The Zen Teaching of Homeless Kodo

His teachings are short, sharp, and powerful. Always clear, often funny, and sometimes uncomfortably close to home, they jolt us into awakening. Kosho Uchiyama expands and explains his teacher's wisdom with his commentary.

The Zen Teaching of Homeless Kodo

Abandon your treasured delusions and hit the road with one of the most important Zen masters of twentieth-century Japan. Eschewing the entrapments of vanity, power, and money, "Homeless" Kodo Sawaki Roshi refused to accept a permanent position as a temple abbot, despite repeated offers. Instead, he lived a traveling, "homeless" life, going from temple to temple, student to student, teaching and instructing and never allowing himself to stray from his chosen path. He is responsible for making Soto Zen available to the common people outside of monasteries. His teachings are short, sharp, and powerful. Always clear, often funny, and sometimes uncomfortably close to home, they jolt us into awakening. Kosho Uchiyama expands and explains his teacher's wisdom with his commentary. Trained in Western philosophy, he draws parallels between Zen teachings and the Bible, Descartes, and Pascal. Shohaku Okumura has also added his own commentary, grounding his teachers' power and sagacity for the contemporary, Western practitioner. Experience the timeless, practical wisdom of three generations of Zen masters.

Zen Teaching of Homeless Kodo

—Melissa Myozen Blacker, coeditor of The Bookof Mu “To Kodo Sawaki, 'homelessness' was more than not having a temple ora house;it describedhow life is: '. ..all human beingswithout exception are in reality homeless.' In The Zen Teaching ...

Zen Teaching of Homeless Kodo

Abandon your treasured delusions and hit the road with one of the most important Zen masters of twentieth-century Japan. Eschewing the entrapments of vanity, power, and money, "Homeless" Kodo Sawaki Roshi refused to accept a permanent position as a temple abbot, despite repeated offers. Instead, he lived a traveling, "homeless" life, going from temple to temple, student to student, teaching and instructing and never allowing himself to stray from his chosen path. He is responsible for making Soto Zen available to the common people outside of monasteries. His teachings are short, sharp, and powerful. Always clear, often funny, and sometimes uncomfortably close to home, they jolt us into awakening. Kosho Uchiyama expands and explains his teacher's wisdom with his commentary. Trained in Western philosophy, he draws parallels between Zen teachings and the Bible, Descartes, and Pascal. Shohaku Okumura has also added his own commentary, grounding his teachers’ power and sagacity for the contemporary, Western practitioner. Experience the timeless, practical wisdom of three generations of Zen masters.

To You

In this book, hundreds of pith sayings taken from his wide-ranging teachings have been carefully compiled and grouped according to subject by one of his closest students.

To You

Kodo Sawaki Roshi [1880â€"1965] was commonly referred to as “Homeless Kodo†due to his nomadic lifestyle. In the tradition of Soto Zen, which emphasizes zazen (sitting meditation practice) above the use of texts and koans, he is one of the most influential teachers of the twentieth century. In this book, hundreds of pith sayings taken from his wide-ranging teachings have been carefully compiled and grouped according to subject by one of his closest students. The reader is easily struck by Sawakiâ€(TM)s sincerity, depth and directness. What comes across so immediately is his uncompromising dedication to zazen and his determination to transmit an authentic practice. This he does by pointing out, with biting accuracy, the many pitfalls we “ordinary humans†stumble into. His teaching is at the same time both completely faithful to the Buddhist ancestors and absolutely relevant to our many modern predicaments. Are you worried about your career? Fighting with your spouse? Concerned about money? Complaining about how busy you are? Homeless Kodo has a piece of advice for you. Kodo Sawaki Roshi also has an appeal to those who are decidedly irreligious, in his irreverence and criticism of hollow traditions. He ruthlessly challenges political and societal conformity, consistently referring his readers back to the essence tenets of zen. Very few of his works have been translated into European languages. Of all his books, perhaps it is this one, To You, (enthusiastically received in both French and German) which best captures his contribution to the tradition. While Kodo Sawaki R� shi is still a lesser-known teacher in the West, some of his disciples, most notably K� sh� Uchiyama R� shi (who collected these sayings) and Taisen Deshimaru R� shi both had many Western disciples, who in turn have brought the practice to literally hundreds of centers and thousands of practitioners in North America, South America and Europe. This English-language version is a joint effort by a distinguished team of Zen practitioners and translators: Muho Noelke and Reih� Jesse Haasch. Muho previously translated the Japanese version into German, and is the first Westerner to hold the post as abbot of a major Japanese Zen monastery, Antaiji. There, Kodo Sawaki himself also served as the abbot from 1949 until his death in 1965.

