The Webley Service Revolver

The Webley Service Revolver

The Webley .455in service revolver is among the most powerful top-break revolvers ever produced. First adopted in 1887, in various marques it was the standard-issue service pistol for British and Commonwealth armed forces for nearly fifty years; later versions in .38in calibre went on to see further service in World War II and beyond, as well as in a host of law-enforcement roles around the world into the 1970s. Developed to give British service personnel the ability to incapacitate their opponents in 'small wars' around the globe, the Webley used the formidable – and controversial – .455in cartridge, a variant of which was known as the 'manstopper'. Users found it offered good penetration and excellent stopping power with only mild recoil – indeed, it was rated superior to the US .45 Colt in stopping power. Featuring specially commissioned full-colour artwork and close-up photographs, this is the compelling story of the Webley revolver, the powerful pistol that saw service across the British Empire and throughout two world wars.

Early Revolvers

1872 Swiss Revolver, Beaumont-Adams Revolver, Bodeo Model 1889, British Bull Dog Revolver, Enfield Revolver, Frontier Bulldog, Kerr's

Early Revolvers

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 26. Chapters: 1872 Swiss revolver, Beaumont-Adams Revolver, Bodeo Model 1889, British Bull Dog revolver, Enfield revolver, Frontier Bulldog, Kerr's Patent Revolver, Lefaucheux M1858, LeMat Revolver, M1870 Gasser, M1879 Reichsrevolver, MAS 1873 revolver, Mauser Zig-Zag, Modele 1892 revolver, Rast-Gasser M1898, Remington Model 1858, Remington Model 1875, Schmidt M1882, Tranter (revolver), Type 26 revolver, Velo-dog, Webley Revolver. Excerpt: The Webley Revolver (also known as the Webley Break-Top Revolver or Webley Self-Extracting Revolver) was, in various marks, the standard issue service pistol for the armed forces of the United Kingdom, the British Empire, and the Commonwealth from 1887 until 1963. The Webley is a top-break revolver with automatic extraction. That is, breaking the revolver open for reloading also operates the extractor. This removes the spent cartridges from the cylinder. The Webley Mk I service revolver was adopted in 1887. A later version, the Mk IV, rose to prominence during the Boer War of 1899-1902. However, the Mk VI, introduced in 1915 during the First World War, is perhaps the best-known model. Firing the large .455 Webley cartridge, Webley service revolvers are among the most powerful top-break revolvers ever produced. Although the .455 calibre Webley is no longer in military service, the .38/200 Webley Mk IV variant is still in use as a police sidearm in a number of countries. The British company Webley and Scott (P. Webley & Son before merger with W & C Scott in 1897) produced a range of revolvers from the mid 19th to late 20th centuries. Early models such as the Webley-Government (often incorrectly referred to as the Webley-Green) Army model 1879 (never adopted by the Army) and the Webley-Pryse model were first made during the 1870s. The Webley-Government aka Webley-Green is the best known and...

Webley & Scott 1914 Gun & Rifle Wholesale Catalogue

Webley & Scott 1914 Gun & Rifle Wholesale Catalogue

Webley & Scott's summer 1914 catalogue The catalogue includes illustrations and information on shotguns, rifles, cartridges, bullets and accessories. The Webley company was founded in the late 18th century by William Davies, who made bullet moulds. It was taken over in 1834 by his son-in-law, Philip Webley, who began producing percussion sporting guns. The manufacture of revolvers, for which the firm became famous, began twenty years later. At that time the company was named P. Webley & Son. In 1897 Webley amalgamated with W & C Scott and Sons to become The Webley & Scott Revolver and Arms Company Ltd of Birmingham. Webley's revolvers became the official British sidearm in 1887, remaining in British service until 1964. After 1921, however, Webley service revolvers were manufactured by the government-owned Royal Small Arms Factory in Enfield.

The Encyclopedia of Weapons of World War II

The Encyclopedia of Weapons of World War II

The encyclopedia of weapns of world war II is the most detailed and authoritative compendium of the weapons of mankind's greatesst conflict ever published. It is a must for the military, enthusiast, and all those interested in World War II.

The English Revolver

A Collectors' Guide to the Guns, Their History and Values

The English Revolver

Famous throughout the nineteenth century for the quality of its products, the English revolver industry began a steady decline after WWI from which it never recovered. Apart from the famous Webley service revolvers, many products of this important industry are little known outside of the auction house and sale room. This book sets out to rectify that situation, describing Adam's and Tranter's revolvers, as valued in their day as any of Webley's products, and including guns from the more obscure makers neglected by previous writers. In particular, the chapter on military revolvers is one of the most important sections of the book, beginning with the British government's early purchase of Colt's percussion weapon and concluding with the Webley Service revolvers, strikingly familiar to many who served in the British Army in both World Wars. Finally, many of the guns are pictured here for the first time, a number having been photographed especially for this book.

