The Woman in the Shaman s Body

Shamanism was not only humankind’s first spiritual and healing practice, it was originally the domain of women. This is the claim of Barbara Tedlock’s provocative and myth-shattering book.

The Woman in the Shaman s Body

A distinguished anthropologist–who is also an initiated shaman–reveals the long-hidden female roots of the world’s oldest form of religion and medicine. Here is a fascinating expedition into this ancient tradition, from its prehistoric beginnings to the work of women shamans across the globe today. Shamanism was not only humankind’s first spiritual and healing practice, it was originally the domain of women. This is the claim of Barbara Tedlock’s provocative and myth-shattering book. Reinterpreting generations of scholarship, Tedlock–herself an expert in dreamwork, divination, and healing–explains how and why the role of women in shamanism was misinterpreted and suppressed, and offers a dazzling array of evidence, from prehistoric African rock art to modern Mongolian ceremonies, for women’s shamanic powers. Tedlock combines firsthand accounts of her own training among the Maya of Guatemala with the rich record of women warriors and hunters, spiritual guides, and prophets from many cultures and times. Probing the practices that distinguish female shamanism from the much better known male traditions, she reveals: • The key role of body wisdom and women’s eroticism in shamanic trance and ecstasy • The female forms of dream witnessing, vision questing, and use of hallucinogenic drugs • Shamanic midwifery and the spiritual powers released in childbirth and monthly female cycles • Shamanic symbolism in weaving and other feminine arts • Gender shifting and male-female partnership in shamanic practice Filled with illuminating stories and illustrations, The Woman in the Shaman’s Body restores women to their essential place in the history of spirituality and celebrates their continuing role in the worldwide resurgence of shamanism today. From the Hardcover edition.

The Anthropology of Health and Healing

17 Calling on the Spirits Shamans , Sorcerers , and Mediums CASE STUDY The
Healing Song of a Kunal Shaman of Panama A Kuna shaman of Panama used a
long ... 2 He accomplished this feat without touching the woman ' s body .

The Anthropology of Health and Healing

The Anthropology of Health and Healing is the first text to take an integrative approach to the discipline of medical anthropology. In this book, Mari Womack champions a practice of medicine that includes the maintenance of health as well as treatment of illness, emphasizing the importance of lifestyle and the life cycle.

Jaguar in the Body Butterfly in the Heart

This beautifully written book is not only a powerfully honest, humorous and inspiring memoir, but a guidebook for those from many cultures and walks of life wishing to return to their indigenous roots, and be part of midwifing a more benign ...

Jaguar in the Body  Butterfly in the Heart

‘Shaman’, meaning ‘intermediary between spirit and the natural world’, has become a much overused word in the West. It’s not a job title one can give oneself, and in indigenous societies, a shaman is usually born to this role. Ya’Acov Darling Khan is one of the few westerners who have been acknowledged as shamans by indigenous elders or teachers.After being hit by lightning, Ya’Acov took a 30-year journey into the heart of shamanism to seek his own healing, and to learn how he could serve others with the wisdom he acquired through his experiences. He has studied with indigenous teachers from the Arctic Circle to the USA and South America, and has taken part in ceremonies in such diverse locations as Welsh caves to the depths of the Amazon rainforest. Nowadays, Ya’Acov continues to study and regularly journeys to the Ecuadorean Amazon to work alongside the Achuar and Sápara people.For thousands of years, shamans helped the people in their communities remain in balance with themselves, each other, the natural world and the spirit world. This beautifully written book is not only a powerfully honest, humorous and inspiring memoir, but a guidebook for those from many cultures and walks of life wishing to return to their indigenous roots, and be part of midwifing a more benign human presence here on Earth as part of a new dream.

Shamans Nostalgias and the IMF

Emphasizing the shaman s work as open and mutable, Kendall describes how gods and ancestors articulate the changing concerns of clients and how the ritual fame of these transactions has itself been transformed by urban sprawl, private cars, ...

