The Yemassee

... will and compliance as if the proceeding was perfectly agreeable to him . He endured , with no little show of patience , all the blows and buffetings so freely bestowed upon him by his feminine enemies ; and if he did 82 THE YEMASSEE .

The Yemassee


The Yemassee

The Yemassee shall be free . " " He shall drink blood for strength . He shall hunt the track of the English to the shores of the big waters ; and the war - whoop shall ring death in the ear that sleeps , " cried Ishiagaska , with a ...

The Yemassee

Viewed from today's perspective, The Yemassee dramatically and unflinchingly bares the manipulation, exploitation, and eventual genocide of a proud indigenous nation that preferred extinction to the surrender of its land and the subjugation of its people.

MAN BELOVED A NOVEL OF THE YEMASSEE WAR

The Yemassee have not dealt honorably with Caesar of Echota. They have told lies and taken advantage of the Cherokee. The Cherokee were induced to enter the war against the colonists by the craftiness and falsehoods of the Yemassee.

MAN BELOVED  A NOVEL OF THE YEMASSEE WAR

"[F]ictional story based on historical events that occurred near his [the author's] home in South Carolina"--From the cover.

An Early and Strong Sympathy

The Yemassee 1 : 186 . ( “ Hear , Opitchi - Manneyto " ) . The Yemassee 1 : 187 . ( “ I take from thee the earth of Yemassee- " ) . The Yemassee 1 : 220 . [ " Sangarrah - me , Yemassee " ) . The Yemassee 2:59 .

An Early and Strong Sympathy

Literary writings that reveal nineteenth-century perceptions of Native Americans; Novelist William Gilmore Simms (1806-1870) and the Indians who lived in the southeast United States during the nineteenth century have shared a similar and unfortunate fate - both have been largely neglected in mainstream scholarship of literature and ethnohistory. In a volume that remedies this oversight, John Caldwell Guilds, an authority on Simms, and Charles Hudson, an authority on Southeastern Indians, collaborate to reveal fresh perspectives on both. They offer an anthology of Simms's writings that establishes him as a knowledgeable, prolific, and sympathetic portrayer of Native Americans in fiction and poetry. This groundbreaking anthology identifies more than one hundred works by Simms on Indians, including his best and most representative writings, some of which have never before been published. The passages range from romantic, poetic fantasies to attentive descriptions that are valuable primary resources for historians and anthropologists. Written from Simms's youth in the 1820s until his death in 1870, the selections document the transformation of the South from a frontier where Indians, A

The Yemassee Lands

By the day - sun and the night - sun , By the new beloved fire of the corn - feast ; By the Arrow of Lightning , that came from the storm , From the Spirit of Fire to the ancient chief of the YemasseeTotem of Yemassee !

The Yemassee Lands


The History of Beaufort County South Carolina 1514 1861

Learning that eight to ten Yemassee war canoes had come up the inland passage from Georgia and were in the Port Royal area , Fenwick , Stone , Palmer , and Burroughs proceeded with their small fleet to the southern tip of Daufuskie ...

The History of Beaufort County  South Carolina  1514 1861

The complex, colorful history of South Carolina's southeastern corner.

The Simms Reader

By the author of “ The Yemassee , " " Guy Rivers , ” & c . New York : Harper & Brothers , 1836. 2 vols . No dedication ; 1854 Redfield edition has dedication to Colonel M. C. M Hammond . Martin Faber , The Story of a Criminal ...

The Simms Reader

Long considered a leading literary figure of the Old South, William Gilmore Simms (1806-1870) wrote letters, novels, short fiction, drama, essays, and poetry in his prolific career. Born in Charleston to an old South Carolina family of modest means and raised by a grandmother with whom his father left him after his mother's death, Simms felt a simultaneous sense of loyalty to and alienation from his native region. He was a major intellectual figure on the East Coast before the Civil War but saw his New York publishers abandon him after secession, of which he was a vocal supporter. Simms's novels and poetry have been published in modern editions, and he has been the subject of numerous biographies and critical studies, but until now there has been no collection covering the broad spectrum of his writings. The Simms Reader presents a selection of his nonnovelistic work--letters, short fiction, essays, historical writings, poetry, and epigrams--chosen and introduced by the preeminent Simms scholar John Caldwell Guilds.

Simms a Literary Life p

Dedication to Charles R. Carroll, Esq. The Yemassee. A Romance of Carolina. By the author of "Guy Rivers," "Martin Faber," &c. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1835. Two volumes. Dedication to Samuel Henry Dickson, M.D. The Partisan: A Tale ...