Mind Sky

Nothing can disturb that all-encompassing vastness. This is the Dharma". In a collection of talks and anecdotes, Jakusho Kwong-roshi, a Dharma successor of Shunryu Suzuki-roshi, presents his approach to Buddhist teaching.

Mind Sky

A collection of talks, photos, and calligraphy by Jakusho Kwong-roshi, exploring the profound beauty of Zen history and practice, nature, and the philosophy of the ancient Zen master Eihei Dogen. “In Zen meditation, anything that comes in your mind will eventually leave, because nothing is permanent. A thought is like a cloud moving across the blue sky. Nothing can disturb that all-encompassing vastness. This is the Dharma". In a collection of talks and anecdotes, Jakusho Kwong-roshi, a Dharma successor of Shunryu Suzuki-roshi, presents his approach to Buddhist teaching. Containing photos of Kwong-roshi with his teachers, as well as a selection of his vibrant calligraphy, Mind Sky explores the profound beauty of Zen history and practice, nature, and the philosophy of the ancient Zen master Eihei Dogen. With an elegant simplicity, Jakusho Kwong-roshi shows how Zen is experiential rather than intellectual. And with persistent practice, realization is already yours.

Living by Vow

A Sot Zen priest and Dharma successor of Kosho Uchiyama Roshi explores eight of Zen's most essential and universal liturgical texts and explains how the chants in these works support meditation and promote a life of freedom and compassion.

Living by Vow

A Sot Zen priest and Dharma successor of Kosho Uchiyama Roshi explores eight of Zen's most essential and universal liturgical texts and explains how the chants in these works support meditation and promote a life of freedom and compassion.

Opening the Hand of Thought

In a thorough introduction to Zen tenets and practice, the authors reveal how Zen Buddhism can become a lifelong path of spiritual development and inquiry. Original.

Opening the Hand of Thought

In a thorough introduction to Zen tenets and practice, the authors reveal how Zen Buddhism can become a lifelong path of spiritual development and inquiry. Original.

Black to Nature

Kosho Uchiyama Roshi and Shohaku Okamura, The Zen Teaching of Homeless Kodo, ed. Jokei Molly Delight Whitehead (Somerville, MA: Wisdom, 1981), loc. 332. 79. Roshi, Zen Teaching of Homeless Kodo, loc. 541. 80. This is important because ...

Black to Nature

In Black to Nature: Pastoral Return and African American Culture, author Stefanie K. Dunning considers both popular and literary texts that range from Beyoncé’s Lemonade to Jesmyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones. These key works restage Black women in relation to nature. Dunning argues that depictions of protagonists who return to pastoral settings contest the violent and racist history that incentivized Black disavowal of the natural world. Dunning offers an original theoretical paradigm for thinking through race and nature by showing that diverse constructions of nature in these texts are deployed as a means of rescrambling the teleology of the Western progress narrative. In a series of fascinating close readings of contemporary Black texts, she reveals how a range of artists evoke nature to suggest that interbeing with nature signals a call for what Jared Sexton calls “the dream of Black Studies”—abolition. Black to Nature thus offers nuanced readings that advance an emerging body of critical and creative work at the nexus of Blackness, gender, and nature. Written in a clear, approachable, and multilayered style that aims to be as poignant as nature itself, the volume offers a unique combination of theoretical breadth, narrative beauty, and broader perspective that suggests it will be a foundational text in a new critical turn towards framing nature within a cultural studies context.

The Mountains and Waters Sutra

Throughout this luminous volume, we learn how we can live in harmony with nature in respect and gratitude—and awaken to our true nature.

The Mountains and Waters Sutra

An indispensable map of a classic Zen text. “Mountains and waters are the expression of old buddhas.” So begins “Sansuikyo,” or “Mountains and Waters Sutra,” a masterpiece of poetry and insight from Eihei Dogen, the thirteenth-century founder of the Soto school of Zen. Shohaku Okumura—renowned for his translations of and magisterial teachings on Dogen—guides the reader through the rich layers of metaphor and meaning in “Sansuikyo,” which is often thought to be the most beautiful essay in Dogen’s monumental Shobogenzo. His wise and friendly voice shows us the questions Dogen poses and helps us realize what the answers could be. What does it mean for mountains to walk? How are mountains an expression of Buddha’s truth, and how can we learn to hear the deep teachings of river waters? Throughout this luminous volume, we learn how we can live in harmony with nature in respect and gratitude—and awaken to our true nature.

