The Wedding Feast War

This book has made extensive use of British Parliamentary Papers, official War Office dispatches and personal accounts and correspondence to tell the full story of this neglected yet fascinating episode of South African military history, ...

The Wedding Feast War

The last of the nine Frontier Wars fought between 1799–1877 was in many ways a ‘prequel’ to the more famous Zulu War of 1879, featuring as it did many of the British regiments and personalities who were to fight at Isandlwana, as well as being the final defeat of the Xhosa people and their reduction to lowly workers for the colonists. This war saw conflict between the British authorities (the governor-general and the commander-in-chief) and the government of the Cape, leading to the dismissal of that government by Sir Bartle Frere, the Governor-General. This book has made extensive use of British Parliamentary Papers, official War Office dispatches and personal accounts and correspondence to tell the full story of this neglected yet fascinating episode of South African military history, which provides an insight into the origins of and attitudes of the principal figures in the following conflict with the Zulus.

Zulu Warriors

254; Smithers, Kaffir Wars, p. 266. Hummel (ed.), Crealock, p. 24, note 14; Smith, Wedding Feast War, p. 115. In 1878 the FAMP would also appropriate the name ofits Khoekhoe predecessor, and become the Cape Mounted Riflemen.

Zulu Warriors

Toward the end of the nineteenth century, the British embarked on a concerted series of campaigns in South Africa. Within three years they waged five wars against African states with the intent of destroying their military might and political independence and unifying southern Africa under imperial control. This is the first work to tell the story of this cluster of conflicts as a single whole and to narrate the experiences of the militarily outmatched African societies. Deftly fusing the widely differing European and African perspectives on events, John Laband details the fateful decisions of individual leaders and generals and explores why many Africans chose to join the British and colonial forces. The Xhosa, Zulu, and other African military cultures are brought to vivid life, showing how varying notions of warrior honor and manliness influenced the outcomes for African fighting men and their societies.

Argument is War Relevance Theoretic Comprehension of the Conceptual Metaphor of War in the Apocalypse

John seems to be quickly—and, one might say, violently—turning the celebratory wedding supper into a cannibalistic frenzy (see ... The context prompts for meaning.145 John uses the wedding “supper” to contextualize the battle “supper.

Argument is War  Relevance Theoretic Comprehension of the Conceptual Metaphor of War in the Apocalypse

In Revelation’s history, scholars have always assumed God’s violence was judgment. In Argument is War, however, Clifford T. Winters demonstrates that the “war” is using a conceptual metaphor to envision the restoration of Israel and, through them, the whole world.

The Land Wars

... 6 (December 1982), http://samilitaryhistory.org, and in Keith Smith, The Wedding Feast War: The Final Tragedy of the Xhosa People (London: Frontline Books, 2012). Two aspects of the Eight Cape Frontier War have received attention.

The Land Wars

Perhaps the most explosive issue in South Africa today is the question of land ownership. The central theme in this country’s colonial history is the dispossession of indigenous African societies by white settlers, and current calls for land restitution are based on this loss. Yet popular knowledge of the actual process by which Africans were deprived of their land is remarkably sketchy. This book recounts an important part of this history, describing how the Khoisan and Xhosa people were dispossessed and subjugated from the time that Europeans first arrived until the end of the Cape Frontier Wars (1779–1878). The Land Wars traces the unfolding hostilities involving Dutch and British colonial authorities, trekboers and settlers, and the San, Khoikhoin, Xhosa, Mfengu and Thembu people – as well as conflicts within these groups. In the process it describes the loss of land by Africans to successive waves of white settlers as the colonial frontier inexorably advanced. The book does not shy away from controversial issues such as war atrocities committed by both sides, or the expedient decision of some of the indigenous peoples to fight alongside the colonisers rather than against them. The Land Wars is an epic story, featuring well-known figures such as Ngqika, Lord Charles Somerset and his son, Henry, Andries Stockenström, Hintsa, Harry Smith, Sandile, Maqoma, Bartle Frere and Sarhili, and events such as the arrival of the 1820 Settlers and the Xhosa cattle-killing. It is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand South Africa’s past and present.