Simms  a Literary Life  p

Encompasses ante-colonial America, the English colonies, the Revolutionary War, and the rampaging frontier and constitutes a unique national literary treasure. Guilds's Simms restores Simms to his proper place as a major figure in American letters and reintroduces the man and the author to the reading public.

FOREIGN VOICES

In fact, his reputation might have exceeded Cooper's, were it not for the latter's sizeable repertoire, combined with the fact that Simms's modern reputation is based almost entirely on a single historical novel, The Yemassee: a Romance ...

FOREIGN VOICES

"Today's fiction is increasingly populated by multilingual urban societies in all their rich cultural variety," contends Bernard Botes Krüger, making a persuasive case that "readers need to 'hear' authentic sounding dialogue from the mouths of foreign-language characters-something which mere translations into standard English can never adequately accomplish." The concept of foreign-language dialogue in fiction is not new; many accomplished authors of the past have used a variety of subtle techniques to help their readers understand instances of 'foreign' dialogue. However, those techinues have never been thoroughly isolated and examined-until now. Using Britain's 'Colonial Era' literature as a starting point in this work, the author discusses and systematically catagorizes every type of 'device' used in the past, assembling in the process a veritible toolbox of techniques which aspiring writers can implement to enrich their multilingual dialogue.

Reading William Gilmore Simms

He knew all this before he sat down to write the bulk of The Yemassee in the summer and fall of 1834. To write out of his native history obliged him to include the history of earlier South Carolina natives—the Yemassee among them—in ...

Reading William Gilmore Simms

William Gilmore Simms was the best known and certainly the most accomplished writer of the mid-nineteenth-century South. His literary ascent began early, with his first book being published when he was nineteen years old and his reputation as a literary genius secured before he turned thirty. Over a career that spanned nearly forty-five years, he established himself as the American South's premier man of letters—an accomplished poet, novelist, short fiction writer, essayist, historian, dramatist, cultural journalist, biographer, and editor. In Reading William Gilmore Simms, Todd Hagstette has created an anthology of critical introductions to Simms's major publications, including those recently brought back into print by the University of South Carolina Press, offering the first ever primer compendium of the author's vast output. Simms was a Renaissance man of American letters, lauded in his time by both popular audiences and literary icons alike. Yet the author's extensive output, which includes nearly eighty published volumes, can be a barrier to his study. To create a gateway to reading and studying Simms, Hagstette has assembled thirty-eight essays by twenty-four scholars to review fifty-five Simms works. Addressing all the author's major works, the essays provide introductory information and scholarly analysis of the most crucial features of Simms's literary achievement. Arranged alphabetically by title for easy access, the book also features a topical index for more targeted inquiry into Simms's canon. Detailing the great variety and astonishing consistency of Simms's thought throughout his long career as well as examining his posthumous reconsideration, Reading William Gilmore Simms bridges the author's genius and readers' growing curiosity. The only work of its kind, this book provides an essential passport to the far-flung worlds of Simms's fecund imagination.

Renaissance in Charleston

Much attention has been given , deservedly , to the three Yemassee poems— " The Yemassee Lands , " " The Alligator , " and " The Arrow of Lightning . " These poems are all related thematically to the Native American tribe , the Yemassee ...

Renaissance in Charleston

"The essays tell how these and other individuals faced the tensions and contradictions of their time and place. While some traced their lineage back to the city's first families, others were relative newcomers. Some broke new ground racially and sexually as well as artistically; others perpetuated the myths of the Old South. Some were censured at home but praised in New York, London, and Paris. The essays also underscore the significance and growth of such cultural institutions as the Poetry Society of South Carolina, the Charleston Museum, and the Gibbes Art Gallery."--BOOK JACKET.

The South in the Building of the Nation

“ Occonestoga is the brave of the Yemassee , " exclaimed the young Echotee , while the eyes of the captive looked what his lips could not have said . " Occonestoga is a brave of the Yemassee — he is no dog of Malatchie .

The South in the Building of the Nation

In 1900, there was a general agreement among Southerners on the need for a comprehensive history of the Southern states. It had been and was a nation, sharing beliefs, traditions, and culture. This series, originally published in 1909, is a record of the South's part in the making of the American nation. It portrays the character, the genius, the achievements, and the progress in the life of the Southern people. The South's rich folklore and strong oral history inspired a literary tradition as distinguished as any in the nation. This volume celebrates many great authors, such as Edgar Allan Poe, Joel Chandler Harris, and George Washington Cable, who are still widely read today. Less familiar to the modern reader, the works of William Gilmore Simms, John Pendleton Kennedy, and Thomas Nelson Page are placed in their correct historical context. The contributions of women writers are well represented by Ellen Glasgow, Grace Elizabeth King, and others. This volume features a comprehensive introductory essay, followed by numerous excerpts. Many complete short stories are included, for example, Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher."

