ספר הזהר

ספר הזהר

This third volume of completes the Zohar's commentary on the book of Genesis. Throughout, the Zohar probes the biblical text and seeks deeper meaning--for example, the divine intention behind Joseph's disappearance, or the profound significance of human sexuality.

Studies in the Zohar

Studies in the Zohar

This book deals with the “Book of Splendor” (Sefer ha-Zohar), the greatest achievement of Kabbalah and one of the most influential sources of Western mysticism. This book offers a new interpretation of the Zohar, analyzing both its theoretical content and its historical context; it also brings the theory and the history together by indicating the personal and autobiographical elements in the Zohar’s teachings. The author delves into the issues of the messianic elements of the Zohar, the way it was written, and its relationship to Christianity, Gnosticism, and Talmudic literature.

A Guide to the Zohar

A Guide to the Zohar

Please see the Zohar Home Page for ancillary materials, including the publication schedule, press release, Aramaic text, questions, and answers.

The Zohar

The Zohar

The wisdom of Kabbalah teaches us how to perceive and live in the reality that spreads before us. It is a systematic method that has evolved over thousands of years, nurtured by individuals whose task was to ensure that the true wisdom would be given to those ready to receive it. The Book of Zohar (The Book of Radiance) is an ageless source of wisdom and the basis for all Kabbalistic literature. Since its appearance nearly 2,000 years ago, it has been the primary, and often only, source used by Kabbalists. Written in a unique and metaphorical language. The Book of Zohar enriches our understanding of reality and expands our worldview. However, this text should not be read in an ordinary fashion. We should patiently and repeatedly read and think about each sentence as we try to penetrate the author's feelings. We should read it slowly and try to extract the nuances of the text. Although the text deals with one subject only-how to relate to the Creator-it approaches it from different angles. This allows each of us to find the particular phrase or word that will carry us into the depths of this profound and timeless wisdom.

The Secret History of the Zohar

The Secret History of the Zohar

An overview of the "Zohar," or "Book of Splendor," begins with Moses and continues through the present day, and shows its connection with events and such great historical figures as Plato, Sir Isaac Newton, and the Knights Templar.

The Zohar, volume 1

The Zohar, volume 1

The first two volumes of The Zohar: Pritzker Edition, translated with commentary by Daniel C. Matt, cover more than half of the Zohar's commentary on the Book of Genesis (through Genesis 32:3). This is the first translation ever made from a critical Aramaic text of the Zohar, which has been established by Professor Matt based on a wide range of original manuscripts. The extensive commentary, appearing at the bottom of each page, clarifies the kabbalistic symbolism and terminology, and cites sources and parallels from biblical, rabbinic, and kabbalistic texts. The translator's introduction is accompanied by a second introduction written by Arthur Green, discussing the origin and significance of the Zohar. Please see the Zohar Home Page for ancillary materials, including the publication schedule, press release, Aramaic text, questions, and answers. Further information on the Zohar: Sefer ha-Zohar, "The Book of Radiance," has amazed and overwhelmed readers ever since it emerged mysteriously in medieval Spain toward the end of the thirteenth century. Written in a unique Aramaic, this masterpiece of Kabbalah exceeds the dimensions of a normal book; it is virtually a body of literature, comprising over twenty discrete sections. The bulk of the Zohar consists of a running commentary on the Torah, from Genesis through Deuteronomy. This translation begins and focuses here in what are projected to be ten volumes. Two subsequent volumes will cover other, shorter sections. The Zohar's commentary is composed in the form of a mystical novel. The hero is Rabbi Shim'on son of Yohai, a saintly disciple of Rabbi Akiva who lived in the second century in the land of Israel. In the Zohar, Rabbi Shim'on and his companions wander through the hills of Galilee, discovering and sharing secrets of Torah. On one level, biblical figures such as Abraham and Sarah are the main characters, and the mystical companions interpret their words, actions, and personalities. On a deeper level, the text of the Bible is simply the starting point, a springboard for the imagination. For example, when God commands Abraham, Lekh lekha, Go forth... to the land that I will show you (Genesis 12:1), Rabbi El'azar ignores idiomatic usage and insists on reading the words more literally than they were intended, hyperliterally: Lekh lekha, Go to yourself! Search deep within to discover your true self. At times, the companions themselves become the main characters, and we read about their dramatic mystical sessions with Rabbi Shim'on or their adventures on the road, for example, an encounter with a cantankerous old donkey driver who turns out to be a master of wisdom in disguise. Ultimately, the plot of the Zohar focuses on the ten sefirot, the various stages of God's inner life, aspects of divine personality, both feminine and masculine. By penetrating the literal surface of the Torah, the mystical commentators transform the biblical narrative into a biography of God. The entire Torah is read as one continuous divine name, expressing divine being. Even a seemingly insignificant verse can reveal the inner dynamics of the sefirot—how God feels, responds and acts, how She and He (the divine feminine and masculine) relate intimately with each other and with the world.

Unlocking the Zohar

Unlocking the Zohar

The Book of Zohar (Book of Radiance), also known as The Zohar is one of the most mysterious and misunderstood compositions ever written. The awe, admiration, and even fear it has evoked over the years are unsurpassed. This book contains the secrets of the whole of Creation, but until recently these secrets were shrouded in a cloud of mystery and misconceptions. Now The Zohar is openly unfolding its wisdom throughout the world, to show humanity a way forward, as the book itself declares (VaYera, Item 460), When the days of the Messiah draw near, even infants will discover the secrets of the wisdom. The greatest Kabbalist of the 20th century, Rav Yehuda Ashlag (1884-1954) paved a new way for us by which we can reveal the secrets of The Zohar. He wrote the Sulam [Ladder] Commentary and the four introductions for The Zohar to help us come to know the forces that govern our lives, and teach us how we can assume control over our destinies. This book is an invitation to a wondrous journey to a higher world. The author, Kabbalist Dr Michael Laitman, wisely ushers us into the revelations of the Sulam commentary. In so doing, Laitman helps us fine-tune our thoughts as we read in The Zohar, to maximize the spiritual benefit derived from reading it. In addition to explaining The Book of Zohar, the book contains numerous inspiring quotes from The Zohar, specifically translated, edited, and compiled for easy reading and understanding of this powerful text.

The Zohar

the first ever unabridged English translation with commentary. Chayei Sarah, Toldot

The Zohar


Reading the Zohar

The Sacred Text of the Kabbalah

Reading the Zohar

Comprising well over a thousand pages of densely written Aramaic, the compilation of texts known as the Zohar represents the collective wisdom of various strands of Jewish mysticism, or kabbalah, up to the thirteenth century. This massive work continues to provide the foundation of much Jewish mystical thought and practice to the present day. In this book, Pinchas Giller examines certaing sections of the Zohar and the ways in which the central doctrines of classical kabbalah took shape around them.