The Wind in My Hair

It was just fun to feel the warmth of the sun on my skin, the wind running through my hair; it was good to be alive. Kambiz was clicking away with his camera. My mood lifted. I needed a change. For some time now, my writing had been ...

The Wind in My Hair

An extraordinary memoir from an Iranian journalist in exile about leaving her country, challenging tradition and sparking an online movement against compulsory hijab. A photo on Masih's Facebook page: a woman standing proudly, face bare, hair blowing in the wind. Her crime: removing her veil, or hijab, which is compulsory for women in Iran. This is the self-portrait that sparked 'My Stealthy Freedom,' a social media campaign that went viral. But Masih is so much more than the arresting face that sparked a campaign inspiring women to find their voices. She's also a world-class journalist whose personal story, told in her unforgettably bold and spirited voice, is emotional and inspiring. She grew up in a traditional village where her mother, a tailor and respected figure in the community, was the exception to the rule in a culture where women reside in their husbands' shadows. As a teenager, Masih was arrested for political activism and was surprised to discover she was pregnant while in police custody. When she was released, she married quickly and followed her young husband to Tehran where she was later served divorce papers to the shame and embarrassment of her religiously conservative family. Masih spent nine years struggling to regain custody of her beloved only son and was forced into exile, leaving her homeland and her heritage. Following Donald Trump's notorious immigration ban, Masih found herself separated from her child, who lives abroad, once again. A testament to a spirit that remains unbroken, and an enlightening, intimate invitation into a world we don't know nearly enough about, The Wind in My Hair is the extraordinary memoir of a woman who overcame enormous adversity to fight for what she believes in, and to encourage others to do the same.

The Wind in My Hair

The Wind in My Hair


Vahudrick L the Blood Gift

the wind in my hair. I had to remember to check out my account later and get some cash. In the shower, I let the water run down my head loosening up all that gel in my hair. It never fails, every time I get my hair done I lose several ...

Vahudrick   L the Blood Gift


Ride Steady

“Never been on a bike,” I told her and her face split in a big smile. ... I'd fallen in love with something I couldn't have, and if I fell in love with the wind in my hair and the moon on my skin, without someone to give that to me, ...

Ride Steady

Meet the intense and sexy bad boy bikers of the Chaos Motorcycle Club in Carissa and Joker's story from Kristen Ashley's New York Times bestselling series. The ride of her life . . . Once upon a time, Carissa Teodoro believed in happy endings. Money, marriage, motherhood: everything came easy---until she woke up to the ugly truth about her Prince Charming. Now a struggling, single mom and stranded by a flat tire, Carissa's pondering her mistakes when a vaguely familiar knight rides to her rescue on a ton of horsepower. Climb on and hold tight . . . In high school, Carson Steele was a bad boy loner who put Carissa on a pedestal where she stayed far beyond his reach. Today, he's the hard-bodied biker known only as Joker, and from the way Carissa's acting, it's clear she's falling fast. While catching her is irresistible, knowing what to do with her is a different story. A good girl like Carissa is the least likely fit with the Chaos Motorcycle Club. Too bad holding back is so damned hard. Now, as Joker's secrets are revealed and an outside threat endangers the club, Joker must decide whether to ride steady with Carissa---or ride away forever . . .

Women In The Wind Fearless Women of the 20th and 21st Centuries

“Not all my women-biker friends started their motorcycle careers during adolescence by riding on the back, behind some boy (who had to be kept secret from our overly-concerned fathers!) ... I loved the wind in my hair and the freedom!

Women In The Wind   Fearless Women of the 20th and 21st Centuries

Female Road Stories. Book about Fearless Women who ride or rode Motorcycles across continents and more. Empowering Women's Stories from 20th and 21st Centuries.

Heartstrings

I'm already there with my Cuban cigars and my Mexican beer The weather's together I wish you were here I can go anywhere in my Adirondack chair With my feet in the sand and the wind in my hair I am frequently flying though I'm not in ...

Heartstrings

Poetry and photography are universal languages spoken from the heart. When they converse together, the can flow like song. In this book, Heartstrings, you will meet siblings, a sister and brother who have joined forces to share their visions of life through their use of the lens and the pen. Although they live two thousand miles apart, they are able to combine their artistry in a way that brings their images and words together. Now this union has made it possible for you to make the journey as well, with beautiful and sometimes painful views into the world we live.

Walking Barefoot In My Shoes

Monday morning I stepped out into the brisk air with grey skies hanging above my head. The wind has already blown my hair into a different hair style which I am sure is not too fashionable. No matter, there are too many things on my ...

