Things That Are Most in the World

A collection of superlatives showcases such outrageous figures as an ice-skating snake, a wind-surfing ant, a chicken in a frog's costume, and a pepperoni pizza-eating dragon. This is John Nickle's first book for children.

Things That Are Most in the World

A collection of superlatives showcases such outrageous figures as an ice-skating snake, a wind-surfing ant, a chicken in a frog's costume, and a pepperoni pizza-eating dragon.

Things That Are Most in the World

A collection of superlatives showcases such outrageous figures as an ice-skating snake, a wind-surfing ant, a chicken in a frog's costume, and a pepperoni pizza-eating dragon.

Things That Are Most in the World

A collection of superlatives showcases such outrageous figures as an ice-skating snake, a wind-surfing ant, a chicken in a frog's costume, and a pepperoni pizza-eating dragon.

The 100 Most Pointless Things in the World

THINGS THAT PRETENI] THEY ARE CRAIIY BUT AREN'T Can I be frank with
you? I'd like to think I can, as we're now approaching the middle of the book, and
especially since you've probably read the greater part of it on the toilet. So, you'll
 ...

The 100 Most Pointless Things in the World

The world is full of pointless things. From rail replacement bus services to chip forks. From war to windchimes. From people who put cushions on beds to people who read the bit they write about the book on amazon. Look around you right now. Just about the only thing that isn't pointless is you. You look amazing. Join Alexander Armstrong and Richard Osman, the hosts of BBC1 quiz show Pointless as they take you on a journey through The 100 Most Pointless Things in the World. Filled with play-along quiz questions and unlikely facts, their hilarious collection of musings on some of the most pointless things found in everyday modern life is the perfect blend of the obscure, the fascinating and the downright silly.

Being as Communion

Possible. Worlds. What are the possibilities that information alternately realizes or
rules out? it is convenient to think of possibilities as ... From the vantage of
information, by contrast, worlds are the things most separated from each other
and ...

Being as Communion

In Being as Communion philosopher and mathematician William Dembski provides a non-technical overview of his work on information. Dembski attempts to make good on the promise of John Wheeler, Paul Davies, and others that information is poised to replace matter as the primary stuff of reality. With profound implications for theology and metaphysics, Being as Communion develops a relational ontology that is at once congenial to science and open to teleology in nature. All those interested in the intersections of theology, philosophy and science should read this book.

Casuistical Morning exercises

Tis the low vallies that are most fruitfull : ( a ) God hath chosen the foolish things
of the world : God picks up those that seem to others to be the Refuse of the
World , to confound the wise . As Christ chose the poor Fisher - men , to convince
the ...

Casuistical Morning exercises


The Traditions of the Western World

All this shows that however imperfect the knowledge of the highest things may be
, it bestows very great perfection on the soul : and consequently, although human
reason is unable to grasp fully things that are above reason, it nevertheless ...

The Traditions of the Western World

Originally published by Rand McNally in 1967 and now out-of-print, the first edition of The Traditions of the Western World, edited by J.H. Hexter with the assistance of John W. Snyder, Peter Riesenberg, Franklin L. Ford, and Klaus Epstein, provided teachers with a wide variety of historical documents to introduce the college reader to the traditions of the Western world. This shortened version of the text concentrates on Riesenberg's section. The Middle Ages, The Renaissance, and the Reformation, as well as a portion of Ford's, The Early Modern Period.

When Technology Fails

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the
world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has. — Margaret Mead Most of the
important things in the world have been accomplished by people who have kept
on ...