Satan the Heavenly Adversary of Man

Because of her trespasses, she will not experience the joy associated with weddings anymore. ... These binary word pairs (whore/bride; wedding supper/the great supper of God; wedding feast/war of judgment; Babylon/the New Jerusalem) all ...

Satan  the Heavenly Adversary of Man

Cato Gulaker employs narrative criticism to explore where the depiction of Satan found in the Book of Revelation is positioned on the axis of two divergent roles. The literary character of Satan is commonly perceived to gradually evolve from the first divine agents in the Hebrew Bible, representing the darker sides of the divine governing of affairs (Job 1–2; Zech 3; 1 Chr 21:1; Num 22:22, 32), to the full-blown enemy of God of the post-biblical era. However, Gulaker posits that texts referring to Satan in between these two poles are not uniform and diverge considerably. This book argues for a new way of perceiving Satan in Revelation that provides a more probable reading, as it creates less narrative dissonance than the alternative of the ancient combat myth/cosmic conflict between Satan and God. From this reading emerges a subdued Satan more akin to its Hebrew Bible hypotexts and Second Temple Judaism parallels – one that fits seamlessly with the theology, cosmology and the overarching plot of the narrative itself. Gulaker explores the functions of Satan in a text written relatively late compared to the rest of the New Testament, but with strong affinities to the Hebrew Bible, concluding that Satan is characterized more as the leash, rod, and sifting device in the hand of God, than as his enemy.

Healing Through the Sacraments

War with the Word made flesh ? War with the Word that invites me to the wedding feast ? War with the Word that gives itself as my food ? But why this continual war ? Why can't this festive meal be a gentler thing ?

Healing Through the Sacraments

Sacraments are visible signs of an invisible healing, "medicine for immortality," according to St. Ignatius of Antioch. The sacraments are meant to be experienced as personal encounters with Christ in his Church, so that the healing we so urgently need can go forth from them. The purpose of this book is to contribute to that experience.

War in Greek Mythology

The Lapith King Pirithous was in the happy process of marrying the horsewoman Hippodamia, whose name means 'tamer of horses', when the wedding feast erupted into bloody chaos that escalated into a full-scale battle, the Centauromachy.

War in Greek Mythology

A study of the Greek mythological wars between Olympians, Titans, giants, centaurs, lapiths and humans, and their significant influence on later cultures. Even though war and conflict generally feature prominently in Greek mythology, comparatively little has been written on the subject. This is surprising because wars and battles in Greek mythology are freighted with symbolism and laden with meaning and significance—historical, political, social and cultural. The gods and goddesses of war are prominent members of the Greek pantheon: the battles fought by and between Olympians, Titans, giants and Amazons, between centaurs and lapiths, were pivotal in Greek civilization. The Trojan War itself had huge and far-reaching consequences for subsequent Greek culture. The ubiquity of war themes in the Greek myths reflects the prominence of war in everyday Greek life and society, which makes the relative obscurity of published literature all the more puzzling. This book redresses this by showing how conflict in mythology and legend resonated loudly as essential, existentialist even, symbols in Greek culture and how they are represented in classical literature, philosophy, religion, feminism, art, statuary, ceramics, architecture, numismatics, etymology, astronomy, even vulcanology. Praise for War in Greek Mythology “An excellent study of the more military of the Greek myths, telling the stories while also acknowledging the many different versions of so many of them, and also the varying attitudes of the ancient Greeks to these stories.” —History of War

Gospel Centered Marriage Counseling

When we read the end of the story in Revelation 19, we learn that life on this earth ends with a virtuous wedding and a victorious war. Life as we know it will end with two suppers—a wedding feast and a war feast.

Gospel Centered Marriage Counseling

Pastors and counselors regularly minister to people whose marriages or families are in crisis. Tempers run high and feelings are brought low when a marriage is hurting or a family is in disarray. Pastors and counselors need practical, biblical help in order to connect their theological training to the reality of modern messy relationships. These how-to training manuals provide relevant, user-friendly equipping for pastors, counselors, lay leaders, educators, and students, enabling them to competently and compassionately relate God's Word to marriage and family life.