Walking Barefoot In My Shoes

This is the sequel of a young mother as she leaves the life of a poor Homesteader in the barren Canadian wilderness in 1950 to make a better home for herself and her children at a time when it was virtually unheard of for a woman to make such a choice. She will search for a life with an education, a warm family home filled with necessities for which she finds herself being openly criticized. With her strong faith in her Lord she receives the strength to continue her fight she feels compelled to make so the lives of her children may be richer and stronger. She will not turn back.

Dreamwalker

I have to do some things by sunset tonight and I wanted her to join me, is that cool? ... There was a light cool breeze blowing through my hair, this reminded me to put my hair up in a pony tail, the wind in my face was one thing, ...

Dreamwalker

I started dreaming alot when I was around 8 years old. This would be around the time when most children are easily scared half to death with anything especially a bad dream. The story itself takes place in Lansing and Dimondale Michigan, the city where I grew up and spent a lot of time dreaming of life, love and of course monsters. There's a lot of history and spirituality involving the Native American heritage as well as some of my own small speculation where the Myans are concerned. The hero of this story starts out a boy and finds his way to becoming a man through the highly spiritual, violent and majical world of dreams. Along the way he learns his own family history and finds love in the most peculiar place. I hope you enjoy the story as much as I enjoyed writing it for you.

Explorations of Value

One of the most interesting relationships in Dances with Wolves is between John Dunbar and Wind in My Hair . Initially , Wind in My Hair is extremely hostile to Dunbar . He shows his hostility by proposing that Dunbar be killed ...

Explorations of Value

The essays in Explorations of Value are drawn from work first presented at the 20th Conference of Value Inquiry. They are not mere records of conference presentations. The authors have reflected on their initial presentations. They have re-thought arguments in light of discussions at the conference. They have revised their work. All of this has combined to bring fresh ideas on important issues into carefully considered discussions.The nineteen authors of the essays do not share a common viewpoint on all problems of value inquiry. They are certainly not in agreement in their conclusions. Their concerns, however, cluster around a recognizable body of questions. Several of the authors raise fundamental questions on the nature of values and the possibility of giving them an objective status. Some of the authors raise questions about where value inquiry becomes value advocacy. They are also ready to ask whether or not advocacy is in the legitimate purview of philosophers. A number of authors set out to examine conditions of moral practice and of harming or benefiting people in general. Other authors show a concern for juxtaposing moral values and aesthetic values, in some cases to observe similarities, in some, differences. Finally, a few authors focus on particular notions such as forgiveness, intimacy, and love that are central to our lives.

Princess at Sea

Muttering under his breath, Captain Rylan hauled me to the other end of the porch. ... The wind in my head gibbered at the wind in the trees, inciting it to swirl down to find me. ... The wind gusted, pushing my hair back.

Princess at Sea

Assigned to chaperone Queen Contessa and her husband on their honeymoon, Tess takes on pirates who abduct the royal couple for ransom-unaware that Tess's magic is the real treasure in their midst.

On the Verge

I rarely take the train, but whenever I do, whenever I first feel the wind in my hair and start to hear the train, I can't help but feel like it's the beginning of a movie about my life, like somehow my fate is going to change.

On the Verge

Twenty-three-year-old Jersey girl Eve Vitali is on the verge of something...whether it be a relationship, the fabulous life that she reads about in the Styles section of the New York Times or a nervous breakdown. Despite her Jackie O. suit, Eve works as an unappreciated assistant for -- of all things -- a bicycle magazine. Everyone keeps telling her that she's got her foot in the door, but the rest of her is surfing the Net and schlepping around with Tabitha, an Amazonian sex goddess. Between glam parties, obligatory visits home and myriad men, Eve is realizing that it takes a lot of work to get beyond the verge and on to the next big thing.... It seems everyone has advice on how to get there: Eve (on keeping her "foot in the door"): "Develop artificial cheeriness. Answer all requests with 'great.' Hypothetical: Person of dubious authority: 'Eve, why don't you count all of the paper clips in the entire department and then divide them into seven equal piles?' Me: 'Great. I'll get right on it. That'll be great.'" Tabitha (prefers foreign men, gets entree to the coolest parties, buys lots of underwear): "Remove unsightly hairs before all dates." Roseanne (Eve's roommate who works in -- gasp! -- finance): "Whatever you do, don't be predictable."

Exploring Poetry with Young Children

I shall take out my kite and give it a try Long tails streaming, just watch it fly. ... up my nose Wind on my face And wind around my ears My eyes have caught the sand It makes them full of tears Wind in my hair And wind on my back ...