TO YOU

In this book, hundreds of pith sayings taken from his wide-ranging teachings have been carefully compiled and grouped according to subject by one of his closest students.

TO YOU

Kodo Sawaki Roshi [1880–1965] was commonly referred to as “Homeless Kodo” due to his nomadic lifestyle. In the tradition of Soto Zen, which emphasizes zazen (sitting meditation practice) above the use of texts and koans, he is one of the most influential teachers of the twentieth century. In this book, hundreds of pith sayings taken from his wide-ranging teachings have been carefully compiled and grouped according to subject by one of his closest students. The reader is easily struck by Sawaki’s sincerity, depth and directness. What comes across so immediately is his uncompromising dedication to zazen and his determination to transmit an authentic practice. This he does by pointing out, with biting accuracy, the many pitfalls we “ordinary humans” stumble into. His teaching is at the same time both completely faithful to the Buddhist ancestors and absolutely relevant to our many modern predicaments. Are you worried about your career? Fighting with your spouse? Concerned about money? Complaining about how busy you are? Homeless Kodo has a piece of advice for you. Kodo Sawaki Roshi also has an appeal to those who are decidedly irreligious, in his irreverence and criticism of hollow traditions. He ruthlessly challenges political and societal conformity, consistently referring his readers back to the essence tenets of zen. Very few of his works have been translated into European languages. Of all his books, perhaps it is this one, To You, (enthusiastically received in both French and German) which best captures his contribution to the tradition. While Kodo Sawaki Rōshi is still a lesser-known teacher in the West, some of his disciples, most notably Kōshō Uchiyama Rōshi (who collected these sayings) and Taisen Deshimaru Rōshi both had many Western disciples, who in turn have brought the practice to literally hundreds of centers and thousands of practitioners in North America, South America and Europe. This English-language version is a joint effort by a distinguished team of Zen practitioners and translators: Muho Noelke and Reihō Jesse Haasch. Muho previously translated the Japanese version into German, and is the first Westerner to hold the post as abbot of a major Japanese Zen monastery, Antaiji. There, Kodo Sawaki himself also served as the abbot from 1949 until his death in 1965

A Bird in Flight Leaves No Trace

The Zen Teaching of Homeless Kodo Kodo Sawaki Commentary by Shohaku Okumura and Kosho Uchiyama “Kodo Sawaki was straight-to-the-point, irreverent, and deeply insightful—and of the most influential Zen teachers for us in the West.

A Bird in Flight Leaves No Trace

Penetrate the nature of mind with this contemporary Korean take on a classic of Zen literature. The message of the Tang-dynasty Zen text in this volume seems simple: to gain enlightenment, stop thinking there is something you need to practice. For the Chinese master Huangbo Xiyun (d. 850), the mind is enlightenment itself if we can only let go of our normal way of thinking. The celebrated translation of this work by John Blofeld, The Zen Teaching of Huang Po, introduced countless readers to Zen over the last sixty years. Huangbo’s work is also a favorite of contemporary Zen (Korean: Seon) Master Subul, who has revolutionized the strict monastic practice of koans and adapted it for lay meditators in Korea and around the world to make swift progress in intense but informal retreats. Devoting themselves to enigmatic questions with their whole bodies, retreatants are frustrated in their search for answers and arrive thereby at a breakthrough experience of their own buddha nature. A Bird in Flight Leaves No Trace is a bracing call for the practitioner to let go and thinking and unlock the buddha within.

Zen Bridge

The Zen Teaching of Homeless Kodo Kosho Uchiyama and Shohaku Okumura Edited by Molly Delight Whitehead “Kodo Sawaki was straight-to-the-point, irreverent, and deeply insightful—and one of the most influential Zen teachers for us in the ...

Zen Bridge

A funny, poignant, and illuminating masterclass on Zen philosophy and practice from a beloved teacher. Zen Bridge collects Dharma talks given by the Zen master Keido Fukushima Roshi. Fukushima Roshi's anecdotes on his own training are humble, hilarious, and full of wisdom. His reflections on classical teachings intermingle with personal stories, allowing them to be accessible to all readers while at the same time transcendent. The power and authenticity of this true Zen master shines through in his words. This book includes black and white illustrations of basic sitting and hand posture for meditation as well as selections of Fukushima Roshi's calligraphy.