Rorke s Drift and Isandlwana

For the Ninth Cape Frontier War, see Keith Smith, The Wedding Feast War: The Final Tragedy of the Xhosa People (London: Frontline Books, 2012). For the Cape Frontier Wars generally, see John Milton, The Edges of War: A 82.

Rorke s Drift and Isandlwana

The battle of Isandlwana on 22 January 1879, the first major encounter in the Anglo-Zulu War, witnessed the worst single day's loss of British troops between the battle of Waterloo in 1815 and the opening campaigns of the First World War in August 1914. Moreover, decisive defeat at the hands of the Zulu came as an immense shock to a Victorian public that had become used to easy victories over less technologically advanced indigenous foes in an expanding empire. The successful defence of Rorke's Drift, which immediately followed the encounter at Isandlwana (and for which 11 Victoria Crosses were awarded), averted military disaster and went some way to restore wounded British pride, but the sobering memory of defeat at Isandlwana lingered for many years, while the legendary tale of the defence of Rorke's Drift was re-awakened for a new generation in the epic 1964 film Zulu, starring Michael Caine. In this new volume in the Great Battles series, Ian F. W. Beckett tells the story of both battles, investigating not only their immediate military significance but also providing the first overarching account of their continuing cultural impact and legacy in the years since 1879, not just in Britain but also from the once largely inaccessible and overlooked Zulu perspective.

Dead Was Everything

Smith, Keith, The Wedding Feast War: the Final Tragedy of the Xhosa People, London: Frontline Books, 2012. Smith, Keith (ed.), Local General Orders Relating to the Anglo-Zulu War 1879, Banora Point, NSW: privately published, 2005.

Dead Was Everything

The Anglo-Zulu War of 1879 still intrigues both scholars and enthusiasts alike more than 130 years after it was fought. Its story contains tragedy, high drama and the heavy loss of human life; it involved five major battles and two lesser fights; and led to the snuffing out of the direct male Napoleonic line of France. And all this in less than one year.??Reflecting on several years' research, Keith Smith presents a series of essays which explore hitherto unanswered questions and offer fresh insights into the key battles and protagonists of this epic conflict. He presents some surprising conclusions which differ, often radically, from more orthodox views.??He also sets out to reveal the characters of the men – of both sides – who might otherwise have been simply names on a page. They are not: they lived, loved, fought and died. Some were heroes while others were less than that. Most were ordinary men who chose a military career and did their best as far as they were able. White or black, British or colonial, they are all brought to life and their unique stories told. This is an important contribution to our understanding of this famous war and the men who fought in it.

Encyclopedia of African Colonial Conflicts 2 volumes

The Wedding Feast War. The Final Tragedy of the Xhosa People. London: Frontline Books, 2012. Smith, Peter C. Victoria's Victories. New York: Hippocrene, 1987. Smith, Woodruff D. The German Colonial Empire. Chapel Hill: University of ...

Encyclopedia of African Colonial Conflicts  2 volumes

Two volumes introduce the history of colonial wars in Africa and illustrate why African countries like the Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Somalia, and Sudan continue to experience ethnic, political, and religious violence in the early 21st century. • Begins with a helpful introduction and overview of the topic • Contains alphabetical entries on wars, campaigns, battles, leaders, and other topics related to European colonial conquest in Africa • Includes African rebellions against the early colonial states in the 1890s and early 1900s • Features entries written by scholars in the fields of history and politics • Covers all major regions of Africa as well as relevant European powers • Provides a list of additional sources for further reading

A British Profession of Arms

Studies in the Anglo-Zulu War. Doncaster, UK: D. P. & G. Military Publishers, 2008. ———. The Wedding Feast War: The Final Tragedy of the Xhosa People. London: Frontline Books, 2012. Smith, Martin. General Sir William Lockhart: Soldier ...