When Technology Fails

There’s never been a better time to “be prepared.” Matthew Stein’s comprehensive primer on sustainable living skills—from food and water to shelter and energy to first-aid and crisis-management skills—prepares you to embark on the path toward sustainability. But unlike any other book, Stein not only shows you how to live “green” in seemingly stable times, but to live in the face of potential disasters, lasting days or years, coming in the form of social upheaval, economic meltdown, or environmental catastrophe. When Technology Fails covers the gamut. You’ll learn how to start a fire and keep warm if you’ve been left temporarily homeless, as well as the basics of installing a renewable energy system for your home or business. You’ll learn how to find and sterilize water in the face of utility failure, as well as practical information for dealing with water-quality issues even when the public tap water is still flowing. You’ll learn alternative techniques for healing equally suited to an era of profit-driven malpractice as to situations of social calamity. Each chapter (a survey of the risks to the status quo; supplies and preparation for short- and long-term emergencies; emergency measures for survival; water; food; shelter; clothing; first aid, low-tech medicine, and healing; energy, heat, and power; metalworking; utensils and storage; low-tech chemistry; and engineering, machines, and materials) offers the same approach, describing skills for self-reliance in good times and bad. Fully revised and expanded—the first edition was written pre-9/11 and pre-Katrina, when few Americans took the risk of social disruption seriously—When Technology Fails ends on a positive, proactive note with a new chapter on "Making the Shift to Sustainability," which offers practical suggestions for changing our world on personal, community and global levels.

Why Most Things Fail

The implications of our analysis of failure and extinction appear to inhabit a totally
different world from that of Dr Pangloss. A character in Voltaire's Candide, he has
become famous for his boundlessly optimistic view of the world regardless of ...

Why Most Things Fail

From the best-selling author of The Death of Economics and Butterfly Economics, a ground-breaking look at a truth all too seldom acknowledged: most commercial and public policy ventures will not succeed. Paul Ormerod draws upon recent advances in biology to help us understand the surprising consequences of the Iron Law of Failure. And he shows what strategies corporations, businesses and governments will need to adopt to stand a chance of prospering in a world where only one thing is certain.

The Belief in a Just World

How do we live with the fact that we are essentially impotent to affect the
important things that happen in our world, the ... Far in advance of the data and
theory, it was my guess that most of us have experienced the thought that “it
doesn't make ...

The Belief in a Just World

The "belief in a just world" is an attempt to capmre in a phrase one of the ways, if not the way, that people come to terms with-make sense out of-find meaning in, their experiences. We do not believe that things just happen in our world; there is a pattern to events which conveys not only a sense of orderli ness or predictability, but also the compelling experience of appropriateness ex pressed in the typically implicit judgment, "Yes, that is the way it should be." There are probably many reasons why people discover or develop a view of their environment in which events occur for good, understandable reasons. One explanation is simply that this view of reality is a direct reflection of the way both the human mind and the environment are constructed. Constancies, patterns which actually do exist in the environment-out there-are perceived, represented symbolically, and retained in the mind. This approach cenainly has some validity, and would probably suffice, if it were not for that sense of "appropriateness," the pervasive affective com ponent in human experience. People have emotions and feelings, and these are especially apparent in their expectations about their world: their hopes, fears, disappointments, disillusionment, surprise, confidence, trust, despondency, anticipation-and certainly their sense of right, wrong, good, bad, ought, en titled, fair, deserving, just.

The Felt Meanings of the World

Each and every thing that appears in a feeling-awareness is an importance. In
globally contemplative feeling-awarenesses, all the things in the world in some
sense appear, although most of them appear in an indeterminate way and are
not ...

The Felt Meanings of the World

In a critical dialogue with the metaphysical tradition from Plato to Hegel to contemporary schools of thought, the author convincingly argues that traditional rationalist metaphysics has failed to accomplish its goal of demonstrating the existence of a divine cause and moral purpose of the world. To replace the defective rationalist metaphysics, the author builds a new metaphysics on the idea that moods and affects make manifest the world's felt meanings; he argues that each feature of the world is a felt meaning in the sense that each feature is a source of a feeling-response, if and when it appears. The author asserts that we must synthesize our two ways of knowing-poetic evocations and exact analyses-in order to decide which mood or affect is the appropriate appreciation of any given feature of the world. Smith gives evocative and exact explications of such features as the world's temporality, appearance, and mind-independency, as these features appear in the appropriate recitations.

The Encyclopedia of World Religions

It has caused wars, inspired great acts of compassion, and produced some of the
most exalted literature and philosophy ... of a religion's believers, their ways of
looking at the world, and the things that are most important in their religious lives.

The Encyclopedia of World Religions

Contains nearly 600 brief entries on the world's religious traditions.

