to the last part use the bodily as a lens through which to study social institutions and experiences. These social settings range from personal decisions about medical treatment to programs for teaching police recruits how to use physical force, from social movement tactics to countries' understandings of race and national identity. The Oxford Handbook of the Sociology of the Body also prioritizes empirical evidence and methodological rigor, attending to the ways particular lives are lived in particular physical bodies located within particular cultural and institutional contexts. Many chapters offer extended methodological reflections, providing guidance on how to conduct sociological research on the body and, at times, acknowledging the role the authors' own bodies play in developing their knowledge of the research subject.

Human Enhancement Drugs

Retrieved from https://nickbostrom.com/ethics/human-enhancement.html Brooks, A.T. (2017). The Ways Women Age: Using and Refusing Cosmetic Intervention. New York: New York University Press. Coakley, J. (2015a). Drug use and ...

Human Enhancement Drugs

Despite increasing interest in the use of human enhancement drugs (HEDs), our understanding of this phenomenon and the regulatory framework used to address it has lagged behind. Encompassing public health, epidemiology, neuroethics, sport science, criminology, and sociology, this book brings together a broad spectrum of scholarly insights and research expertise from leading authorities to examine key international issues in the field of HEDs. As "traditional" and other "new" drug markets have occupied much of the academic attention, there has been a lack of scholarly focus on human enhancement drugs. This book provides readers with a much-needed understanding of the illicit drug market of HEDs. The authors, from a variety of cultural contexts, disciplines and perspectives, include both academics and practitioners. Topics explored in this collection amongst others include: • The anti-doping industry and performance and image enhancing drugs • Steroids and gender • The use of cognitive enhancing drugs in academia • The use of sunless synthetic tanning products • The (online) trade of HEDs • Regulations of the enhancement drugs market This collection will serve as a reference for students, academics, practitioners, law enforcement and others working in this area to reflect on the current state of research and consider future priorities. This detailed exploration will provide a valuable knowledge base for those interested in human enhancement drugs, while also promoting critical discussion.

The Beauty Myth

How Images of Beauty are Used Against Women Naomi Wolf. denied food ... But moreover, women learn what we have to do from our environment. ... the Age of Surgery is not free, so we have no excuse for refusing to see their pain as real.

The Beauty Myth

The bestselling classic that redefined our view of the relationship between beauty and female identity . Every day, women around the world are confronted with a dilemma – how to look. In a society embroiled in a cult of female beauty and youthfulness, pressure on women to conform physically is constant and all-pervading. In this iconic, gripping and frank exposé, Naomi Wolf exposes the tyranny of the beauty myth through the ages and its oppressive function today, in the home and at work, in literature and the media, in relationships between men and women, between women and women. With pertinent and intelligent examples, she confronts the beauty industry and its advertising and uncovers the reasons why women are consumed by this destructive obsession. ‘Essential reading’ Guardian ‘A smart, angry, insightful book, and a clarion call to freedom. Every woman should read it’ Gloria Steinem

Facing the Mirror

Theologian Ada María Isasi-Díaz, writing about the situation of Hispanic feminists in the U.S., asks, “How more ... Many women in this study have refused to even consider cosmetic surgery because of its potential harmful effects on ...

Facing the Mirror

The women at Julie's International Salon share their experiences of bodily self-presentation, femininity, aging, and caring. Their own words are at the center of the book; the stories of their lives, fresh and compelling, are told here with affection. But beyond the stories themselves, Frida Kerner Furman explores the socio-moral significance of these beauty shop experiences, showing how they reveal as much about society at large as about older women. For in telling us how they perceive reality, make choices, and live in their worlds, the women of Julie's expose structures of power, inequality, and resistance in the larger world that all of us, young or old, beautiful or not, face every day.

Measuring the Quantum State of Light

Theologian Ada María Isasi - Díaz , writing about the situation of Hispanic feminists in the U.S. , asks , “ How ... Many women in this study have refused to even consider cosmetic surgery because of its potential harmful effects on ...

Measuring the Quantum State of Light

Appendix A: Semiclassical approximation

The Power of Looks

True, men increasingly are concerned about their appearance and increasingly try to maximize their appearance via cosmetic use and cosmetic surgery. It is undebatable, however, that women have been in and remain in a very troublesome ...

The Power of Looks

There is a saying that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, implying that beauty is subjective. But can it be said that 'better looking' people have more social power? This book provides a fascinating insight into the social stratification of people based on looks - the artificial placement of people into greater and lesser power strata based on physical appearance. The author analyzes different aspects of physical appearance such as faces, breasts, eye shapes, height and weight as they are related to social power and inequality. For example, tall people are often associated with power, with tall people being seen publicly as more capable and thus more deserving of power than shorter people. The author moreover assesses how people's physical appearance affects their chances of marriage, employment, education, and other social and economic opportunities. The book contributes to and differentiates itself from current literature by emphasizing sociological theory - including constructionism and critical theory - and research to understand the phenomenon of social aesthetics, a term coined by the author to refer to the social reaction to physical appearance.

Fashion and Age

of a New Jersey beauty shop, where she notes how what counts as resistance and capitulation remains far from clear, ... powerful women, Jane Fonda and Barbara Bush, the former through extreme disciplinary interventions and the latter ...