Exploring Poetry with Young Children

With the increased focus on children’s language in Early Years education, poetry can be a valuable tool in enhancing speaking, listening and communication. This book provides parents and practitioners with a guide on how and where to start with using poetry with children. Combined with practical suggestions on finding and using poems with children of differing ages and language ability, it also offers advice on how to encourage children to create and develop their own poems. Exploring Poetry with Young Children includes an anthology of a wide range of poems to use with children based on their everyday experiences, ensuring that adults can enhance the learning experience as it happens and enrich the language development of the children in their care. Divided into two parts, this book covers: the nature of poetry and why it can be such important part of our well-being; ways of using and sharing poetry with babies and toddlers; how to share poetry with children as they become confident users of language; the rhyming aspects of verse and ways in which these can be used to develop children’s phonic awareness; the importance of establishing a poetic awareness in young children. This will be an essential guide for all Early Years practitioners, students and parents who are interested in using poetry to develop the speaking, listening and communication skills of young children.

Anne Brigman

As the poem refracts off the photograph, Brigman brings her image to life as a place of supreme serenity, ... And it's glad I am of the wind in my hair, And glad of its kiss on my breasts and face And its lift and swirl as I stand here ...

Anne Brigman

The life and work of an essential photographer whose feminism and pictorialist images distanced her from the mainstream In the first book devoted to Anne Brigman (1869–1950), Kathleen Pyne traces the groundbreaking photographer’s life from Hawai‘i to the Sierra and elsewhere in California, revealing how her photographs emerged from her experience of local place and cultural politics. Brigman’s work caught the eye of the well-known photographer Alfred Stieglitz, who welcomed her as one of the original members of his Photo-Secession group. He promoted her work as exemplary of his modernism and praised her Sierra landscapes with female nudes—work that at the time separated Brigman from the spiritualized upper-class femininity of other women photographers. Stieglitz later drew on Brigman’s images of the expressive female body in shaping the public persona of Georgia O’Keeffe into his ideal woman artist. This nuanced account reasserts Brigman’s place among photography’s most important early advocates and provides new insight into the gender and racialist dynamics of the early twentieth-century art world, especially on the West Coast of the United States.

Our stories our lives

a lot was also a hijabi, but because she couldn't wear a hijab all the time, she'd wear a baseball cap instead to hide her hair. So my daughter got in the car and I say to her, “So, is this the way you're thinking of going?

Our stories  our lives

In the early years of the 21st century, a number of Muslim women have achieved positions of influence. Women who care about the society in which they live and bring up their children are increasingly finding a voice and working together to make things happen. There's some way to go in harnessing the potential that lies at the heart of this change, but there is plenty of evidence that Muslim women are paving the way forward in new dynamic, challenging and creative ways. This book is all about women who have shown courage, dignity and strength; pioneers who have recognized their potential in the public and private realms of society, who have struggled, made sacrifices, taken pride in their multiple identities and who are committed to positive and peaceful change in the UK. This book presents the stories of 20 women from Bradford between the ages of 14 and 80, from their own perspectives. Based on a broader project called OurLives, which was designed to explore the insights and experiences of over a hundred women in Bradford, it belongs to a long tradition of oral history, where practical knowledge is passed from generation to generation. The book offers an intricate mosaic of the experiences, views and hopes of these women and in so doing emphasises the power of people's lives to aid deeper debate and understanding and gives voice to an important and often marginalised group. It will be fascinating to a range of people with an interest in Muslim women's lives and views and of wider interest to students, academics, policy-makers and professionals .

Sorry Not Sorry

The Jeep had no airconditioning, which I figured was no big deal because I could always just take the top off and cruise around with the wind in my hair. But it was an extraordinarily hot day in June when I went to buy it, ...

Sorry Not Sorry

Funny and deeply personal, Sorry Not Sorry recounts Glee star Naya Rivera's successes and missteps, urging young women to pursue their dreams and to refuse to let past mistakes define them. Navigating through youth and young adulthood isn't easy, and in Sorry Not Sorry, Naya Rivera shows us that we're not alone in the highs, lows, and in-betweens. Whether it's with love and dating, career and ambition, friends, or gossip, Naya inspires us to follow our own destiny and step over--or plod through--all the crap along the way. After her rise and fall from early childhood stardom, barely eking her way through high school, a brief stint as a Hooters waitress, going through thick and thin with her mom/manager, and resurrecting her acting career as Santana Lopez on Glee, Naya emerged from these experiences with some key life lessons: Sorry: - All those times I scrawled "I HATE MY MOM" in my journal. So many moms and teenage daughters don't get along--we just have to realize it's nothing personal on either side. - At-home highlights and DIY hair extensions. Some things are best left to the experts, and hair dye is one of them. - Falling in love with the idea of a person, instead of the actual person. Not Sorry: - That I don't always get along with everyone. Having people not like you is a risk you have to take to be real, and I'll take that over being fake any day. - Laughing at the gossip instead of getting upset by it. - Getting my financial disasters out of the way early--before I was married or had a family--so that the only credit score that I wrecked was my own. Even with a successful career and a family that she loves more than anything else, Naya says, "There's still a thirteen-year-old girl inside of me making detailed lists of how I can improve, who's never sure of my own self-worth." Sorry Not Sorry is for that thirteen-year-old in all of us.

