This Species of Property

In some areas of analysis This Species of Property provides a fuller description of slave life than can be found elsewhere.

This Species of Property

Owens' fascinating study explores the personality and behavior of the slave within the context of what it meant to be a slave. Based on a variety of plantation records, diaries, slave narratives, travelers' accounts, and other items bearing on the slave's experiences in his relationships to slaveholders, it concentrates on the years between 1770 and 1865.

The Property Species

In The Property Species, the economist Bart Wilson explores how we acquire, perceive, and know the custom of property, and why this might be relevant to social scientists, philosophers, and legal scholars for understanding how property ...

The Property Species

"What is property, and why does our species happen to have it? In The Property Species, Bart Wilson explores how Homo sapiens acquires, perceives, and knows the custom of property, and why it might be relevant for understanding how property works in the twenty-first century. Arguing from some hard-to-dispute facts that neither the natural sciences nor the humanities - nor the social sciences squarely in the middle - are synthesizing a full account of property, Wilson offers a cross-disciplinary compromise that is sure to be controversial: All human beings and only human beings have property in things, and at its core, property rests on custom, not rights. Such an alternative to conventional thinking contends that the origins of property lie not in food, mates, territory, or land, but in the very human act of creating, with symbolic thought, something new that did not previously exist. Integrating cognitive linguistics with the philosophy of property and a fresh look at property disputes in the common law, Wilson makes the case that symbolic-thinking humans locate the meaning of property within a thing. The provocative implications are that property - not property rights - is an inherent fundamental principle of economics, and that legal realists and the bundle of sticks metaphor are wrong about the facts regarding property. Written by an economist who marvels at the natural history of humankind, the book is essential reading for experts and any reader who has wondered why people claim things as "Mine!", and what that means for our humanity. "--

Species of Property

Species of Property


The Theory and Practice of Banking

Now , as we have observed above , that money is a species of property , or merchandize , quite distinct from commodities , and is exchangeable for them , but does not represent them , so it is easily seen that credit , or a debt ...

The Theory and Practice of Banking


The Property Species

And property is a human custom because it is a scheduling pattern of the species. Property resides in our environment—well, partly. The other part of property, of course, is in our genes. In every human language someone can say, ...

The Property Species

What is property, and why does our species have it? In The Property Species, Bart J. Wilson explores how humans acquire, perceive, and know the custom of property, and why this might be relevant to understanding how property works in the twenty-first century. Arguing that neither the sciences nor the humanities synthesizes a full account of property, the book offers a cross-disciplinary compromise that is sure to be controversial: Property is a universal and uniquely human custom. Integrating cognitive linguistics with philosophy of property and a fresh look at property disputes in the common law, the book makes the case that symbolic-thinking humans locate the meaning of property within a thing. That is, all human beings and only human beings have property in things, and at its core, property rests on custom, not rights. Such an alternative to conventional thinking contends that the origins of property lie not in food, mates, territory, or land, but in the very human act of creating, with symbolic thought, something new that did not previously exist. Written by an economist who marvels at the natural history of humankind, the book is essential reading for experts and any reader who has wondered why people claim things as "Mine!", and what that means for our humanity.

Reports of Cases Adjudged in the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania

The opinion of the Court was delivered by [ * 383 ] Duncan , J. - In giving a construction to this lease , we must take into view the subject matter of the contract , the species of property to which it related , and the place in which ...

Reports of Cases Adjudged in the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania


The Debates of the Constitutional Convention of the State of Maryland

Is there any The argument used at Washington when this great necessity why this species of property property was fleeing into that city wasshould be stricken down at one blow , whilst " This is not our business ; if you have not every ...

The Debates of the Constitutional Convention of the State of Maryland


Private Property and the Endangered Species Act

This is a common notion, and it suggests that we can resolve species-property conflicts by creatively implementing the act. Even the process that permits harm to endangered species (i.e., habitat conservation plan) may often be viewed ...

Private Property and the Endangered Species Act

Our whole nation benefits from the preservation of natural habitats and their diversity of animal and plant species—yet small groups of private landowners often bear most of the costs of setting land aside for conservation purposes. This imbalance has generated many conflicts since the passage of the Endangered Species Act in 1973 and remains one of the most controversial issues to be resolved as the ESA makes its way through Congress for reauthorization. To provide policy makers, landowners, and other stakeholders in the ESA debates with impartial baseline information, this book offers multidisciplinary perspectives on the role that private property plays in protecting endangered species in the United States. The opening chapter traces the evolution of the ESA and set forth the parameters of the debate over regulation of private property. Four subsequent chapters explore the judicial and economic implications of ESA and suggest how issues of scale and diversity affect the implementation of the ESA on private property. The volume concludes with eight principles to help frame the ongoing ESA reauthorization debate, developed by the University of Wyoming's Institute for Environment and Natural Resources Policy Board, the sponsor of the research presented in this book.

The Congressional Globe

One species of property , or one species of credit , may be exchanged for another ; but the great business of society is production , and the contracts for the division of the profits of this production between capital and labor ...

The Congressional Globe


Mechanical Properties of 23 Species of Eastern Hardwoods

Important mechanical properties of clear, straight-grained wood of 23 species are tabulated, along with coefficients of variation.

Mechanical Properties of 23 Species of Eastern Hardwoods

Important mechanical properties of clear, straight-grained wood of 23 species are tabulated, along with coefficients of variation. These property estimates can be used to match up species with kind of material needed for a specific job, or to search for substitutes for a presently used species. Some of the species appear, with allowable properties, in two published plywood manuals. There are no similar hardwood lumber stress grades, but standard methods exist for generating them, should interest develop.