Discovering the True Self

Kodo Sawaki was one of the greatest and most influential Zen teachers of the twentieth century. ... —SHOHAKU OKUMURA, translator of Zen Teaching of Homeless Kodo “Philippe ReiRyu Coupey, in his new commentary on the Shinjinmei (In the ...

Discovering the True Self

These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly). “You can’t see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen.” Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji’s teaching and he knew how to express Dogen’s philosophy in clear, easily–understood language. Sawaki’s primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation. His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen’s Shobogenzo. A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki’s writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki’s teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.

Hardcore Zen

The Zen Teaching of Homeless Kodo Kosho Uchiyama and Shohaku Okumura “Kodo Sawaki was straight-to-the-point, irreverent, and deeply insightful—and one of the most influential Zen teachers for us in the West. I'm very happy to see this ...

Hardcore Zen

Zen, plain and simple, with no BS. This is not your typical Zen book. Brad Warner, a young punk who grew up to be a Zen master, spares no one. This bold new approach to the "Why?" of Zen Buddhism is as strongly grounded in the tradition of Zen as it is utterly revolutionary. Warner's voice is hilarious, and he calls on the wisdom of everyone from punk and pop culture icons to the Buddha himself to make sure his points come through loud and clear. As it prods readers to question everything, Hardcore Zen is both an approach and a departure, leaving behind the soft and lyrical for the gritty and stark perspective of a new generation. This new edition will feature an afterword from the author.

Dogen s Pure Standards for the Zen Community

The Holy Teachings of Vimalakirti : A Mahayana Scripture . University Park : Pennsylvania State University Press , 1976 . Uchiyama , Kōshō . The Zen Teaching of “ HomelessKōdō . Trans . by Kōshi Ichida and Shohaku Okumura .

Dogen s Pure Standards for the Zen Community

Presents a complete, annotated translation of Dogen's writing on Zen monasticism and the spirit of community practice. Dogen (1200-1253) is Japan's greatest Zen master.

Handbook of Zen Mindfulness and Behavioral Health

Furthermore, benevolence, compassion, and humanity as core values are not limited to Zen or Buddhism. ... Secrets of the Blue Criff Record: Zen comments by Hakuin and Tenkei. Boston, MA: Shambhala. ... The Zen teaching of homeless Kodo.

Handbook of Zen  Mindfulness  and Behavioral Health

This comprehensive handbook presents a Zen account of fundamental and important dimensions of daily living. It explores how Zen teachings inform a range of key topics across the field of behavioral health and discuss the many uses of meditation and mindfulness practice in therapeutic contexts, especially within cognitive-behavioral therapies. Chapters outline key Zen constructs of self and body, desire, and acceptance, and apply these constructs to Western frameworks of health, pathology, meaning-making, and healing. An interdisciplinary panel of experts, including a number of Zen masters who have achieved the designation of roshi, examines intellectual tensions among Zen, mindfulness, and psychotherapy, such as concepts of rationality, modes of language, and goals of well-being. The handbook also offers first-person practitioner accounts of living Zen in everyday life and using its teachings in varied practice settings. Topics featured in the Handbook include: • Zen practices in jails.• Zen koans and parables.• A Zen account of desire and attachment.• Adaptation of Zen to behavioral healthcare.• Zen, mindfulness, and their relationship to cognitive behavioral therapy. • The application of Zen practices and principles for survivors of trauma and violence. The Handbook of Zen, Mindfulness, and Behavioral Health is a must-have resource for researchers, clinicians/professionals, and graduate students in clinical psychology, public health, cultural studies, language philosophy, behavioral medicine, and Buddhism and religious studies.

Great Doubt

John Daishin Buksbazen, author of Zen Meditation in Plain English The Zen Teaching of Homeless Kodo Shohaku Okumura and Kosho Uchiyama Edited by Molly Delight Whitehead “Kodo Sawaki was straight-to-the-point, irreverent, ...