Lost Among the Living

I could hear the low howl of wind from the other side, as if someone were moaning pitifully. I lifted the latch, the damp wood chill against my palm, and pressed the door open. A gust of wind blew in at me, touching my hair.

Lost Among the Living

England, 1921. Three years after her husband, Alex, disappeared, shot down over Germany, Jo Manders still mourns his loss. Working as a paid companion to Alex's wealthy, condescending aunt, Dottie Forsyth, Jo travels to the family’s estate in the Sussex countryside. But there is much she never knew about her husband’s origins…and the revelation of a mysterious death in the Forsyths’ past is just the beginning… All is not well at Wych Elm House. Dottie's husband is distant, and her son was grievously injured in the war. Footsteps follow Jo down empty halls, and items in her bedroom are eerily rearranged. The locals say the family is cursed, and that a ghost in the woods has never rested. And when Jo discovers her husband’s darkest secrets, she wonders if she ever really knew him. Isolated in a place of deception and grief, she must find the truth or lose herself forever. And then a familiar stranger arrives at Wych Elm House…

The Other Side of My Pillow

both of our hairs flying in the wind, and Ana's smile made me feel comfortable to sit and be silent. That was really all I needed at that time, some peace and wind in my hair. Just a wordless long ride, yet so much was said, in the wind ...

The Other Side of My Pillow

Could even a war separate people that are meant to be together? The Other Side of My Pillow tells a story in the authors own unique style, itwill leave an impact on you after reading it and for a long time to come. It will have you wonder about things you dont think about often, if ever. Moreover, it will also make you realize what lifes real treasures are. The main character Alma, will be faced with numerous lifes obstacles that will turn her life drastically sour and drastically sweet thought-out the book. The adrenaline of a broken and cured heart will run up your spine as you live the dramatic situations along side Alma. The book promises tears of sorrow and tears of joy numerous times. Through Almas life youll find out some true facts about the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina as you live her life full of change, chance and choices. The driving force of the main character is definitely love. A love for her family and friends, love for her country and love for a man that shell never let go off, no matter how impossible a chance for happiness seemed.

My Life As a Traitor

My childhood stories, read to me by my parents, by my teachers, were stories of good people winning out in the end. ... I wasn't interested in making cosmic claims; I wanted to be free to walk down the street with the wind in my hair.

My Life As a Traitor

It was part youthful zeal and part teen crush that led Zarah Ghahramani to join a student protest movement. But dabbling in student politics was to lead to disaster when one day she was bundled into a car and taken to Tehran's most notorious prison: Evin. Far from her comfortable middle-class home, Zarah had to find refuge from her ruthless interrogators in a windowless concrete cell. Day after day she was humiliated and viciously beaten until all she wanted was simply to die, her spirit broken. In My Life as a Traitor, Zarah tells the story of her horrifying ordeal and her eventual release, and describes the ways it changed the naïve nineteen-year-old she once was into a woman of courage and determination.

Help I m a Parent

I could ride it around the block, be with my friends, and escape from my little brother—oh the freedom! I really did enjoy that bike and loved the feeling of the wind in my hair as I raced around on it. It made me happy to ride with ...

Help  I m a Parent

The author has written parenting columns for over 16 years for a local newspaper in the fastest growing county in the South. She has also written for and hosted a parenting radio show. Parents and grandparents have requested a book of her columns for years. Now, rather than cutting them out and putting them on the refrigerator, you can carry it with you. Since she has written a weekly column for 16 years, more books will follow.

No Certificate on the Wall

Wind. In. My. Hair. When death comes I hope I'm not surprised or if I am, at least let me be ready. I don't expect to be propped up in bed, pale, thin, white—faced, children and grandchildren hovering over me humming their concern while ...

No Certificate on the Wall

No Certificate On The Wall further reflects the person Susan Ambrosino is—a person who feels the "pull of hue" and a "bubble of ideas rising up from a whirlpool of opinions and inner voices." She is someone who sits in a "cushioned chair to think about a monstrous fears that hang from the rafters of each day." She looks into faces as well as "cracked windshields," she stands in her own "puddle of fear," a "different message in a different bottle," wondering where the "ball came from and where it is going." She writes about the "backpack of worries" she carries on her shoulders and the "shopping bag of incandescent clothes she hides under her stairs" while "carrying an eight foot fence down the road in the wind" and "flipping a switch on forgotten knowledge." Susan Ambrosino relishes her own voice, her own music, her own "silent pond," her own "shiny pearl mystery." No Certificate On The Wall is a logical sequel and continuing statement in the vein of Teenage Woman Ancient Wife.