Simms Works

But he speaks out of his own heart — and does not speak to the heart of the traitor The Yemassee will all say for Echotee , but who can say for Occonestoga when Sanutee himself is silent ? Does the Yemassee speak with a double tongue ?

Simms  Works


The Prince of Tides

The town was built on the land of the Yemassee Indians , and it was considered a mark of eminence that there was not a single Yemassee remaining on earth . Yemassee was a word that shimmered with the dark luster of extinction .

The Prince of Tides

Interweaves the events of Tom Wingo's summer in New York and his relationship to Susan Lowenstein, his sister Savannah's beautiful psychiatrist and the complex history of the South Carolinian Wingo family, from World War II, through Vietnam

A New Literary History of America

porally backward or spatially westward to restore contact with “the Indian as our ancestors knew him early, and as our people, in certain situations, may know him still,” as Simms wrote in The Yemassee. Indians are more than worthy ...

A New Literary History of America

Traces the dynamic expression of the American experience and how the nation's sense of identity offers alternate perspectives into history, in an anthology that also explores modern cultural creations in a range of disciplines.

Muting White Noise

Though Harrison is willing to kill to clear the landscape of “savages” for his people, he now also can claim a birthright to the Yemassee homeland. In this novel, a Yemassee mother transfers her son's Yemassee identity, and by extension ...

Muting White Noise

Native American fiction writers have confronted Euro-American narratives about Indians and the colonial world those narratives help create. These Native authors offer stories in which Indians remake this colonial world by resisting conquest and assimilation, sustaining their cultures and communities, and surviving. In Muting White Noise, James H. Cox considers how Native authors have liberated our imaginations from colonial narratives. Cox takes his title from Sherman Alexie, for whom the white noise of a television set represents the white mass-produced culture that mutes American Indian voices. Cox foregrounds the work of Native intellectuals in his readings of the American Indian novel tradition. He thereby develops a critical perspective from which to re-see the role played by the Euro-American novel tradition in justifying and enabling colonialism. By examining novels by Native authors—especially Thomas King, Gerald Vizenor, and Alexie—Cox shows how these writers challenge and revise colonizers’ tales about Indians. He then offers “red readings” of some revered Euro-American novels, including Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick, and shows that until quite recently, even those non-Native storytellers who sympathized with Indians could imagine only their vanishing by story’s end. Muting White Noise breaks new ground in literary criticism. It stands with Native authors in their struggle to reclaim their own narrative space and tell stories that empower and nurture, rather than undermine and erase, American Indians and their communities.

History s Lost Moments

Regrettably, the Port Royal Scots saw an excellent opportunity to mix politics and commerce as powerful elixer for controlling the Yemassee Indians who roamed the lower coastal third of Carolina.

History s Lost Moments

Dr. Tom Horton writes history in the same folksy manner that he's known for across the state in his banquet addresses. The stories he tells are the ones that he heard from the old folks as he was growing up partly on the Lowcountry coast and partly in the Upstate. Few people know the lore of South Carolina as well as he does, and no one can tell the stories better than he! Volume III continues in the same tradition as he began in Volumes I and II. There's more to come!

The Word in Black and White

The opening pages of The Yemassee provide readers with a historical sketch of the Yemassee tribe. This passage is marked with frequent footnotes, the first of which sets an undeniable tone of authority: “We are speaking now of authentic ...

The Word in Black and White

Nelson provides a study of the ways in which Anglo-American authors constructed "race" in their works from the time of the first British colonists through the period of the Civil War. She focuses on some eleven texts, ranging from widely-known to little-considered, that deal with the relations among Native, African, and Anglo-Americans, and places her readings in the historical, social, and material contexts of an evolving U.S. colonialism and internal imperialism. Nelson shows how a novel such as The Last of the Mohicans sought to reify the Anglo historical past and simultaneously suggested strategies that would serve Anglo-Americans against Native Americans as the frontier pushed further west. Concluding her work with a reading of Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Nelson shows how that text undercuts the racist structures of the pre-Civil War period by positing a revised model of sympathy that authorizes alternative cultural perspectives and requires Anglo-Americans to question their own involvement with racism.

The American Monthly Magazine

The Yemassee , the most powerful tribe of the time and coun . try , partly in consequence of the aggressions of the Carolinians , and partly at the instigation of the Spaniards , who then held Florida , have become discontented ...

The American Monthly Magazine