Great Doubt

Intro -- Title -- Table of Contents -- Foreword by Brad Warner -- Introduction -- TRANSLATION -- Exhortations for Those Who Don't Rouse Doubt -- Exhortations for Those Who Rouse Doubt -- COMMENTARY -- A Commentary on Exhortations for Those Who Don't Rouse Doubt -- A Commentary on Exhortations for Those Who Rouse Doubt -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- About the Author -- Also Available from Wisdom Publications -- About Wisdom Publications -- Copyright

Women Living Zen

Uchiyama Köshō , The Zen Teachings of “ HomelessKõdo ( Kyoto : Kyoto Sõtő Zen Center , 1990 ) , p . 150 . 9. This is a striking example of Dōgen's understanding of sufficiency , since water was abundant in the regions where he lived ...

Women Living Zen

Although many Buddhists have made concessions to contradictory religious and social expectations during the twentieth century, these Zen nuns spent much of the century advancing their traditional monastic values by fighting for and winning reforms of the sect's misogynist regulations."--BOOK JACKET.

Deepest Practice Deepest Wisdom

Like all masterful commentaries, this one finds in the few short lines of the text the entire span of the Buddhist teachings.”—Buddhadharma: The Buddhist Review The Zen Teaching of Homeless Kōdō Kōshō Uchiyama and Shōhaku Okumura “Kōdō ...

Deepest Practice  Deepest Wisdom

Insightful commentary on a beloved ancient philosopher of Zen by a beloved contemporary master of Zen. Famously insightful and famously complex, Eihei Dogen’s writings have been studied and puzzled over for hundreds of years. In Deepest Practice, Deepest Wisdom, Kosho Uchiyama, beloved twentieth-century Zen teacher addresses himself head-on to unpacking Dogen’s wisdom from three fascicles (or chapters) of his monumental Shobogenzo for a modern audience. The fascicles presented here from Shobogenzo, or Treasury of the True Dharma Eye include “Shoaku Makusa” or “Refraining from Evil,” “Maka Hannya Haramitsu” or “Practicing Deepest Wisdom,” and “Uji” or “Living Time.” Tom Wright and Shohaku Okumura lovingly translate Dogen’s penetrating words and Uchiyama’s thoughtful commentary on each piece. At turns poetic and funny, always insightful, this is Zen wisdom for the ages.

Dogen s Shobogenzo Zuimonki

The Zen Teaching of Homeless Kodo. Somerville, MA: Wisdom Publications, 2014. Waddell, Norman, and Masao Abe. The Heart of Dōgen's Shōbōgenzō. New York: State University of New York Press, 2002. Yoshida, Rosan Osamu (吉田収魯参), trans.

Dogen s Shobogenzo Zuimonki

"This text consists of Master Dōgen's own words, albeit through the filter of his Dharma successor, Koun Ejō, who wrote down the spoken words of his teacher. The title of the text, Shōbōgenzō Zuimonki, can be translated as "True Dharma Eye Treasury: Record of Things Heard." It also distinct from Dōgen's magnum opus (called just Shōbōgenzō) in that it consists of relatively straightforward and accessible teachings, making more limited use of the allusion, word-play, and metaphor that characterize the essays that comprise Shōbōgenzō. Record of Things Heard can be read as a highly practical manual of Buddhist practice, essentially a primer of Sōtō Zen. Dōgen's words express fundamental aspects of Buddhist practice in terms that are both concrete and straightforward in Japanese society in the thirteenth century. Among the many topics covered, Dōgen especially emphasizes the following points: seeing impermanence, departing from the ego-centered self, being free from greed, giving up self-attachment, following the guidance of a true teacher, and the practice of zazen, specifically shikantaza, or "just sitting". Record of Things Heard is a bilingual edition with extensive notes which help to provide the reader with a new way of approaching the text. As bonus material, this edition also includes translations and commentary of Dōgen's luminously evocative waka poetry, formerly published under the title White Snow on Bright Leaves. The book also includes a selection of Dogen's waka poetry with commentary"--

Zen and the Heart of Psychotherapy

2 Sawaki Kodo Roshi , quoted in K. Uchiyama Roshi , The Zen Teaching of " Homeless " Kodo . Kyoto , Japan : Kyoto Soto Zen Center , c / o Sosenji , 1990 . 3 This is a koan , the seventh case in a famous collection of Zen koans called ...

Zen and the Heart of Psychotherapy

Written with the practitioner in mind, this concise, useful overview of the theory and practice of Alfred Adler's Individual Psychology explains the dimensions and uses of natural and logical consequences - the bases of Adlerian/Individual Psychology. Now entering its fourth edition, Adlerian Counseling has withstood the test of time thanks to its practical approach and its coverage of a variety of settings (school, home, community, business) and populations (children, adolescents, adults).