Debating Brain Drain

Similar things may be said about inkind transfers, in which medical schools in the
developed world partner with those in the ... Although the programs will not solve
all issues of the brain drain, they will perhaps make it more likely that highly ...

Debating Brain Drain

Many of the best and brightest citizens of developing countries choose to emigrate to wealthier societies, taking their skills and educations with them. What do these people owe to their societies of origin? May developing societies legitimately demand that their citizens use their skills to improve life for their fellow citizens? Are these societies ever permitted to prevent their own citizens from emigrating? These questions are increasingly important, as the gap between rich and poor societies widens, and as the global migration of skilled professionals intensifies. This volume addresses the ethical rights and responsibilities of such professionals, and of the societies in which they live. Gillian Brock and Michael Blake agree that the phenomenon of the brain drain is troubling, but offer distinct arguments about what might be permissibly done in response to this phenomenon.

Empty Ideas

With no adverting to worlds, indeed, with no reification at all, it's thoughts quite
like that one—an enormous infinity of them–that ... here's the first paragraph of (
the body of) On the Plurality of Worlds: The world we live in is a very inclusive
thing.

Empty Ideas

Peter Unger's provocative new book poses a serious challenge to contemporary analytic philosophy, arguing that to its detriment it focuses the predominance of its energy on "empty ideas." In the mid-twentieth century, philosophers generally agreed that, by contrast with science, philosophy should offer no substantial thoughts about the general nature of concrete reality. Leading philosophers were concerned with little more than the semantics of ordinary words. For example: Our word "perceives" differs from our word "believes" in that the first word is used more strictly than the second. While someone may be correct in saying "I believe there's a table before me" whether or not there is a table before her, she will be correct in saying "I perceive there's a table before me" only if there is a table there. Though just a parochial idea, whether or not it is correct does make a difference to how things are with concrete reality. In Unger's terms, it is a concretely substantial idea. Alongside each such parochial substantial idea, there is an analytic or conceptual thought, as with the thought that someone may believe there is a table before her whether or not there is one, but she will perceive there is a table before her only if there is a table there. Empty of import as to how things are with concrete reality, those thoughts are what Unger calls concretely empty ideas. It is widely assumed that, since about 1970, things had changed thanks to the advent of such thoughts as the content externalism championed by Hilary Putnam and Donald Davidson, various essentialist thoughts offered by Saul Kripke, and so on. Against that assumption, Unger argues that, with hardly any exceptions aside from David Lewis's theory of a plurality of concrete worlds, all of these recent offerings are concretely empty ideas. Except when offering parochial ideas, Peter Unger maintains that mainstream philosophy still offers hardly anything beyond concretely empty ideas.

Earth Day

There are things that are unreal in the world today to the majority of people. We
have a civilization where the majority of people are blind. Jesus talked about the
blindness of people. They don't see the most important things there are in life.

Earth Day

After a half-century of activism, John McConnell, the true founder of Earth Day, here relates his global promotion of peace, justice, and Earth care. Following the Kennedy assassination, McConnell's Minute for Peace gained worldwide attention. This led to his Earth Day and other initiatives aimed at promoting people and planet. In this book, he shares the views that garnered support during the environmental movement from 1969 onward, and that have inspired followers for forty years at annual Earth Day ceremonies at the UN and cities across the globe. John McConnell coined the term Earth Day in 1968, proposed its celebration on the spring equinox to the City of San Francisco in October 1969, and announced it in November at a UNESCO Conference. The City responded by hosting the first Earth Day on March 21, 1970. Margaret Mead, UN Secretary-General U Thant, President Ford, and thirty-three Nobel laureates supported McConnell's Earth Day, and thirty-six worldwide dignitaries signed McConnell's Earth Day Proclamation, supporting Earth Day on the spring equinox, an annual planetary holiday linking people everywhere without regard to politics, culture, national border, or religion. In 1957, after Sputnik, McConnell promoted the Star of Hope, a satellite devoted to peace. This effort sparked his origination of Earth Day, the Earth Flag, Earth Trustees, and the Earth Magna Charta. He worked with UN officials and other leaders to overcome differences and build common ground for peace, aiming to ensure our planet's future and human survival. This book chronicles his global mission, his life journey, and his unique contributions toward a peaceful and cherished planet.