Shamans  Nostalgias  and the IMF

Thirty years ago, anthropologist Laurel Kendall did intensive fieldwork among South Korea s (mostly female) shamans and their clients as a reflection of village women s lives. In the intervening decades, South Korea experienced an unprecedented economic, social, political, and material transformation and Korean villages all but disappeared. And the shamans? Kendall attests that they not only persist but are very much a part of South Korean modernity. This enlightening and entertaining study of contemporary Korean shamanism makes the case for the dynamism of popular religious practice, the creativity of those we call shamans, and the necessity of writing about them in the present tense. Shamans thrive in South Korea s high-rise cities, working with clients who are largely middle class and technologically sophisticated. Emphasizing the shaman s work as open and mutable, Kendall describes how gods and ancestors articulate the changing concerns of clients and how the ritual fame of these transactions has itself been transformed by urban sprawl, private cars, and zealous Christian proselytizing. For most of the last century Korean shamans were reviled as practitioners of antimodern superstition; today they are nostalgically celebrated icons of a vanished rural world. Such superstition and tradition occupy flip sides of modernity s coin the one by confuting, the other by obscuring, the beating heart of shamanic practice. Kendall offers a lively account of shamans, who once ministered to the domestic crises of farmers, as they address the anxieties of entrepreneurs whose dreams of wealth are matched by their omnipresent fears of ruin. Money and access to foreign goods provoke moral dilemmas about getting and spending; shamanic rituals express these through the longings of the dead and the playful antics of greedy gods, some of whom have acquired a taste for imported whiskey. No other book-length study captures the tension between contemporary South Korean life and the contemporary South Korean shamans work. Kendall s familiarity with the country and long association with her subjects permit nuanced comparisons between a 1970s then and recent encounters some with the same shamans and clients as South Korea moved through the 1990s, endured the Asian Financial Crisis, and entered the new millennium. She approaches her subject through multiple anthropological lenses such that readers interested in religion, ritual performance, healing, gender, landscape, material culture, modernity, and consumption will find much of interest here. "

Shamanism

Each body part and bone must be named in the secret language learned from
one ' s instructor . ... The role of women in connection with the shaman rising from
his mystical death after dismemberment is well documented in the ancient hero ...

Shamanism

Unravelling the history, ideologies and rites of shamanism, Margaret Stutley provides an authoritative guide to one of the world's most ancient, notorious and frequently misrepresented spiritual traditions.

The Collected Works of Bronis aw Pi sudski The aborigines of Sakhalin

... and there the shaman also placed the woman into a kettle and scraped her
body with his own fingernails . Again the imaginary worms dropped off into the
kettle where they were covered with another similar kettle . The woman ' s clothes
 ...

The Collected Works of Bronis  aw Pi  sudski  The aborigines of Sakhalin

Volume 1, The Aborigines of Sakhalin, contains translations into English of the Polish, Russian and Japanese material on, for example, the history, folklore, economic life, shamanism, sexual life, medical anthropology, and the bear festival which has been published between 1898 and 1936, mainly in local journals which are hardly accessible today. English, French and German articles appear in the original language

Indians of North America

The Indians did not think there were great boundaries between the body and the
spirit. In the southern tribes most shaman were women. In the north most ...
Shamans, who had special powers to communicate with spirit helpers, acted out
a canoe voyage into the world below the earth where the souls of the dead
stayed.

Indians of North America

Describes the culture and religion of many of the tribes of North American Indians and gives details of white settlement and the resulting battles and massacres. Suggested level: secondary.

The Vermilion Bird

[ The chief ' s wife ] was of good stature , with blacke eies , fat of body , of an
excellent countenance , hir haire almost as ... Above all , the female shaman -
medium , dancer , and exorcist — whose body was the actual but temporary
repository of ...

The Vermilion Bird


Myth and Meaning in Early Taoism

In the " Country of Women " As a final point , and something that leads directly
into a consideration of the mythic context of this symbolism as well as the ... (
recall the shaman who fled in terror when Hu Tzu ' s primordial body was
revealed ) .

Myth and Meaning in Early Taoism


The Acculturative Role of Sea Woman

But neither idea seems to fit in with the notions held about Sea Woman by the
Polar Inuit proper . ... Nor does the variant of “ Shaman ' s Jour - ney ” , with which
the Rasmussen “ Fulmar ” variant ends , show the slightest trace of the father ' s
presence in the house of Sea Woman . ... Wrapped up in skins the body was
supposedly given a stone as a means of transportation along the bottom of the
sea .

The Acculturative Role of Sea Woman