A British Profession of Arms

“You offer yourself to be slain,” General Sir John Hackett once observed, remarking on the military profession. “This is the essence of being a soldier.” For this reason as much as any other, the British army has invariably been seen as standing apart from other professions—and sometimes from society as a whole. A British Profession of Arms effectively counters this view. In this definitive study of the late Victorian army, distinguished scholar Ian F. W. Beckett finds that the British soldier, like any other professional, was motivated by considerations of material reward and career advancement. Within the context of debates about both the evolution of Victorian professions and the nature of military professionalism, Beckett considers the late Victorian officer corps as a case study for weighing distinctions between the British soldier and his civilian counterparts. Beckett examines the role of personality, politics, and patronage in the selection and promotion of officers. He looks, too, at the internal and external influences that extended from the press and public opinion to the rivalry of the so-called rings of adherents of major figures such as Garnet Wolseley and Frederick Roberts. In particular, he considers these processes at play in high command in the Second Afghan War (1878–81), the Anglo-Zulu War (1879), and the South African War (1899–1902). Based on more than thirty years of research into surviving official, semiofficial, and private correspondence, Beckett’s work offers an intimate and occasionally amusing picture of what might affect an officer’s career: wealth, wives, and family status; promotion boards and strategic preferences; performance in the field and diplomatic outcomes. It is a remarkable depiction of the British profession of arms, unparalleled in breadth, depth, and detail.

Apocalypse

21 , where the birds are said to be eating the bodies after the war , to indicate that the dead are not buried . That is not what God's feast means , however . The antithesis with the wedding feast of the Lamb and the background in ...

Apocalypse

The Book of Revelation has always been a mysterious and intriguing book, describing in symbolic terms the confrontation between the Disciples of Christ and the powers - political and supernatural - that hold sway over the current age. Fundamentalists have been attracted to the book and have sought to decipher its strange symbols as coded prophecy of future events. But as Pablo Richard shows in Apocalypse, the most powerful readings of the Book of Revelation are through the eyes of the oppressed, living out their Christian faith in the context of the modern empire. It is they who identify most strongly with Revelation's ultimate message of hope and life in the midst of death and persecution. Apocalypse first provides a general introduction to the reading of Revelation by examining three keys for its understanding: the historical, he sociological, and the literary-structural. The book then goes on to explore the whole of the Book of Revelation, following the book's own structure. Each section provides a line-by-line reading of the text, establishing the literal meaning before applying the interpretive keys already established.

Untutored Lines

His abduction of Helen, far from leading to the nuptials promised by Venus in Lucian's version (which Heywood knew well), is the exchange of a wedding feast for the grim strokes of war. This juxtaposition of weddings and wars is, ...

Untutored Lines

Provides a new understanding of the epyllion as a genre exploiting the subversive potential of various educational thresholds, such as the transition from grammar to rhetoric.

Rorke s Drift and Isandlwana

For the biographies of the major participants, see Greaves and Knight, Who's Who in the Zulu War (2 vols), and Laband, Historical Dictionary of ... For the Cape Frontier War of 1878, see K. Smith, The Wedding Feast War (London, 2012).

Rorke s Drift and Isandlwana

The battle of Isandlwana on 22 January 1879 was one of the most dramatic episodes in military history. In the morning, 20,000 Zulus overwhelmed the British invading force in one of the greatest disasters ever to befall a British army. Later the same day, a Zulu force of around 3,000 warriors turned their attention to a small outpost at Rorke’s Drift defended by around 150 British and Imperial troops. The British victory that ensued – against remarkable odds – would go down as one of the most heroic actions of all time. In this thrilling blow-by-blow account, Chris Peers draws on firsthand testimonies from both sides to piece together the course of the battles as they unfolded. Along the way, he exposes many of the Victorian myths to reveal great acts of bravery as well as cases of cowardice and incompetence. A brief analysis of the aftermath of the battle and notes on the later careers of the key participants completes this gripping exposé of this legendary encounter.

Gunpowder Masculinity and Warfare in German Texts 1400 1700

... the siege of Bertschi's haystack at the end of the war fails neither for a lack of military knowledge nor because of ... can suddenly appear out of nowhere, a full-scale war can break out between two villages during a wedding feast, ...