The World Went Very Well Then

Our lieutenant had been ashore three or four months in all, yet he filled the town
with his presence — a thing which only strong and masterful men can do. Most of
us, when wo go, are not missed at all, and our places are quickly filled up, ...

The World Went Very Well Then


Sung Dynasty Uses of the I Ching

In this way he can use the mind of the world as his own. ... To be able to do things
that are most broad, far-reaching, elevated and great [like these acts of
contemplating, hearing, speaking and thinking], and at its center not do a single
thing ...

Sung Dynasty Uses of the I Ching

The I Ching, or Book of Changes, has been one of the two or three most influential books in the Chinese canon. It has been used by people on all levels of society, both as a method of divination and as a source of essential ideas about the nature of heaven, earth, and humankind. During the eleventh and twelfth centuries, Sung dynasty literati turned to it for guidance in their fundamental reworking of the classical traditions. This book explores how four leading thinkers--Su Shih, Shao Yung, Ch'eng I, and Chu Hsi--applied the I Ching to these projects. These four men used the Book of Changes in strikingly different ways. Yet each claimed to find in it a sure foundation for human values. Their work established not only new meanings for the text but also new models for governance and moral philosophy that would be debated throughout the next thousand years of Chinese intellectual history. By focusing on their uses of the I Ching, this study casts a unique light on the complex continuity-within-change and rich diversity of Sung culture. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The 10 Most Important Things You Can Say to a Jehovah s Witness

The New World Translation is inaccurate, misleading, and heavily biased in favor
of Watchtower Society theology. Indeed, this translation is worded in such a way
that it virtually strips Jesus of His absolute deity. (Chapter 4 focuses on the ...

The 10 Most Important Things You Can Say to a Jehovah s Witness

Highlights false prophecies of Jehovah's Witnesses' leaders, errors in the New World Translation Bible, their unbiblical views.

Earth and Gods

an artwork assembles a world but anything whatsoever. This may give an
impression that each thing grants, 'things,” or approximates a new world. Truly,
however, each thing approximates the world; each thing, when thought of in its
most ...

Earth and Gods

Earth and Gods is an attempt to introduce the reader to Heidegger's fully developed philosophy. The title Earth and Gods gives an im pression of not being a general study of Heidegger's philosophy. However, this is not true - the earth and the gods are fundamental ontological symbols of his fully developed philosophy, namely, his third and final phase of thought. This phase repeats the problems of both preceding phases in a fuller and more developed manner; hence, it implies them. The two preceding phases are the phase of Dasein and the phase of Being. These two phases are a natural flow of fundamental problems which reach their final formation and development in the phase of earth and gods. Dasein (the first phase) leads to Being, and Being (the second phase) bursts into fundamental ontological powers of Being (Seinsmiichte) which are earth and sky, gods and mortals (the third phase). Since earth is unthinkable without sky and since gods are gods in the world of mortals - of men, the title Earth and Gods is an abbreviation of these four fundamental powers of Being. Hence, an investigation of earth and gods is an attempt to present Heidegger's philosophy as a whole. Such a presentation provides the reader with the background necessary for a more adequate and efficient understanding of the writings of Heidegger himself. Thus, Earth and Gods may rightly be considered an introduction to Hei degger's philosophy.

African Journal of New Poetry No 5

... an age when I already had imprinted upon me many, many things, good and
bad, things that pertain to specific cultural ... making it a world of its own, a full
world with traces of most of the world in it which can be I think something very rich
, ...

African Journal of New Poetry No  5


This World

Idiots never practiced such things as the giving of names for this very reason:
One should not be limited to what had been decreed to be by those ignorant of
the future, they claimed; one should be accepted as whatever he would become,
and ...

This World

A story whose characters you'll fall in love with. Grab hold of your seat and, before you start reading, get ready to stay put a while. Go with this zany cast while they set out to right the wrongs of This World and rescue She from the Tyrant of Lakeland's evil clutches. Experience laughter, shock, and quirky twists while the human race learns to start over with nothing more than the remnants of a previous civilization.