Fashion and Age

Throughout history certain forms and styles of dress have been deemed appropriate - or more significantly, inappropriate - for people as they age. Older women in particular have long been subject to social pressure to tone down, to adopt self-effacing, covered-up styles. But increasingly there are signs of change, as older women aspire to younger, more mainstream, styles, and retailers realize the potential of the 'grey market'. Fashion and Age is the first study to systematically explore the links between clothing and age, drawing on fashion theory and cultural gerontology to examine the changing ways in which age is imagined, experienced and understood in modern culture through the medium of dress. Clothes lie between the body and its social expression, and the book explores the significance of embodiment in dress and in the cultural constitution of age. Drawing on the views of older women, journalists and fashion editors, and clothing designers and retailers, it aims to widen the agenda of fashion studies to encompass the everyday dress of the majority, shifting the debate about age away from its current preoccupation with dependency, towards a fuller account of the lived experience of age. Fashion and Age will be of great interest to students of fashion, material culture, sociology, sociology of age, history of dress and to clothing designers.

Cosmetic Surgery

And Miss Oregon's breasts came from the manufacturers of silicone. (goodman 1989) Jacobs [a plastic surgeon in manhattan] constantly answers the call, for cleavage. “Women need it for their holiday ball gowns.” (“Cosmetic Surgery for ...

Cosmetic Surgery

Practices of cosmetic surgery have grown exponentially in recent years in both over-developed and developing worlds. What comprises cosmetic surgery has also changed, with a plethora of new procedures and an extraordinary rise of non-surgical operations. As the practices of cosmetic surgery have multiplied and diversified, so have feminist approaches to understanding them. For the first time leading feminist scholars including Susan Bordo, Kathy Davis, Vivian Sobchack and Kathryn Pauly Morgan, have been brought together in this comprehensive volume to reveal the complexity of feminist engagements with the phenomenon that still remains vastly more popular among women. Offering a diversity of theoretical, methodological and political approaches Cosmetic Surgery: A Feminist Primer presents not only the latest, cutting-edge research in this field but a challenging and unique approach to the issue that will be of key interest to researchers across the social sciences and humanities.

Skintight

of time : she refuses the negative role assigned to her because of her age . Partaking of cosmetic surgery might then be described as a Jocastan action : it is one way for women to maintain or regain central positions in the active ...

Skintight

Cosmetic surgery is everywhere: we are surrounded by altered, enhanced, skinny and stretched celebrities, in a hyped media culture that focuses increasingly on the body beautiful. Once only associated with the rich and famous, cosmetic surgery is now widely available, advertised in magazines, doctors' surgeries, and even on television. In some parts of the world it has become an aesthetic and cultural norm, yet remains deeply troubling for many. Skintight argues that cosmetic surgery is the most provocative and controversial aspect of a new 'makeover culture'. Shows such as Ten Years Younger and Extreme Makeover demonstrate that 'fixing' the body is a way to improve lifestyle and uncover true identity. Meanwhile, celebrities such as Michael Jackson and Jocelyn Wildenstein demonstrate the horrors of extreme surgical alteration. Presenting a multidisciplinary approach, and examining a wide range of popular culture case studies from women's magazines, television, architecture and the Internet amongst others, Skintight dissects the realities of cosmetic surgery and culture.

Agewise

In Massachusetts, where I live, a woman might go for decades never seeing a face that's been fixed. Why are there relatively few users and ... qu Added to that alienation are powerful positive and personal motives for rejecting surgery.

Agewise

Let’s face it: almost everyone fears growing older. We worry about losing our looks, our health, our jobs, our self-esteem—and being supplanted in work and love by younger people. It feels like the natural, inevitable consequence of the passing years, But what if it’s not? What if nearly everything that we think of as the “natural” process of aging is anything but? In Agewise, renowned cultural critic Margaret Morganroth Gullette reveals that much of what we dread about aging is actually the result of ageism—which we can, and should, battle as strongly as we do racism, sexism, and other forms of bigotry. Drawing on provocative and under-reported evidence from biomedicine, literature, economics, and personal stories, Gullette probes the ageism thatdrives discontent with our bodies, our selves, and our accomplishments—and makes us easy prey for marketers who want to sell us an illusory vision of youthful perfection. Even worse, rampant ageism causes society to discount, and at times completely discard, the wisdom and experience acquired by people over the course of adulthood. The costs—both collective and personal—of this culture of decline are almost incalculable, diminishing our workforce, robbing younger people of hope for a decent later life, and eroding the satisfactions and sense of productivity that should animate our later years. Once we open our eyes to the pervasiveness of ageism, however, we can begin to fight it—and Gullette lays out ambitious plans for the whole life course, from teaching children anti-ageism to fortifying the social safety nets, and thus finally making possible the real pleasures and opportunities promised by the new longevity. A bracing, controversial call to arms, Agewise will surprise, enlighten, and, perhaps most important, bring hope to readers of all ages.

Cosmetic Surgery Gender and Culture

on this observation by looking at scholarly feminist treatments of cosmetic surgery to argue that a similar appeal to the natural ... On the other, growing old gracefully means refusing to tamper surgically with the evidence of ageing.

Cosmetic Surgery  Gender and Culture

Women's magazines teem with its promises and horror stories; feminists ardently debate its status as harmful or heroic; surgeons and regulators compete to define which procedures can be offered and how. Through its representation, cosmetic surgery impacts on us all, not just those who go 'under the knife'. This book investigates the ways in which cosmetic surgery is shaping gender, and in the process, it questions contemporary cultural studies assumptions about how we read the media.