The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Novels (Slipcased Edition)

The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Novels (Slipcased Edition)

The four classic novels of Sherlock Holmes, heavily illustrated and annotated with extensive scholarly commentary, in an attractive and elegant slipcase. The publication of Leslie S. Klinger's brilliant new annotations of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's four classic Holmes novels in 2005 created a Holmes sensation. Klinger reassembles Doyle's four seminal novels in their original order, with over 1,000 notes, 350 illustrations and period photographs, and tantalizing new Sherlockian theories. Inside, readers will find: A Study in Scarlet (1887)—a tale of murder and revenge that tells of Holmes and Dr. Watson's first meeting; The Sign of Four (1889)—a chilling tale of lost treasure...and of how Watson met his wife; The Hound of the Baskervilles (1901)—hailed as the greatest mystery novel of all time; and The Valley of Fear (1914)—a fresh murder scene that leads Holmes to solve a long-forgotten mystery. Whether as a stand-alone volume or as a companion to the short stories, this classic work illuminates the timeless genius of Conan Doyle for an entirely new generation.

Repeating and Multi-Fire Weapons

A History from the Zhuge Crossbow Through the AK-47

Repeating and Multi-Fire Weapons

 From the very earliest days of organized warfare, combatants have wanted to develop weapons with more firepower. This has inevitably led to a wide variety of repeating weapons, capable of a degree of sustained fire without reloading. Based largely upon new research, this book explores the history of repeating and multi-fire weapons, beginning with the Chinese repeating crossbow in the 4th century BCE, and ending with the world’s most common firearm, the Kalashnikov AK-47. The author describes the potency of the machine gun in World War I, the development of the semiautomatic pistol and the role of the submachine gun in improving the effectiveness of the infantryman.

Military Revolvers

Colt Single Action Army, Webley Revolver, Enfield Revolver, Smith and Wesson Model 10, Lemat Revolver, Webley-Fosbery Automatic Revo

Military Revolvers

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 27. Chapters: Colt Single Action Army, Webley Revolver, Enfield revolver, Smith & Wesson Model 10, LeMat Revolver, Webley-Fosbery Automatic Revolver, Nagant M1895, M1917 revolver, MAS 1873 revolver, Manurhin MR 73, Colt New Service, Beaumont-Adams Revolver, Rast-Gasser M1898, Type 26 revolver, Modele 1892 revolver, M1870 Gasser, Bodeo Model 1889, Schmidt M1882, M1879 Reichsrevolver, Colt M1905 New Marine, Henrion, Dassy & Heuschen Revolver, Union Automatic Revolver, 1872 Swiss revolver, Mauser Zig-Zag, Ganahl Revolver. Excerpt: The Colt Single Action Army (also known as the Model P, Peacemaker, M1873, Single Action Army, SAA, and Colt 45) is a single action revolver with a revolving cylinder holding six metallic cartridges. It was designed for the U.S. government service revolver trials of 1873 by Colt's Patent Firearms Manufacturing Company, today Colt's Manufacturing Company, and adopted as the standard military service revolver until 1892. The Colt Single Action Army has been offered in over 30 different calibers and various barrel lengths. Its overall appearance has remained consistent since 1873. Colt has discontinued its production twice, but brought it back due to popular demand. The revolver was popular with ranchers, lawmen, and outlaws alike, but current models are mostly bought by collectors and reenactors. Its design has influenced the production of numerous other models from other companies. Bound by the Rollin White patent (#12,648, April 3, 1855) and not wanting to pay a royalty fee to Smith & Wesson, Colt could not begin development of bored-through revolver cylinders for metallic cartridge use until April 4, 1869. The Colt Single Action Army was designed for the United States government service revolver trials of 1873 by Colt's Patent Firearms Manufacturing Company and adopted as the standard military service...

Who Thinks Evil

A Professor Moriarty Novel

Who Thinks Evil

In London, 1892, a well-guarded young nobleman goes missing under distressing circumstances. The nobleman, one Baron Renfrew, is actually Prince Albert Victor, eldest grandson of Queen Victoria. He disappeared while he was visiting a house of ill repute, with bodyguards both inside and outside the building—with his inside bodyguard rendered unconscious and the trussed-up corpse of a brutally murdered young woman left behind. Hoping to find the missing Prince and to clear him of the murder, the royal family is looking for a brilliant—and, more importantly, discreet—investigator. Sherlock Holmes, alas, is out of the country so, at the suggestion of his brother Mycroft, they turn to the only man who just might be more brilliant—Dr. James Moriarty. Moriarty, at the time, is up on charges of murder, awaiting retrial after his first jury was hung. In exchange for his release and the murder charges (of which he's innocent), the so-called "Napoleon of Crime" will use all his resources to track down the missing prince and find out who is behind his disappearance and the brutal murders left in his wake. He soon finds that someone out there is laying a trail, setting up Moriarty himself to take the fall for the crimes. If the real Moriarty doesn't manage to unravel and foil this plot soon, he may never again draw another free breath. Who Thinks Evil is the fifth Professor Moriarty novel from Michael Kurland.

Barefoot King

Barefoot King

embittered, shell-shocked veteran of First World War trench horror embarks on a titanic quest to address social and economic evils of post-war Liverpool dockland, wages a bitter and violent struggle against unions and shipowners