Gunpowder  Masculinity  and Warfare in German Texts  1400 1700

How gunpowder technology exploded heroes, heroics, and war stories from 1400 to 1700, and how German writers tried to glue them back together

We Are at War

Why then should we doubt that the power of God's enemy is behind our on-going crises and wars? ... The Wedding Feast at Canal Those who still doubt the power of His Mother to persuade Jesus are advised to reflect on the Wedding Feast at ...

We Are at War

OUR MISSION IN THESE SIX BOOKS 1.Growing Decline in World Peace We started our long journey in these six Books with an expression of concern over the growing decline in world peace. Our Mission throughout our Six Books had therefore focused on our views on how the state of World Peace can be advanced. 2. Enhancing unity between Christianity and Secularity. We expressed at the beginning of our first Book that one major source of the growing decline in world peace is the on-going wars and crises between the Religious and Secular worlds of today. This source of global crises had been acknowledged in a recent conference of global Religious Leaders held in Assisi at the invitation of Pope Benedict XVI. The Conference participants resolved unanimously to address this source of crises in world peace. Global Secular Leaders had also expressed much concern on the growing decline in world peace. They did so again at the last meeting of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. 3.Our Mission to contribute to Pope Benedict XVIs New Evangelization In our view, the recent launching of the New Evangelization by Pope Benedict XVI reflected in part the resolution of Religious Leaders in the Assisi Conference to find ways of addressing the growing decline in world peace due partly to Religious conflicts with Secularity across the world. The Pope called on all Lay members of the Catholic Church and Christians in general to contribute to the success of the Popes New Evangelization-PCNE. As we expressed throughout our six books, our mission in these Books is to respond to the call by Pope Benedict XVI. 4. Military and Secular Perspectives on the Religious and Secular Peace We stated clearly from the start, that our contribution would reflect on the military and secular aspects of the growing conflicts between Christianity and Secularity, using the global experience in both sectors by our Author throughout his career. We had to take these perspectives because we must identify the source, leadership and strategies in the wars and conflicts between the Religious and Secular worlds . Unless we know the leaders in the conflicts and their missions we cannot achieve any progress in resolving these wars and crises and enhance the level of world peace. 5. My Background A few words of introduction on my background may enable the Reader understand my perspectives in these Books. I started the project of writing the Books because I am convinced that I can contribute to the PCNE by bringing my African background in Nigeria, education at the London School of Economics and exposure to global secular governance through my position as a former Economic Adviser with The U.K. Government and a Senior Economist at The World Bank. 6. Is anything wro

Iliad the MAXNotes Literature Guides

The Legend of the Trojan War The events leading up to the Trojan War supposedly began with a wedding feast in Troy . The wedding celebrated the marriage of Thetis , who was a goddess , and Peleus , who was a mortal .

Iliad  the  MAXNotes Literature Guides

REA's MAXnotes for Homer's The Illiad MAXnotes offer a fresh look at masterpieces of literature, presented in a lively and interesting fashion. Written by literary experts who currently teach the subject, MAXnotes will enhance your understanding and enjoyment of the work. MAXnotes are designed to stimulate independent thought about the literary work by raising various issues and thought-provoking ideas and questions. MAXnotes cover the essentials of what one should know about each work, including an overall summary, character lists, an explanation and discussion of the plot, the work's historical context, illustrations to convey the mood of the work, and a biography of the author. Each chapter is individually summarized and analyzed, and has study questions and answers.

Old Plantation Days Being Recollections of Southern Life Before the Civil War

Thetime for her wedding was appointedand invitations sentout for a country wedding. The day came, and hour afterhour we heard heavy cannonading. We knewa battle was being fought nearus, but could learnno particulars.

Old Plantation Days  Being Recollections of Southern Life Before the Civil War

The texture of life in the antebellum South emerges in the personal reminiscences of a Southern woman.

The Book of Revelation

He judges and wages war in called to the wedding feast of the righteousness . 12His eyes were slike ) a the wedding feast of the Lamb " ( 19 : 9 ) . This beatitude is about the establishment of God's kingdom , and being the very words ...

The Book of Revelation

"Complete biblical texts with sound, scholarly based commentary that is written at a pastoral level; the Scripture translation is that of the New American Bible with Revised New Testament and Revised Psalms (1991)"--Provided by publisher.